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Thread: Buffing Tips?

  1. #21
    i_r_machinist is online now Titanium
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    Magicmaker,
    Thanks for posting! Looks like I need to do some shopping. What's the reason for taper point on the one buffer? Faster wheel replacement? The pics helped a lot! My grey matter doesn't absorb as fast as it used to.

    Chip, How 'bout a pic of Buffzilla?

    I'll try to post a pic of what I did last night.
    thanks to all!
    i_r_

  2. #22
    magicmaker is online now Hot Rolled
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    i_r;
    The tapered point is on my secondary buffer (not pictured). The primary buffer has 5/8" arbor sizes (shaft is 1" in diameter). A tapered point allows easy/quick wheel changes from very small (1/2" diameter) wheels up to as big as the buffer can drive. Wheels for the primary buffer all need 5/8" holes. With the taper arbor, virtually any size arbor hole is fine. Tapered is not particularly good for ganging wheels but is fine for single wheels. Wheels come with standard arbor hole sizes or for tapered arbors. If you want to see a multiple wheel buffing setup, go to a shoe repair business and check out the buffer there. Similar arbors are sold to mount in wood lathes. I would not want to buff in my wood lathes. I like the lathes too much.
    Jim
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  3. #23
    Stradbash is offline Aluminum
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chip Chester View Post
    Stradbash, if you're doing a lot like that on your lathe, you might try a variable-speed drill on a stand, away from the lathe. (Last time I did that, I had quite a bit of messy grit to clean up.) Your abrasive material may not shed very much, so it may not be a big issue...Chip
    Thanks! Great advice!

    I don't do a -lot- of polishing, and I do like my lathe...

    Though a very nice one..., the lathe I'm doing this on is a speed lathe and it is very quick and easy for me to remove the compound and get it out of the way. I also put a bit of oil on the ways/bed plate and cover that with at least a layer of plastic wrap. The oil helps it cling and I'm able to clean it all up before I remove the plastic wrap. I then clean the bed, re-oil it etc. The bed is fairly freshly ground and I don't see any wear as a result of my polishing.
    The sander with a vacuum attached helps a LOT with dust/grit! Not cheap but it is great to be able to control the speed of the sander and the lathe spindle speed to suit the material etc. It makes a huge difference to not have a circumferential scratch pattern from sanding when I start buffing.
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  4. #24
    i_r_machinist is online now Titanium
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    Man, You cats are the BEST!
    I bought the ONLY 6" diameter, 1/4" stitch, buffing wheel in Stephenville Texas, on the way home. Also picked up some Tripole? red buffing stick. Didn't get the finishing buffer wheel because it was a 1" stitch and needed a 3/4",( I think).
    Got home and made a spacer for the grinder turned buffer on my handy dandy BP ezpath. Turned the repurposed grinder (new buffer) on and doped up the wheel with the red. 5 minutes later I'm covered in nasty whitish fibers and holding a part on an arbor, (wear gloves, as advised, HOT), that looks incredible! Buffed perpendicular to scratches.
    Hit them with a 4" wheel in my air grinder with white polish, for about a minute, and they came out great.
    I will not buff in the lathe again.
    Thanks for the advise and the help!
    i_r_machinist
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails photo149.jpg   photo148.jpg  
    Last edited by i_r_machinist; 02-22-2012 at 06:39 PM. Reason: crappy picture
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  5. #25
    magicmaker is online now Hot Rolled
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    i_r;
    Now, if you lightly coat the polished items with a thin coat of Renaissance Wax and hand buff it with a clean old T-shirt, you will slow down any oxidation from forming.
    Jim

  6. #26
    Stradbash is offline Aluminum
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    Quote Originally Posted by magicmaker View Post
    i_r;
    Now, if you lightly coat the polished items with a thin coat of Renaissance Wax and hand buff it with a clean old T-shirt, you will slow down any oxidation from forming.
    Jim
    Good Advice!

    That wax is not cheap, but the little can of it will last a long time. You don't need much.

    Yes, the fluff that comes off a new buffing wheel is quite something!

  7. #27
    i_r_machinist is online now Titanium
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    From the price, I'm guessing this Renaissance Wax beats "Brasso" hand down?
    No local sources. I'll have to get some in quick, customer's son-in-law just got back from Afghanistan, and wants to give them to him before he leaves again.
    Do the pleated wheels make this much mess?
    have fun
    i_r_

  8. #28
    Stradbash is offline Aluminum
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    Quote Originally Posted by i_r_machinist View Post
    From the price, I'm guessing this Renaissance Wax beats "Brasso" hand down?i_r_
    Brasso is a polishing compound, the wax will help protect from tarnishing. It is often available at woodworking places such as Woodcraft or Rockler if there happens to be one near you. If you cannot get the wax in time, no big deal! I would just present them as they are. They look great and they'll be fine.

    I'll let others with more experience address the wheel question.

  9. #29
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    Porschefix is offline Cast Iron
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    Im wracking my brain trying to think if there might be someone you know who is close to you who might know a thing about polishing things to a mirror finish, hmmm,, the name is on the tip of my tongue but I just caint remember. Oh well, anyway, I can donate a lifetime supply of Rennaissance wax if you'd like to drive 5 minutes out of your way and stop in sometime. Those look great BTW, werent they supposed to be a Christmas present last year? I'd like to show you how to polish on your lathe without making a mess, I've used a buffing wheel like that before and it does make quite a mess. (sitting here with wry grin on ugly puss)
    Have fun yo'self Kerry!
    BTW thanks for the compliment in that other post.

  10. #30
    i_r_machinist is online now Titanium
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    Ron,
    I actually expected you to be the first or second poster on this topic, but when you didn't chime in, I figured you were out doing the adjusting bit. I'll stop by this afternoon if you're going to be around.
    Yes, they were supposed to be done by Christmas. Both my cnc's died right before the holidays and I had to buy new brains for both. Just got the mill running about 2 weekends ago. Lost most of my engraving programs and had to start from scratch. My stupid ass fault for not having backups. Will not happen again.
    I have a few other questions for a world class finisher, but I can't seem to remember his name. Don?
    have fun
    i_r_

  11. #31
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    Chip Chester is offline Stainless
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    The name says it all... Buffzilla.

    Some caveats: this machine was shop-made by the previous owner, when he would rather have been spending time on his gunsmithing. So it's not a work of art. 1/2" steel top plate, cut with a flame axe... (or heated with flame, and cut with an actual axe.) All belts are "captive" and require disassembly to replace... so, pre-linkbelt. Everything spins at 3600 rpm. Has a shop footprint bigger than my Powermatic 66 cabinet saw.

    On the pics, what you see on the "front" is repeated on the back. 4 wheels on the bottom layer, 8 on the mezzanine. Bronze bushings all around. Baldor motors, though! (Photo is pre-repair of electrical wiring issues.) Belt guards and shields are for cowards, apparently. It was also on much higher legs when I got it, and was extraordinarily top-heavy and wobbly, and a true danger to move. Took off 10" of leg, and put it on a square steel rolling base. Now it's just heavy.

    I'll run it through its paces this spring, and see if a dozen wheels are required, or whether just 8 will do for my use. I may find there's not enough room around the inner wheels for proper work access. It would be nice if it had a smaller footprint... maybe an arrangement that would let me fold it vertically, like a drafting table, and park it against the wall when not in use.

    Anyway, here it is, in full splendor... I give you Buffzilla.

    Chip
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails photo_030709_002.jpg   photo_030709_003.jpg  

  12. #32
    i_r_machinist is online now Titanium
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    I think that 10" that you cut off the legs was to save the shop cat's tail. With the mess I made with one wheel, I'd be afraid to turn that monster on!
    have fun
    i_r_

  13. #33
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    Personally I have had better luck with 1750RPM than the higher RPM. I use an old motor that I made an extended arbor for and got great results. Bought a new Baldor with the higher RPM and don't use it. Went back to the original one. I hand sand more than most and only use spiral sewn wheels. Mainly stainless and brass. Can't help you with aluminum, can't stand doing it.

    looks like your pieces turned out very nice and hats off. Everyone has to find out what works best for them. It's the end result that matters.







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  14. #34
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    Kevco: Is that a shiny-shiny (newer) mini 14 with a synthetic stock? Looks like a showgirl! Sweet.

  15. #35
    blake in spokane is offline Hot Rolled
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    Has anyone used Zoopseal or Eversheild after polishing their parts?

  16. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by heftylefty View Post
    Kevco: Is that a shiny-shiny (newer) mini 14 with a synthetic stock? Looks like a showgirl! Sweet.
    Yea it is. It's a stainless ranch and it's my varmit gun for ground hogs and coyotes. Put on a Hogue stock as it sticks to your hands like glue. Not everyones cup of tea but it does the job!

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