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  1. #21
    Bill D is offline Titanium
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    Why are you mowing 10 acres? better option is to let someone use there machines and time to cut hay. You either take some hay or some money in exchange. Or let them run livestock to mow it down naturally.
    Bill D.

  2. #22
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    gbent is offline Diamond
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    For those of you saying green is to expensive, look at the resale. Any green tractor (except for articulated 4wd) over 20 years old in nice condition sells used today for more money than it sold for brand new. No other tractor brand can say that.

    You can own that green paint for nothing more than interest on the money.

    The 1020 or 2020 Deere (New Generation, '63-71) that you are looking for may be hard to find.

  3. #23
    grandtools is offline Banned
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    I personally hated the Ford 8N/9N's the flat head engines suck, no live hyd or or PTO. The later fords, like to 600/800 series were vastly improved in all areas. Later Ford 3 cylinders were all good tractors. But I think if you want the most tractor for your $$, best choice is the International 300, 350 series. Loads of power, live hyd, independant PTO, these tractors have it all, and are very durable. In this part of the country you can buy them for about $1200 to $2000, the price of a tired 8N. About the only problem they had was the TA (torque Amplifier) , but if it goes bad, you can just ignore it and use the tractor in direct drive. The 350 Diesels are also trouble, but there were very few made anyway. The 340 and 460's were based on the sme design with squared off sheet metal and different engines, but equally good tractors. There are tons of good tractors out there, M F , the J D's etc. Im just saying for what you get for the money it's hard to beat those Internationals.

  4. #24
    SteveF is offline Stainless
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill D View Post
    Or let them run livestock to mow it down naturally.
    Bill D.
    Horses don't eat where they crap and they eat around the weeds so you still have to mow for weed control. Goats also skip the weeds if they have enough other choices.

    J. Elliott - I'll just add that you need to make sure the mower blades are regularly sharpened as it makes a huge difference.

    Steve.

  5. #25
    jkilroy is offline Diamond
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    Green isn't too expensive because of the purchase price, its too expensive to keep running. I've owned JD, Kubota and Ford and the JD's needed the most work BY FAR to keep running. Can't tell you about Kubota parts prices, never had to buy any in 13 or so years of use of the oldest.

  6. #26
    Mud's Avatar
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    Mud is offline Diamond
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    I've owned JD, Kubota and Ford and the JD's needed the most work BY FAR to keep running.
    What models? Full size or mini?

  7. #27
    reality checker is offline Aluminum
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    Default Ford 2N-9N-8N= South Bend?

    I have several , I think of the Fords like the South Bend Lathe of tractors. They are not the biggest, best, fastest or have the most features, but they have survived because they work forever. Designed on a drafting board and made with molten iron and sweat. Machined where they should be and cast where they could be.

    The fords probably have more attachments available since they invented or stole the 3 point hitch, they are about the most universal thing you could own in a tractor for about 1500.00. From plowing, discing, front end loader, snow blower, backblade, brushhog, ther eare track kits, step up and down aux trasnmissions and about 20 other attachments they can do just about anything.

    They are underpowered with their flatheads, few moving parts, the part cost to re-sleeve one is shockingly cheap, It could be done by a farmer in a day or two. They have no live PTO, they have many limitations like a South Bend 10k. The last one rolled off the line in 1952 making it about 57 years old. The first ones were born in 1939, I have one of those and everytime I use it harder than I should, I think about the guys who built it (The young ones would be in their 90's) and what they would think if they knew someone would be demanding that it start and run in -25f temps to push mountians of snow from a long driveway to make sure we get to work in the morning. Then running it hard pulling a 5' brush hog thru more brush than it should in the summer.

    Are there any other machines that are so prolific? I wonder what the survival rate of a Kubota will be after 70 years? How about resale?

    I went to an auction once and a 2N with a loader sold for about 1800.00. I was standing next to the old farmer as he watched his accumulation of life being dispersed and drift away, he whispered to me that he had paid about 800.00 for it new in the 40's and farmed 80 acres with it since.

    As far as the complaint about not holding the mower at the right height, on your tractor, there should be a lever under the seat, in one position it holds the implement at any level it is set at using the lift lever, in the other position, it holds a plow at a constant depth so the field is evenly plowed. If the under seat selector is not in the correct position, it will be impossible to get the mower to hold position.

    The 9N and 2N tractors did not have the lever to select between holding the implement at the correct height so you used a set of chains from the base of the third member to support the mower wherever you wanted it to hang.

    As with anything farmers own, there are retrofits to make a simple linkage between th elever to raise the lift adn the lift arm. if the lift sags the lever makes it raise, simple, elegant. Kind of a feedback linkage. There is a way to do whatever you want, or not.

