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  1. #1
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    Default Marion 7820-M Walking Dragline


    I normally pose in front of machines that I take photos of to show scale, but in this case I had to use our Jeep Liberty! This is a Marion model 7820-M walking dragline, named "Brutus". Brutus lives in West Pittsburg, PA in a limestone quarry.




    As big as this bucket is, two of them would fit inside the bucket of Big Muskie.


    There is a ceiling fan inside the cab of Brutus.

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    Road trip!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    For my brothers 40th birthday we drove to see Walter Snowfighters. I know where the next one is.

    And a lot closer.

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    That might be Brutus but it's not Big Brutus!

    Big Brutus, Inc.

    Can't these people come up with some different names? I guess it's like when you meet someone with a dog named Moose. How original....

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    I got a tour of a big drag line while it was in operation removing over burden. Perched near the edge of the pit it was terrifing the way that thing shimmied, shook, and dipped towards the pit every time it took a bite..........Bob

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    Now google"Where's my Dozer". An oldie but a goodie...............

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    impressive,
    nothing quite like the Big Muskie thou

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    Quote Originally Posted by BMyers View Post
    impressive,
    nothing quite like the Big Muskie thou
    I remember reading about that in my "Weekly Reader"

    240? railroad cars to deliver it.

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    In 1999 this dragline slid down a 70 foot embankment, causing significant damage and severely injuring the operator. The operator was awarded over six million dollars as a result of the accident.

    Here it is in operation:

    YouTube - 7820 7820 walking/digging

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    Quote Originally Posted by BMyers View Post
    impressive, nothing quite like the Big Muskie thou

    Too bad they only saved the bucket of Big Muskie!






    Rex

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    I wonder what that monster eats? Diesel, diesel/electric, or straight electric?
    I can't imagine friction clutches on a machine that big, so I assume it's electric.

    Interesting to see that thing at work - not at all like pond clearing with a smaller dragline - you cast the bucket out as far as you can while remaining on shore. This guy just flops it.

    Interesting, too, that a Mexican company owns a quarry in Pennsylvania. Thanks for the pictures!

  11. #11
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    [QUOTE=GregSY;1370875]That might be Brutus but it's not Big Brutus!

    Big Brutus, Inc.

    I saw Big Brutus run as a kid and used to pull tractors at the site where it resides. It was all electric and had dozers to pull its cord around!

    Empty shell really now. All the motors etc. were removed .

    Sorry for the hijack!!

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    What's interesting about Big Brutus is they let you take the stairs all the way up the boom....I can't believe someone hasn't fallen off yet.

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    Big Muskie had more than one bucket, so it could be rebuilt while the machine was working. Here is a photo of one being moved to a new location by a 6 pack of D9s and D8s.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails dscn2246-1200.jpg  

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    Greg, they stopped the climb to the top of Big Brutus about 5 years ago.

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    Dang...the good things never last.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sa100 View Post
    I wonder what that monster eats? Diesel, diesel/electric, or straight electric?
    I can't imagine friction clutches on a machine that big, so I assume it's electric.

    Interesting to see that thing at work - not at all like pond clearing with a smaller dragline - you cast the bucket out as far as you can while remaining on shore. This guy just flops it.

    Interesting, too, that a Mexican company owns a quarry in Pennsylvania. Thanks for the pictures!

    They are straight electric. We have several draglines like that at the coal mines here. I never worked on them very much, but they are sure impressive machines.

    It is interesting to look at the statistics between shovels and draglines. The Big Brutus that is linked in this thread had a bucket capacity of 150 tons. The Big Muskie had a bucket capacity of 320 tons.

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    If you are really into big mining machines, stripping shovels as well as large draglines, take a tour through this site.

    <- The Stripmine ->.

    On the left of the home page is a link to the forum and there are tons of photos, some current and some historical that are part of this site. There are also a lot of videos on Youtube of the older large machines in action. Many of them have been posted by a Mr. Walter Bennett.

    These days the removal of overburden is handled by draglines, as they have certain advantages over the large stripping shovels. The primary one is a much longer boom, so the spoil can be piled higher, which is a real advantage on limited acreage.

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    11 Bravo are you sure about that? I think draglinea are rated in cubic yards, not tons. It may be a small difference here but proper units should be used. Notice that all of a sudden the media reports the spill form the Macondo Well in gallons, notbarrels. An increase of 42 X to the ignorant public.

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    If I could only find my pictures, I was at Big Muskie the day before scrapping started. Somewhere I have pics of my then 1 year old daughter sitting on the bucket drag chain. What a machine. Now, I find that I am only 6 hours from Big Brutus. I see a road trip in my future. I have seen the largest dragline, now I can see the largest shovel. Cool !

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by tdmidget View Post
    11 Bravo are you sure about that? I think draglinea are rated in cubic yards, not tons. It may be a small difference here but proper units should be used. Notice that all of a sudden the media reports the spill form the Macondo Well in gallons, notbarrels. An increase of 42 X to the ignorant public.
    You are of course correct. The Big Muskie had a bucket of 220 cubic yards. I just pulled a typical overburden load so the comparison would be like units.

    Several sites out there give the capacity for the Big Muskie as 320 tons. A few like this one list both capacity in cubic yards and an average of what that would weigh.

    Big [email protected]


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