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  1. #1
    RC99's Avatar
    RC99 is offline Titanium
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    Default Bearing removal from shaft

    What is the best way to remove this bearing...Seeing as it is impossible to get anything behind it I am thinking my only method of attack is to grip the outside of the bearing with an adjustable bush sort of think...Like a collet with a tiny lip on the end to catch the edge of the bearing...




  2. #2
    hickstick_10 is online now Stainless
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    heat...........

  3. #3
    DaveE907 is offline Titanium
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    This is the job bearing separators are made for. It will ruin the bearing but remove it. The link below is only to show what one looks like. There are many sources for them and they come in various sizes.

    Bearing Separator - Pullers and Bearing Splitters - Pullers and Separators - Hand Tools : Grainger Industrial Supply

    Any good automotive will have the tools and do it for a small fee or perhaps a box of donuts.

  4. #4
    Jeff_M_PA is offline Cast Iron
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    If you don't do it all the time or don't want to wait for the UPS truck, I'm sure you see how that separator works and you can make something like it quickly. You could incorporate a feature that will let you pull on the puller from the threaded end of that shaft too, but if you use heat too it might pop right off. Since you are going to ruin the bearing anyway, just use a cutting torch.

    Caveman methods we use around here would JUST use the torch, and maybe a cold chisel and hammer...

  5. #5
    Limy Sami is offline Diamond
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    4 1/2"Angle grinder, chop off the outer track remove balls and cage then grind away inner track in one place 9/10 crack/ split before you break through,................ if of course you don't want to throw $$$ at it

  6. #6
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    Toms Wheels is offline Titanium
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    Lets say you didn't have a bearing separator, or it was to tight for one. I'd drive as heavy a blade screwdriver, or if enough room a chisel, 180 apart and tap them in, don't pry with them, if no joy, the O/A torch with a welding tip, heat just one spot on the inner race, between the balls, red hot if needed, just keep tapping in the chisels. If you don't have a torch, take a punch, punch out the ball separator, remove as much of the cage pieces as possible, slide all the balls together, and remove the outer race, now grab a sharpened chisel as wide as the width of the inner race, one guy holds the piece with the inner race on a anvil, place rags around the chisel and inner race to stop flying chips, eye protection for sure, a 3lb hammer and as much mustard you can put into the hammer. For sure you will crack the inner race they it just pry's off.

  7. #7
    RC99's Avatar
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    hmmmmm...Maybe I will just clean the gunk out of the bearing while it is on the spindle....Most of the methods as described I know of, but when it comes to precision spindles, i prefer to do it the right way rather then the blacksmith's way...

  8. #8
    hickstick_10 is online now Stainless
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    gentle heat with a small tip one the O/A torch on the inner race ALL AROUND the inner race, hold the shaft verticle while you heat (its really nice if you can suspend it by a cable or a chain so it will spin freely and you can keep the torch still. With enough heat the whole thing drops off or and requires an ABSOLUTE MINIMUM TO NO of prying. Prying should be a last resort.

  9. #9
    Limy Sami is offline Diamond
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    Quote Originally Posted by .RC. View Post
    hmmmmm...Maybe I will just clean the gunk out of the bearing while it is on the spindle....Most of the methods as described I know of, but when it comes to precision spindles, i prefer to do it the right way rather then the blacksmith's way...
    That's why carefull grinding is a good method, minimal risk of distortion.

    FWIW if you were considering re - using the bearing, pulling it off by the outer track will ruin it, ......... and I can't see any way of pulling it by the inner track.

  10. #10
    zach123 is offline Aluminum
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    get yourself a o/a torch with a heating tip on it and a big cold wet towel heat the bearing while holding the shaft with the cold wet towel. Possible some hits with a hammer to help jar the thing lose but you should be able to get them off this way without the hammer.
    I do this all the time with axles on are race quads.

  11. #11
    carl@handw.org is offline Aluminum
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    we recently bought an inductive heater kit at the shop-- perfect for jobs like this. form the wires to the o.d. of the part, plug them into the power unit and push the button.

  12. #12
    chrisfournier is offline Aluminum
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    Default Simple and effective

    Remove the outer race by whatever means you are comfortable with, torch or grinder. You are now left with the inner race on the shaft. I TIG weld because I have this process, a bead 360 degrees around the inner race. Let this cool and the contraction of the weld bead will make it very easy to remove the race without damaging the spindle. I have used this technicque on all manner of assemblies robust and delicate to good effect.

  13. #13
    Peter S is offline Titanium
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    How about removing those square keys and see if the holes go right through to the bearing? You may be able to jack the bearing off using the tapped holes, or maybe at least get a pin punch through....

  14. #14
    Phil Rocky is offline Plastic
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    Default Try this !!

    Spray some of that venerial beer on it ! Just kidding, tighten a guillotine puller plate on between the bearing and end of the shaft and put in a press. Spray some Inox or WD40 around the inner race of the bearing. I could do it for you if you live close.

