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  1. #1
    morsetaper2 is online now Titanium
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    Where can I get something like this?



    In my mind it would be useful becuase no large bulky motor housing restricting the region between the wheels. Obviously I'd have to weld a stand and mount a motor. I have a MIG, steel tubing, and a 1/2 HP motor, so I'm pretty well there.

    What is something like this worth as pictured?

    Thanks

  2. #2
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    There WAS an outfit called The Prairie Tool Co. in Prairie Du Chien, Wisconsin, that made these. Number was (608) 326-6111. NOT CERTAIN THAT THEY ARE STILL IN BUSINESS. Even if they are not in business, you might yet find them in stock somewhere. (And, a call to the Chamber of Commerce might yield info on whose handling the line now.)

    Their product was also _apparently_ sold rebadged as Dayton. (Grinders seem to be identical) Grainger sells Dayton products.

    Flat-belt versions of this were made by Columbia or Columbian. (Not sure if this had any relation to the well-known vise company.)

    Did you notice how nice the tool rests are on the grinder you've pictured? They should all be so nice!

    With a little ingenuity, you could make up a grinding/polishing bench that had more than one belt-driven grinder and/or polishing arbor. You could even have a "lineshaft" under the bench and drive it all from one motor, although I think that might be a safety issue; why have something rotating next to your elbow if you don't need to?

    I was recently given a small polishing stand with a belt-driven arbor head. The comment about their being no bulky motor in the way is definitely true when you are buffing with cloth wheels!!!

    John Ruth

  3. #3
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    They're available from quite a few sources, depending on your budget.

    Brownells has the least expensive version. Go to http://www.brownells.com and search item # 177-300-330 .

    Stewart McDonald has one of the nicest, 3/4" diameter shaft that's 27" long. Go to http://www.stewmac.com/



    They're easy to shop-build & not too expensive. I used a 1" x 36" ground & polished drill rod shaft, mounted in Browning ball bearing pillow blocks. The shaft is threaded 3/4 UNF, with right hand threads on the right side, left hand threads on the left side.

    -------------------------
    Barry Milton

  4. #4
    Bill D is online now Titanium
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    For a line of grinders look at what lapidary people use. these are people who cut a nd polish rocks to make jewlery etc. I think a search of polishing lathe or mandrel might work.
    Bill D.

  5. #5
    Bill D is online now Titanium
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  6. #6
    kenh is online now Titanium
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    In days long gone, they were available at most hardware stores.

  7. #7
    mikerr is offline Aluminum
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    Very interesting toolrest set up in the original photo by morsetaper. If only it tilted fore and aft as well.

    Rgds

    Michael

  8. #8
    Forrest Addy is online now Diamond
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    A little fabrication, a couple of pillow blocks, a length of shafting with a little lathe work on it. Bada-Bing!

    I made about 20 for the new plating and polishing shop. There was no lack of resources when a rush hit.

  9. #9
    JST's Avatar
    JST
    JST is offline Diamond
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    I see those all the time at estate sales, etc.

    About $5 is what they go for, maybe sell for as much as $15 at ritzier sales.

  10. #10
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    gwilson is offline Diamond
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    I will try to describe these.The best tool rests used to be used on the old Craftsman bench grinderrs in the 50"s-70's.They had a short piece of steel bar mounted on edge to the grinder body,and another "L" shaped piece screwed to the piece that was attached to the grinder.You could get any angle with these tool rests.I use them to accurately grind carving gouges by turnine them all the way out towards the front of the grinder,and catchine the bolster of the gouge against the edge of the toolrest.This way you can remove the gouge repeatedly to dip it,and be assured of putting the gouge back at exactly the same angle to the edge.The most beautifully accurate,thin edges can be produced.I have no use for most of the newer tool rests.They need to be "double jointed" like the old ones.

  11. #11
    gwilson's Avatar
    gwilson is offline Diamond
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    P.S.Those old Sears grinders used to have flat faced motors,too.The full round motors get in the way when you are trying to grind something like a draw knife.The handles hit the motors.These grinders weren't heavy duty,or otherwise what you'd call great,but they were very handy.I'll never sell my two.

  12. #12
    Bruce Griffing is online now Stainless
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