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  1. #1
    Sierevello1 is offline Aluminum
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    Default Actual height of S size argon/co2 cylinder

    I sent an employee to swap out a 125cu/ft argon/co2 cylinder for the mig. He brought back what appears to be an exact match to the one I sent him with. However, the invoice says I got billed for a 174 cu/ft "S" cylinder. The difference between the two fills is about $30. So I called down there and they told me they upgraded my cylinder, and yes the old cylinder was still in test. They look the same...

    With the safety cap on the cylinder is a little over 48" tall. Anyone have one of these tanks you can measure or possibly measure a 125cu ft tank with the cap on for me so I can see what I have here? I would run it back but it is 45 minutes one way.

    Thanks,
    Steve

  2. #2
    bhigdog is offline Hot Rolled
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    Default

    Google "argon cylinder size" it will give all the info you need....................Bob

  3. #3
    Cole2534 is offline Titanium
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    Default Re: Actual height of S size argon/co2 cylinder

    Check the fill pressure?

  4. #4
    Sierevello1 is offline Aluminum
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    Default

    That is what I did, and it shows an "s" cylinder should be 50" high at the top of the valve. As I said mine is 48"... Is that close enough to make it a 174cu/ft tank? I don't know or I would not have asked...

    Fill pressure showed about 1750psi.

  5. #5
    thermite is offline Diamond
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    Nominal capacity should be stamped right near the rated pressures in either/both cubic feet / cubic meters, and that is basically all that matters.

    Actual diameter and height (mass as well) varies a tad by maker and more-yet by age. Alloys, usually 'non-shat' steel - a range of specifications, not one sole alloy, have changed over time -older cylinders generally having been made with thicker walls.

    IIRC, the oldest 7 cu meter Oxygen cylinder we ever refilled had a 1909 iniital test date on it. It had been well-cared for, had more than a few new valves over the years, and a long string of hydrostatic test dates, ending with one still-current.

    We asided it as a souvenir anyway rather than refill and re-issue.


    Bill

  6. #6
    Sierevello1 is offline Aluminum
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    Bill,

    Thanks for getting back with me. I checked the cylinder this morning and all that is stamped on it are the test dates, REE:112.0, DOT-3AA2015C or it could be a G, and what appears to be a serial #(1X-2739). Any idea from those what the capacity is?

    Thanks,

    Steve

  7. #7
    thermite is offline Diamond
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sierevello1 View Post
    Bill,

    Thanks for getting back with me. I checked the cylinder this morning and all that is stamped on it are the test dates, REE:112.0, DOT-3AA2015C or it could be a G, and what appears to be a serial #(1X-2739). Any idea from those what the capacity is?

    Thanks,

    Steve
    DOT wasn't yet the authority when I last had responsibility for those (1968). ICC was. Nowadays, there is a branch within DOT that covers it - Pipeline & Hazardous Materials Safety Administration.

    Still - '3AA' is familiar as the family, so there is some carry-over.

    Just highlight that DOT number, right-click your mouse, select google search in the pop-up menu, and find a table of capacities and dimensions at:

    Cylinders - High Pressure - DOT 3AA - for use with compressed gases. Especial Gas is a leading supplier of compressed gas cylinders exceeding FED SPEC TT-P-664D & TT-E-489J. Our product also complies with DSCR-JDTA Cutsheet No. 6830-1 (B), DTD 19 OCT

    Other hits should include:

    PHMSA - Cylinders

    Dot 3Aa2015c submited images | Pic2Fly

    Bill

  8. #8
    metalmagpie is offline Hot Rolled
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    Default

    S sized, or 150 cubic foot high pressure cylinders, are much more desirable than are M sized (125cf). The reason is simple. All 150cf high pressure cylinders are customer-owned. None are ever leased or rented. That means if you own an S cylinder no one can ever question you as to whether it's a rental/lease. Also, since most of the cost of refilling/swapping is labor, the fewer times you have to refill (larger cylinder) the less you will pay.

    It costs nearly as much to refill a 250cf oxygen cylinder as a 92cf oxygen cylinder, for example.

    Here's my own little table. Note that S sized cylinders come in varying heights and also that cylinder heights are measured from the ground to the base of the valve, NOT to the top of the valve cap.

    Welding Cylinder Data (capacity is in cubic feet @ 2100 psi)

    Oxygen / Argon / Helium / Other High Pressure
    Tank Designator Capacity Height Dia. (height w/o cap & valve)
    T 330 55" 9 1/4"
    K 251 51" 9"
    S 156 46" 7 to 7 3/8" *see note at bottom
    M 125 43" 7"
    Q 92 30" 7 1/8"
    R 20 14" 5 1/4"
    65 24" 7 1/2"
    Acetylene
    Tank Designator Capacity Height Dia. lbs. (tare weight)
    #5 350 45" 12" 171
    250 12" 117 (@300: 12x42"?)
    #4 150 38" 8" 75 (8.5x30-34"?)
    #3 75 29" 7" 44 (7x29"?)
    B 40 23" 6" 24-26 (6x19.5"?)
    MC 10 15" 4" 8 (4x13"?)

    One cubic foot of acetylene weighs 0.06734 pounds.
    One pound of acetylene is 14.85 cubic feet.
    A B bottle (26 lb tare) weighs 28.7 lbs with 40 cf acetylene.

    *150 cf cylinders can be 7" OD but are 3" taller than 125 cf cylinders

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