    If you decide to get a new tractor, be sure and pass your Ford along, it has many more years of work to do for someone on a budget. Sell it to someone young, so the tractor and new owner can spend some time together before it is time for the tractor to move on. The only thing that really kills them is lack of use.

  8. #28
    Tonytn36 is offline Diamond
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cuda View Post
    No suggestions, I have a Kubota B21 that I like a lot but paid 10K for it used, go to http://www.tractorhouse.com and check prices, they have thousands of tractor listings.
    Checking prices on that site, Dad's tractor is worth roughly the same money or more now, as it was when he bought it brand new in '79.

  9. #29
    gunbuilder is offline Aluminum
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    Default Tractors

    Quote Originally Posted by jkilroy View Post
    Green isn't too expensive because of the purchase price, its too expensive to keep running. I've owned JD, Kubota and Ford and the JD's needed the most work BY FAR to keep running. ...
    I can agree with that, the other thing is the JD tractor uses about half the diesel fuel it drinks the rest goes out the exhaust stack. I can't stand breathing the JD smoke anymore. I don't have a problem with the IH or the DB, just the JD 4020.

    Quote Originally Posted by gbent View Post
    For those of you saying green is to expensive, look at the resale. Any green tractor (except for articulated 4wd) over 20 years old in nice condition sells used today for more money than it sold for brand new. No other tractor brand can say that.

    You can own that green paint for nothing more than interest on the money.
    You could be right if you don't have to run it through the shop. My brother had a 4020 overhauled by an independent shop, cost as much as the 4020 when Dad bought it.

    I assume you weren't talking about Oliver (the other green tractors).

    Ox said "I believe David Brown was a Case product - for whatever reason. ???"
    David Brown tractors were made in Britain, sold by J.I. Case. I have not had a problem getting parts for my DB, just go to the Case/New Holland dealer.

    What ever you do don't get a WD Allis Chalmers, one of the happiest days of my life was the day the WD left the place for the last time. Not saying all Allis Chalmers are bad, I just don't like that vintage AC.

    Thanks,
    Paul

  10. #30
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    Patrick Black is offline Aluminum
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    Default Adding a bit about the 8N

    As far as the complaint about not holding the mower at the right height, on your tractor, there should be a lever under the seat, in one position it holds the implement at any level it is set at using the lift lever, in the other position, it holds a plow at a constant depth so the field is evenly plowed. If the under seat selector is not in the correct position, it will be impossible to get the mower to hold position.
    Yep, the little position control lever should be up for bush-hogging (position control) - down for plowing (draft control). Up will set the implement relative to the position of the touch control lever. Down will set it relative to the draft in which case the touch control lever determines how much draft it takes to raise the implement up a bit to reduce the load. If the position control lever is up and it still won't stay at one level, then something in the pump needs attention. The easy button fix is to add check chains like Reality Checker described for 9n and 2n's to maintain a constant level and not worry about the hydraulics.

    FWIW, it takes me 2-1/2 hrs to bush hog 5 acres grass with 5-ft hog, 3rd gear, 2.5-3 gal fuel on a 1950 8n. If you want to cover more ground faster, then a bigger (more hp) tractor with a larger cutter is in order.

    Pat Black

    ps. Reality Checker - good analogy re: N-series = South Bend

  11. #31
    Greg White is online now Titanium
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    Default Ford /N.holland here

    I have a 1995 1320,3 cyl. 27 H.P. slushbox ,4 wheel drive,usta beat it pretty hard before I retired,6 ft. hog on back I put it and me up for hire for 3 or 4 years in a row,5 ft. tiller,hyd. post hole maker,the work paid for tractor and trailer,shes all mine now,she sleeps long hours in the barn now, I bought it new,would do it again,I am sure it aint worth much now money wise,but it is very valuable to me.adapted a Fordson buzz saw on back,with the "power pulley thingy"6" flat beltdrive,I Will say it has been mostly trouble free.
    Best of luck,tractors are alota fun iffin you aint on it all day.
    GW

  12. #32
    Jeffw5555 is offline Plastic
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    I spent far too many hours in my youth on tractor seats of various colors, and would not ever, ever want to (did I say ever) get back on the seat of a Ford N series tractor.

    I take offense to the comparison of the N series Fords to South Bend lathes......I think it tarnishes SB's excellent reputation.

    The day my father sold the 8N was one of the happiest days of my life....

    I simply don't understand why anyone would use one. Haven't you tried any other brand?

    My current tractor is a 4WD JD 970 compact, with loader and backhoe attachments. My wife and I tag-team our 7 acres of grass; her on the Scag zero-turn and me on the 970 with a 6 ft Woods finish mower. We can knock it out in little over an hour.

    If I had an old 8N, it would take a couple days to mow, unpleasant ones at that......

  13. #33
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    crowfly is offline Aluminum
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    After consulting with many of my associates we have reached a unanimous decision. The best tractor for a small farm is without a doubt,,,,,,, a small tractor.

