hardest stainless steel in 3/32
Close
Login to Your Account
Results 1 to 17 of 17
  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    usa
    Posts
    6
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default hardest stainless steel in 3/32

    I am trying to find the hardest stainless steel (round rod) in 3/32. I tried 303 but its just way to soft. I am trying to reduplicate a piece. Its slightly magnetic, but not hardened by any means. Just hard after its pressed in place. They call it spring steel, but it doesn't rust. I am also finding it hard to find any stainless in 3/32. There part is has round rod 5/64 (stainless)

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Hillsboro, New Hampshire
    Posts
    3,676
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    749
    Likes (Received)
    2405

    Default

    If you can use a pin shorter than 2" long, then these medium-hardness 416 3/32" dowel pins may work for you: McMaster-Carr

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Hatch, NM Chile capital of the WORLD
    Posts
    7,795
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    9757
    Likes (Received)
    8441

    Default

    If you need short straight pieces, dowel pins.. If it doesn't have to be straight, look for
    wire. (you can actually buy it in straight 1ft lengths) 304 "spring temper" wire is easy to get..
    Check McMaster Carr.

    McMaster-Carr

    5/64. 0.0781" McMaster Carr has .075 and .080, less than $20 for 100ft in straight(ish) 1ft lengths.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Washington
    Posts
    276
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    107
    Likes (Received)
    146

    Default

    Misumi and PIC Design carry hardened 416 stainless dowel pins in 2.5mm (.0984") diameter. It doesn't sound like you're dealing with any kind of volume - polishing out ~5 thou wouldn't take very long with some diamond compound.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Hillsboro, New Hampshire
    Posts
    3,676
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    749
    Likes (Received)
    2405

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by apt403 View Post
    Misumi and PIC Design carry hardened 416 stainless dowel pins in 2.5mm (.0984") diameter. It doesn't sound like you're dealing with any kind of volume - polishing out ~5 thou wouldn't take very long with some diamond compound.
    Umm - it'd be a right PITB, and not give a great cylindrical shape when done. Much better to go with ground to size material if possible.

  6. Likes Ray Behner, litlerob1 liked this post
  7. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    7,881
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3919
    Likes (Received)
    3500

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jpatz18 View Post
    I am trying to find the hardest stainless steel (round rod) in 3/32. I tried 303 but its just way to soft. I am trying to reduplicate a piece. Its slightly magnetic, but not hardened by any means. Just hard after its pressed in place. They call it spring steel, but it doesn't rust. I am also finding it hard to find any stainless in 3/32. There part is has round rod 5/64 (stainless)
    Hardest? Seriously? Would an ignorant M42 drill blank do yah?


  8. Likes sfriedberg liked this post
  9. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Dewees Texas
    Posts
    1,576
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    19
    Likes (Received)
    370

    Default

    We got a bunch of whip antennas from a company that sounds like Neutron or something like that. Anyway they are made from 300 series stainless and very spring like. We use them for gaps in the dividing a field for a center pivot irrigation system. They are hooked up to a fence charger and keep the cattle in a particular field but allow the pivot to go through with no intervention. They are near 3/32 and very springy.
    As much as I like machining heat treated 416 it is no where near as springy as antenna stock. After one of these antennas gets hit by lightning they are about as limp as a wet noodle.

  10. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Hillsboro, New Hampshire
    Posts
    3,676
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    749
    Likes (Received)
    2405

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Monarchist View Post
    Hardest? Seriously? Would an ignorant M42 drill blank do yah?

    M42 being known for it's stainless steel-like rust resistance. And for being stainless steel.

  11. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    7,881
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3919
    Likes (Received)
    3500

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Milland View Post
    M42 being known for it's stainless steel-like rust resistance. And for being stainless steel.
    And 'drill blanks' being available a tad + or -, you choose... so less likelihood of having to mess with "re-sizing".

    OTOH, we've not been told if the OP needs ONE (I keep index-boxed sets handy as "problem solvers") .. or ten-thousand... nor how long, each.. so...

  12. #10
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    usa
    Posts
    6
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default

    sorry 2-1/2 inches is probably the shortest I can go. Are drill blanks stainless steel? I can to do volume I just need to know what stainless I need fist.

  13. #11
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Washington
    Posts
    276
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    107
    Likes (Received)
    146

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Milland View Post
    Umm - it'd be a right PITB, and not give a great cylindrical shape when done. Much better to go with ground to size material if possible.
    If possible, no doubt. Just pointing out an alternative if 3/32 isn't readily available.

    Building a cylindrical lap isn't the quickest thing in the world, but it's probably on par, time wise, with making a D-bit reamer out of drill rod for an odd sized hole when you're in a pinch. I've done it before, doesn't take much more than 10-15 minutes once the lap is built.

