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  1. #1
    Mickey_D's Avatar
    Mickey_D is online now Stainless
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    Default Best Way to Finish Lexan Edges?

    I make a lot of Lexan (MR10 grade) windows and covers for control panels, most of the either saw cut if they are straight or cut in the mill for more complex shapes. I presently use fine grit sponge style sanding pads for finishing the cut edges but with quantities climbing I am looking for a better solution. I wish that I could use a laser for this, but Lexan does not do with with one like acrylic does. Anyone have a good solution for this?

  2. #2
    magicmaker is online now Hot Rolled
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    I use an expanding rubber wheel with wet belt sleeve. These are run with a slow water drop to keep things cool and flush away "dust". They can be found at lapidary supply places. A worn grit belt will virtually polish the material. Splash shield, water collection tray, and recirculation pump are used.
    Jim

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    atomarc is offline Titanium
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    Mickey,

    Does Lexan not respond to a small torch passed over its edges...maybe I'm thinking Acrylic and you have stated they are different animals. I would try the torch though...unless you already have. Let me know so I can quit passing out bum info!!

    Stuart

  4. #4
    Jon Bohlander's Avatar
    Jon Bohlander is offline Stainless
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    Can you have a small chamfer or radius done on the mill or with a router for the sawn pieces? You might have some secondary burrs but they would be easier to knock off than that nasty sharp edge.

    Does anyone know how well polycarbonate flame polsihes? With acrylic, we would run a MAPP torch along the cut edges and it would leave a clear finish as well break the edge. It takes some practice and is easy to mess up though.

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    Mickey_D's Avatar
    Mickey_D is online now Stainless
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    I have gotten thicker pieces to torch polish but a lot of what I do is 1/8" and we have to leave the original protective paper on it, and that really gets ugly when the paper melts in. I like the idea of using a wet sander, I am going to look around and see what I can piece together.

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    magicmaker is online now Hot Rolled
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    rbent is offline Hot Rolled
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jon Bohlander View Post

    Does anyone know how well polycarbonate flame polsihes? With acrylic, we would run a MAPP torch along the cut edges and it would leave a clear finish as well break the edge. It takes some practice and is easy to mess up though.
    I haven't been able to get polycarbonate material to flame polish like I can acrylic, it just doesn't work the same for me.

  8. #8
    snowman is online now Diamond
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    Use a very light angle chamfer on a router table. You just run the part so it deburs the edge, flip, then redo it on the other side. What you end up with is a semi-rounded edge that finishes well.

    If you need it polished, you can use a little methylene chloride....but I'd rather not deal with the crap.

  9. #9
    AvastMW is offline Plastic
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    1800rpm buffer. If your cuts are pretty smooth then a loose cotton buff with blue rouge. If rougher cuts, sewn buff with red rouge.

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