How can I remove JB Weld?
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  1. #1
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    I have an assembly that consists of two aluminum parts and a stainless steel cable. After it was put together, it was potted with JB Weld to keep the cable from moving around. I need to disassemble the parts without damaging them to replace the cable. The assembly will easily fit in a coffee cup.

    Any suggestions on how to remove the JB Weld?

    Roger

  2. #2
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    Heat it up with a propane torch.

  3. #3
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    I agree with the heat. Maybe even a small oven. Less high heat shock. JRouche

  4. #4
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    Yuck!! That sounds stinky. I was hoping someone would suggest a solvent. Acetone maybe?

    Roger

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    When there are no easy solutions, why insist on looking for one? You have heat, solvent action, or excavation to remove the JB weld to separate the alum parts and cable. All have their yuk factors. Be a man, pick a method, and do the job.

  6. #6
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    "Be a man, pick a method, and do the job."


    Yay Forrest!


    "The assembly will easily fit in a coffee cup. "


    Yay Winchman!

  7. #7
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    I've never used JB Weld but I'm starting to like it allready...

    If ya wanted to take it apart...why the hell didja put it together with JB Weld?

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  9. #8
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    I found it handy for filling the slot & keyway in a taper lock hub so I could bore it out to fit a bigger shaft. Kept the hub from compressing in the chuck and seemed to help a bit w/ the interrupted cut.

    Once done I heated w/ a propane torch and scraped out the JB weld, came out like air dried clay. Didn't take all that much heat either- probably only need a few hundred degrees.

    Greg

  10. #9
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    Greg, that's a good idea but when I bore taper lock hubs I use a shim in the slot to keep it from compressing undersize. On small hubs the JB weld may work better.

  11. #10
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    I think I prefer the shim idea, the burned JB weld and torch left the hub a bit dirty...

    Greg

  12. #11
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    (Google JB Weld, select the company site, see that there's an FAQ, select that page and read - about 2 minutes.
    -OR-
    Post question on forum, experience significant delay and slights to manhood hours if not days.)

    From the FAQ on the JB Weld web-site:
    Q: How can I remove J-B Weld after it is fully cured?

    A: When fully cured, J-B Weld can only be removed by grinding or filing it off, or by directly heating the product above the 600 degree maximum temperature threshold.

    Might I also suggest experimenting on a piece of scrap to get a feel for the process?

    John

  13. #12
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    JB Weld is an epoxy which cures by an exothermic reaction. Adding heat in essence forces an overcure. A well directed jet of hot air is used in this manner to remove conformal epoxy coatings on circuit boards, with the result that the coating turns to a coarse powder which is easily removed by a brush.

    [ 08-30-2006, 10:52 PM: Message edited by: Motomoron ]

  14. #13
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    I'm with the heat crowd. If my experience with aircraft structural epoxies is any indicator, acetone will be about as effective as Perrier water, except that it will rot your liver if you get it on you.


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