    For the technique:

    CUSTOM CALIPERS PART 1 - YouTube

    Skip to 9 minutes in. Takes about 5 minutes to polish a .052 gauge pin to an even 50 thou, and he's using a solid carbide drill blank.

  14. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Maine
    Posts
    427
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    213

    Default

    If you only need one or two, just buy a 3/32 shaft from McMaster made out of 17-4 at Rc40. It's probably not economical if you need a bunch, but it's easy.

  15. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    7,881
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3919
    Likes (Received)
    3500

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jpatz18 View Post
    sorry 2-1/2 inches is probably the shortest I can go. Are drill blanks stainless steel? I can to do volume I just need to know what stainless I need fist.
    Most of the "HSS" clan are de-facto "stainless" if only as a byproduct of the alloys needed. A few don't even have significant iron in them at all, cannot 'rust', so "High Speed STEEL" is a misnomer.

    M2 and M42 are common as drill blanks but length in typical 'sets' varies by diameter.
    HSS Gage pins are another option.

    Downside is that either of those costs a great deal more than longer precision-ground stock that you'd at least have to cut to length and de-burr.

    I brought them onto the menu because we otherwise tend to think our only 'stainless' choices have to be 3XX or 4XX.

    Not so.

    Your project, your decision as to convenience vs cost.

  16. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Clev, OH
    Posts
    256
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    36
    Likes (Received)
    73

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jpatz18 View Post
    I am trying to find the hardest stainless steel (round rod) in 3/32. I tried 303 but its just way to soft. I am trying to reduplicate a piece. Its slightly magnetic, but not hardened by any means. Just hard after its pressed in place. They call it spring steel, but it doesn't rust. I am also finding it hard to find any stainless in 3/32. There part is has round rod 5/64 (stainless)
    We need more information:
    1) How long is your piece?
    2) What is the hardness of the existing part? "Hard" stainless can be 30-60 HRC
    3) Why do you need stainless, or more importantly what environment does this pin need to live up to? Stainless steels are designed for particular environments. Not every alloy will work in every environment.
    4) How big is your need? You want one, two, or a couple dozen of these you get a different answer than if you want thousands.

  17. #15
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Washington
    Posts
    276
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    107
    Likes (Received)
    146

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Monarchist View Post
    Most of the "HSS" clan are de-facto "stainless" if only as a byproduct of the alloys needed. A few don't even have significant iron in them at all, cannot 'rust', so "High Speed STEEL" is a misnomer.

    M2 and M42 are common as drill blanks but length in typical 'sets' varies by diameter.
    HSS Gage pins are another option.

    Downside is that either of those costs a great deal more than longer precision-ground stock that you'd at least have to cut to length and de-burr.

    I brought them onto the menu because we otherwise tend to think our only 'stainless' choices have to be 3XX or 4XX.

    Not so.

    Your project, your decision as to convenience vs cost.
    I have to disagree - M42 only has about 4% chromium. You need at least 13% chromium in an iron alloy to create the passivation layer necessary to prevent corrosion.

    I've got a mushroom knife I ground out of a piece of Mo-Max, it's definitely not corrosion resistant to any significant extent.

    D2 might get you where you need to go, that's got 12% Cr. Not sure where you'd want it as far as hardness goes, though. In its fully annealed state from the mill, it's going to be spheroidized (tiny carbides all bound up in a ferrite matrix. ie, cementite). At full hardness, all the carbon will be in the form of martensite and carbides, and at 12% Cr there's not enough in there to have an excess. I'm gunna pull a # out of my ass and say 40 HRC.

  18. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Utah
    Posts
    1,610
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    494
    Likes (Received)
    791

    Default

    Something makes me think this person really has no idea what he needs. Sorry if I am wrong. Answer the questions in post #14 and much of that may be cleared up. For example if your part is going to live in salt water, then you are going to need a SS different than 303 regardless of the hardness. Is it hardness you are after, or toughness? I would think with any kind of quantity I would just get 17-4 TGP and it would be plenty hard and tough, if it doesn't work you know what failed and have a better question to ask.

    R

  19. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    N. GA- 33.992N , -83.72W usa
    Posts
    3,177
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    22
    Likes (Received)
    605

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Monarchist View Post
    Most of the "HSS" clan are de-facto "stainless" if only as a byproduct of the alloys needed. A few don't even have significant iron in them at all, cannot 'rust', so "High Speed STEEL" is a misnomer.
    .
    I guess that explains my drawer full of rusty old scrap m-2 and m7 drills and m-42 endmills .....

    never seen rust on t-15 though....must be stainless! (the most expensive stainless?)


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •