Brad Penn way oil- any users?
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  1. #1
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    Default Brad Penn way oil- any users?

    Stopped in at the local jobber & asked what they had in medium way oil ISO 68 or so. Office lady asked if I wanted Brad Penn? It brought to mind passing the refinery in Bradford; I always wondered what they made. She read the data sheet. Nothing sounded "special" besides the usual ad copy gobbledegook but it did say tacky/stringy. Could not see any reason not to try it for the planer. She said they had Shell Tonna, too.

    Never heard of way oil so cheap, $40.08 for 5gal Brad Penn 68 vs more than twice that for Shell Tonna.

    Needless to say, a pail of Brad Penn came home for use in the planer wells. Has to be as good as anything that was used when the machine was built in the 1920's.

    Having never heard of it before, I was wondering if anyone else uses it or has comments good, bad, or otherwise?

    smt

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    My old friend ran a large gas station and hauled out of there (IIRC fuel oil), as well as most of the other refinery's and pipeline tank farms within 200 miles. He also sold the Brad Penn products at the store (oils and greases) right next to Shell.

    Brad Penn is a common brand around here at the local auto parts stores, but I didn't know they sell machine tool oils. Good to know, I can have my local auto parts store order it in for me.

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    Brad Penn is well known among performance vintage engine builders. They make a high zinc content oil for flat tappet cam based engines with high valve spring forces.

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    Motion - I've heard of the racing oils which seem to have a following in some "circles" so to speak. But had not previously connected them to the refinery or heard they made way oil. Barring any unfavorable user or tech reports, it's quite nice to save $50/pail or so for at least manual machine apps.

    Forgot to include this link with first post:

    http://www.amref.com/Media/Files/bp_...ay_Oils_PB.pdf

    smt

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    I'm sure it's good. I think they are the former Quaker State (?) oil. But as you note...it's gotta be better than anything from years back. And ways don't pose an especially tough application for oil. There's no combustion, not much heat, not much pressure, not much environment variation or extremes.

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    Quote Originally Posted by motion guru View Post
    Brad Penn is well known among performance vintage engine builders. They make a high zinc content oil for flat tappet cam based engines with high valve spring forces.
    That would explain the odd smell as I drive by the place....

    Certainly not like united refining in Warren Pa.

    Honestly I didn't know they (Brad Penn) are nationwide, and made anything "unique".

    As far as being the old "Quaker State" refinery, I'm not sure, they closed
    so long ago, I keep thinking they were down in Oil city, but the only refinery
    I found near there was the old (now torn down) Rouschville refinery that was Pennzoil/wolfs head.
    Last edited by digger doug; 02-17-2017 at 08:18 PM.

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    Lots of vintage engine guys use Brad Penn engine oil. We run it in our V4 Bonneville engine. My understanding was it was formerly Kendall petroleum not Quaker State but . . . .
    On edit- I got curious and found this on the WWW:

    In 1997, American Refining Group, Inc. (ARG), a privately held energy company headquartered in Philadelphia, PA, purchased the Kendall/Amalie refinery located in Bradford, PA, from Witco Corporation. As a result of the sale by Witco, of the Kendall® and Amalie® brands to a third party, a new name was given to the products produced at the site: Brad Penn® Premium Pennsylvania Grade Lubricants. Founded in 1881 at the height of the domestic oil boom, the Bradford refinery is the only refinery processing 100% Pennsylvania Grade crude oil. It is also the oldest continuously operated lube oil refinery in the world. Due to the consistency of our feedstocks, the quality of our products can be traced from the wellhead to the finished packaged product.

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    Ah yes...Kendall....I forgot.

    Word has it they developed the first synthetic oil there.

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    Yea, Kendall is who I was thinking of

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    Brad Penn was recommended to me by a local cam grinder (Oregon Cam Grinding) when I had wiped the lobes off a vintage GMC inline six cam using modern oils that have all the zinc removed to prevent damage to exhaust gas sensors used in emission control systems.

    Apart from converting the valve train to a roller cam design, the added zinc is the only way to keep the cam lobes and lifters from self destructing within 100 hours of a rebuild. (which I experienced twice before I figured out what was going on)

    Switched to the zinc added formulation and I have about 20,000 miles with no noticeable wear on the lifters or lobes.

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