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  1. #1
    brianklein is offline Aluminum
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    Default Does anyone know where to purchase Tungsten Carbide Stock from???

    I'm looking to get a round stock/piece rougly about 1/2" in Diameter. Does anyone know who sell this type of material and stock??? Thanks

  2. #2
    register's Avatar
    register is offline Cast Iron
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    McMaster carries it in a variety of diameters, shapes, and lengths.

    Any cutting tool supply should have it.

    Henry Wettersten

  3. #3
    Mud's Avatar
    Mud
    Mud is offline Diamond
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    This is a good place to get Carbide - http://www.carbideprocessors.com/materials.htm

  4. #4
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    johnoder is offline Diamond
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    Another vote for Tom Walz's place. The best.

    John Oder

  5. #5
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    gwilson is offline Diamond
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    The machinery salesmen at MSC can put you in contact with a carbide manufacturer who can custom make carbide to your needs.

  6. #6
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    tomwalz is offline Stainless
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    Thank you, Gentlemen.

    Yes, we can help with round rod and are happy to do so.

    Tom

  7. #7
    oldmech is offline Aluminum
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    If it is a short piece you might consider an solid carbide end mill. ebay, or on here?
    re

  8. #8
    brianklein is offline Aluminum
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    I'm trying to make a 6 slotted external spline out of the 1/2" OD Tungsten Carbide. I have an attachment of what the spline looks like (ignore the outer circle in the picture and treat the inner part as if it's the cross section of the external spline). The OD of the spline is 1/2" and the ID of the .480., and the slot are .0889 wide. I trying to figure out how to cut the 6 slots into the Tungsten Carbide. Does anyone have any suggestions???
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails spline.jpg  

  9. #9
    John in CA is offline Hot Rolled
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    I'm thinking sinker EDM? Although I'm not sure how deep they can go before chip flushing becomes an issue. What would the length of the part be?

  10. #10
    CarbideBob is offline Titanium
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    Part in indexing head.
    Slot with grinding wheel just like you would put flutes in a reamer.
    Slots are only .010 deep? Whats the min. allowed radius in the corners?
    Are you sure you want to make this from carbide?
    If it has to take any kind of beating (forward/reversing under load) you'll want a die grade (coarse grain, lots of cobalt).
    Bob

  11. #11
    brianklein is offline Aluminum
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    about 9" in length. You couldn't use an end mill to cut the slot???

  12. #12
    CarbideBob is offline Titanium
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    Quote Originally Posted by brianklein View Post
    about 9" in length. You couldn't use an end mill to cut the slot???
    Nope, you can't mill carbide. (except in the "green" state before it's been sintered and it can't be shipped to you in the green state or it will fall apart)
    Do the splines have to run full length?
    Bob

  13. #13
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    bosleyjr is offline Diamond
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    Tungsten carbide is among the hardest materials known.

    Cutting carbide with a tool steel endmill would be like cutting a kitchen knife with butter. Cutting carbide with carbide, like cutting a stick of butter with another stick of butter. Will destroy both your workpiece and the carbide end mill.

    As a previous poster asked, why is carbide your material of choice? It is more brittle than other materials.

    If this is to transmit power, why are you using cutting tool material?

    Jim

  14. #14
    brianklein is offline Aluminum
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    I though that Tungsten Carbide was very strong (provided that it has a lot of Cobalt). Plus i am using this spline for a task that will require it to be extremely tough.

  15. #15
    brianklein is offline Aluminum
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    Quote Originally Posted by CarbideBob View Post
    Nope, you can't mill carbide. (except in the "green" state before it's been sintered and it can't be shipped to you in the green state or it will fall apart)
    Do the splines have to run full length?
    Bob
    yes they do.

  16. #16
    loggerhogger is online now Stainless
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    According to my limited understanding, Tungston Carbide is a very hard metal, but can also be brittle. I would think that you would be better off using a different kind of steel, one that can take the sudden loads that might be incured in power transmition without shattering.

  17. #17
    John in CA is offline Hot Rolled
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    Sorry for my earlier post, missed the part about ignoring the outer circle in the drawing. Duh.

    There are tougher grades of carbide formulated for impact resistance; I haven't gotten around to it yet, but at work sometime next week I'll be sourcing some carbide stock to make replacement peens for an orbital riveter. I'll let you know what I find.

  18. #18
    CarbideBob is offline Titanium
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    Carbide is very hard but not exactly tough.
    Clamp a piece of 1/2 rod in a vise and hit it sideways with a hammer and it will break.

    Carbide is a powered metal with a structure much like concrete.
    A column can take a huge load in compression but you can break it in half with a sledge hammer.

    Toughness is increased by using large grains and lots of cobalt. These are C-12 through C-14 grades. Generally known as impact grades.
    We use these for things like facedrivers, punches or hammers for recycling plants. Again these are compression applications.

    Maybe think about something like a piece of O-1 drill rod and have it heat treated after machining.
    Your part could certainly be ground with diamond wheels but I think you are looking at the wrong material for your shaft.
    Bob

  19. #19
    brianklein is offline Aluminum
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    Quote Originally Posted by CarbideBob View Post
    Carbide is very hard but not exactly tough.
    Clamp a piece of 1/2 rod in a vise and hit it sideways with a hammer and it will break.

    Carbide is a powered metal with a structure much like concrete.
    A column can take a huge load in compression but you can break it in half with a sledge hammer.

    Toughness is increased by using large grains and lots of cobalt. These are C-12 through C-14 grades. Generally known as impact grades.
    We use these for things like facedrivers, punches or hammers for recycling plants. Again these are compression applications.

    Maybe think about something like a piece of O-1 drill rod and have it heat treated after machining.
    Your part could certainly be ground with diamond wheels but I think you are looking at the wrong material for your shaft.
    Bob

    What is O-1 drill rod???

  20. #20
    Bill's Machine Shop is offline Hot Rolled
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    O-1 is Oil hardening drill rod tool steel. I would recommend a piece of 4140. That's the stuff the make axles out of. Very hard, very tough.

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