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Thread: Baked On Enamel

  1. #1
    blake in spokane is offline Hot Rolled
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    Default Baked On Enamel

    What is a good temp to put painted parts in the ol oven & for how long?

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    Fasto's Avatar
    Fasto is offline Hot Rolled
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    Quote Originally Posted by blake in spokane View Post
    What is a good temp to put painted parts in the ol oven & for how long?
    For Rust-Oleum I find 150 DegF and until they stop stinking, or your S.O. comes home. Actually 15-20 minutes will do.

  3. #3
    mobile_bob is offline Stainless
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    after baking does rustoleum getting tougher or more chip/scratch resistant?

    bob g

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    atomarc is online now Titanium
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    Quote Originally Posted by mobile_bob View Post
    after baking does rustoleum getting tougher or more chip/scratch resistant?

    bob g
    IMHO, anything other than normal drying for enamel paints like these seems to screw them up. Because they don't have a chance to dry normally they sometimes stay gummy...it's like the top crusts over and doesn't allow the thinners or reducers to dry from the layers below. Maybe it's just my imagination!

    Stuart

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    Lakeside53 is offline Stainless
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    I bake at 165, but in a convection oven, not radiant. Radiant will have a varying target surface temperature that depends on the color of the paint - very easy to burn.

    How long? 20 minutes or so, then just leave it in the oven until it cools.

    Thin layers only.. bake between coats.

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    SAG 180 is offline Titanium
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    Quote Originally Posted by atomarc View Post
    IMHO, anything other than normal drying for enamel paints like these seems to screw them up. Because they don't have a chance to dry normally they sometimes stay gummy...it's like the top crusts over and doesn't allow the thinners or reducers to dry from the layers below. Maybe it's just my imagination!

    Stuart

    You're not alone there, only a very thin coat bakes easily.

  7. #7
    cash's Avatar
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    If you have smaller parts engine paint works great.

    I use this for fixtures and small items.

    It is design to be baked on as it gives you tems and times right on the can.

    And SUPER durable.

  8. #8
    gustafson is offline Hot Rolled
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    It does work, did it for years on test equipment and baking, or even setting it under hot lights, hardened it up nicely

    of course using 'real' paint is better, but who has 100 bucks to paint small parts

  9. #9
    gpkull is offline Cast Iron
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    atomarc is saying basically what a rustoleum rep told me. we were not baking but if applied to thick the base would be "green" as in not cure properly. we thought we had issues but in california that stuff may cause cancer, go figure

  10. #10
    willbird is offline Banned
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    Adding the hardener to many enamels greatly enhances them...often the hardener can be found at the farm store. My Brother in law uses it in any acrylic enamel.....he prefers the "Rust Stop" stuff sold by Do it Best hardware, who for some reason does not sell the hardener. The hardener I think is the same as the old Dupont Duluxe hardener.

    If you mix up too much paint it will get like jello...you can retard the hardening by putting it in the fridge...and use thinner to sort of ungel it....we used some like that on his clothesline posts and it is still nice after 2 years outside, and they had some surface rust when we painted them.

    Bill

  11. #11
    AlleyCat is offline Cast Iron
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    I make a lot of electronic control panels that are aluminum. First step is to etch the bare aluminum with a weak sodium hydroxide (lye) solution for a couple of minutes. Rinse, dry and spray paint with Rustoleum enamel . Bake the panels at 220 degrees F for 30 minutes or so. Screen print and they're done. I tested the paint adhesion by repeatedly flexing a panel until the aluminum cracked. The paint never chipped or flaked and was adhered right up the the fracture line.

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