  15. #15
    wippin' boy is offline Diamond
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    get a piece of heavy wood
    place on bench of floor
    hold shaft in hand with bearing up
    thump opposite end on wood straight down
    inertia will drive bearing down shaft
    this looks to be a spindle bearing
    they are slip fit and as long as it isn't cockeyed or galled to shaft it will come right off
    with the method described

  16. #16
    RC99's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter S View Post
    How about removing those square keys and see if the holes go right through to the bearing? You may be able to jack the bearing off using the tapped holes, or maybe at least get a pin punch through....
    I had a look and it appears the drive dogs for the NT30 taper are drilled right through to the bearing...

    Thanks for the help everyone..

  17. #17
    PixMan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wippin' boy View Post
    get a piece of heavy wood
    place on bench of floor
    hold shaft in hand with bearing up
    thump opposite end on wood straight down
    inertia will drive bearing down shaft
    this looks to be a spindle bearing
    they are slip fit and as long as it isn't cockeyed or galled to shaft it will come right off
    with the method described
    This is what I would try first, as it'll probably work fine and it's quick and safe. Just be sure to use very soft pine wood. Try that with a fine Brazilian mahogany and you'll be looking for a new spindle.

  18. #18
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    keithmech is offline Hot Rolled
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    use an air powered chisel,the kind used to cut off mufflers,thin sheet metal etc.
    Instead of a cutting chisel use something with a blunt end.Make up a jig to hold the bearing,
    plastic ,wood ,aluminum.Clamp it firmly in the vise.Hold the air chisel against the end of the shaft and give it a blast.You might be able to just hold the bearing and push it out this way.

  19. #19
    Mike C. is offline Diamond
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    Seems you have already found the bolt holes and likely used them for knockoffs, but I prefer the torch for fine precision work like this. Doesn't sound right, does it? It's true. It's not the blacksmith's method, it's actually better than any puller you can use. I remove bearings this way nearly every day. Try it one time and you'll be a believer.

    When you drive or pull the bearing off, you are going to smear the fit and possibly cock the inner race as it comes off. Same for any method that forces the bearing off the fit. One removal will not be an issue, but I end up knurling and even spraying a lot of pump motor shafts after several times of pressing the bearing off. When you remove a bearing that is pressed on without loosening the fit, the shaft seat is going to flow. No way around it.

    You'll have to burn off the outer race. No big deal, just don't point the torch at the part you don't want cut. Start at the open end, tangential to the shaft and don't dally around. Quickly heat the edge of the race until it starts to melt and hit the O2. Just wash a slot in the outer race, stopping as close as you dare to the shoulder. Repeat 180 degrees out. If it doesn't fall off, wedge a screwdriver or chisel in the gap, or just grab with pliers, and the remaining ring at the shoulder will pop.

    Now, let everything cool to room temp. Once cool, stand the shaft on end, possibly suspended with a chain or whatever (large diam shafts will usually balance on end). Fire up the torch and put the heat directly on the inner race and start working it around. Idea is to get the heat into the inner race. When the inner race expands, it turns loose and creates an air gap. Once the gap is formed, even less heat is transferred to the shaft, speeding expansion of the race. When you hit the magic temp, the bearing falls off. No marring of the race, no problems. You have not changed the fit of the shaft, as the bearing never slid off under pressure.

    Grinding works OK in some cases, but this is to a shoulder. You'll risk hitting the shoulder with a grindwheel actually more than with the torch.

    When you put those bearings back on, you'll need to find a bearing heater to reverse the process. Last thing you want to do to your precision bearings is put them in a press and cram them on. With a bearing heater, you set the temp (240F or so), turn on the heater, and it lets you know when the bearing is at temp. Wearing gloves, you QUICKLY slide the bearing onto the seat. No forceing of any kind, no chance of brinelling (when the press starts clunking as the bearing is pressed on), no fear of bearing damage.

  20. #20
    sma11 is offline Plastic
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    A steady wrist and an abrasive wheel equipped die grinder would get that off no problem.
    Cut the outer race off with a zip disk. Remove
    Cut a diagonal groove across the circumference of the inner race, as deep and as close to the shoulder as you are comfortable doing. For this, use a cutoff wheel in a die grinder. To get closer to the shoulder, put in a nice and pointed mounted abrasive wheel. Grind as close to the race ID and shoulder as possible.
    With a broad pointed chisel, support the shaft and lightly strike the side of this diagonal groove. There should be very little material left in the bottom of the groove so a sharp strike will break the race here. It should now slide off that shaft as slick as silk.

    You should be confident with a die grinder to do this. Just a little care is all you need.
    I do not like using O/A if I don't have to. I'd rather not heat and burn near machine components if not needed.
    Most of my pressed bearings are removed like this or with a bead of weld.

    Check out SKF's directions for mounting and dismounting precision bearings. Mounting - Bearings with a cylindrical bore

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