  14. #34
    fdew is offline Plastic
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    Default The best mowing tractor is a mower

    I have a farm tractor and I really enjoy it, but if all you are doing is mowing, the best small tractor for that is a commercial mower. It will be faster, cheaper, and more comfortable. and you can get a good quality used one for your price. I have a Ferris and I am very pleased with it but there are many others.
    http://www.ferrisindustries.com/page...?product_id=24

  15. #35
    Ox's Avatar
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    Ox is offline Diamond
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    You can come to my kinns auction house near here and fetch what you want - or brouse through their site and see what their going for. I usta stuff the envelopes with those tractor reports as a kid. Reported as the Werlds Largest Farm Machinery Auction.

    Although I bleed green - when it comes to the older toys - I like the red "lettered" ones. I have a Farmall A (that hasn't been started in ... well I was gunna say 10 yrs ... but it's 15 if it's a day and closing in on 20 yrs by now.) But these are nice machines for mowing as well. The slightly smaller sibling - the "Cub" (not cub cadet) are regularly - if not usually founds with a nice Woods deck under them. The Cub also has hydro lift as well. My A had this exhaust blockoff lift setup that I ripped off 30 yrs ago. I did have trouble picking up the one row cultivators by hand as an 11/12 yr old kid tho. I used it for a few acres of strawberrys, sweet corn, etc.


    I think Jeff had a worn out 8n as they aint THAT bad usually. ??? Loose steering tends to be an issue with them.



    -------------

    Think Snow Eh!
    Ox

  16. #36
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    Funny, OX, I have a Super A as my mowing tractor with the Woods 59". It is sooo much better thant the F-cub I mowed with many years ago.

    I only do 3 acres but I can see using something like an H or M for something like 10ac that could put enough power to a wider finishing mower. Here's where the live PTO discussion starts but for the relatively low price, wide array of replacement and good/used parts, plus the nearly bulletproof durability, I doo also like the red stuff.

    There's also two competing theories developing...one is to buy a small number of cheap old tractors with dedicated/specific purposes, or buy a high-dollar new one which can do all sorts of things.

  17. #37
    Ox's Avatar
    Ox
    Ox is offline Diamond
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    Super A has hydraulics as well eh? You don't find them available too often.

    95% of the time you will find me with a green hat on.


    -----------

    Think Snow Eh!
    Ox

  18. #38
    sa100 is offline Hot Rolled
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    While I am not a farmer, I have had years of experience with many used tractors,, and I believe that the best all around machine in its size range is the old 4 cylinder Ford overhead valve series that replaced the N's. I agree that the N's had their limitations but in my view the 600/800 2000/4000 tractors resolved most of them. These machines are a bit on the light side so they're not the best for use with a loader, but that's not what the original poster says he wants. These Fords are extremely simple and robust. If you get one with a Sherman step up/step down three speed auxiliary, you will have twelve speeds which are plenty for any use. I had a 4000 with a loader and I used it for many years. It got fearsome traction with the weighted 28" rear wheels and was miserly with a tank of gas. I loved that tractor and only sold it because as I said earlier it was a bit too light for the loader work I was doing, and because the local Ford dealer was egging me on, telling me how much happier I would be with a newer machine. I sold the 4000 and replaced it with an early 4400 diesel loader. What a mistake! The 4400 is heavy, slow and underpowered. It's got 24" rear rubber and even the diff lock doesn't keep it form digging itself in. I'd trade it in a moment for my faithful 4000! btw, since New Holland took over, the British Fords are in my
    opinion orphans. What parts the dealers can identify and find are outrageously expensive. The earlier series, though, can be serviced with reproduction parts that are available everywhere and at rock bottom prices. Avoid the three-cylinder Fords!

    I've also owned other makes although no JD. I've run and looked at 'em, though, and in my fumble opinion they are too complicated and heavy for what they have to do. Remember, the more gadgets you have, the more there is to go wrong. I agree with a prior poster that Internationals can be a good choice, given their reliability and low, low price. The same may be true for general purpose Olivers, such as the 550's, although I have no idea if/where you'd get parts for 'em.

    I have no personal experience with the Kubotas but anecdotally, I think they make great conversation pieces. If you work 'em hard (especially the 4WD models) expect things to go snap, crackle and pop and lots of money to exit your pockets before the thing moves again under its own power. They're probably also too small to offer any productivity gains over the old Ford N.

    Things to look for: Avoid a loader unless you absolutely need one - they make the front end heavy and wreak havoc with maneuverability. Power steering is a must if you are dodging around stumps, etc. Avoid three and four speed machines, you will always be going too slow or too fast for the job. An independent PTO is nice but the overrunning clutch is equally good. I think that gas engines offer more advantages than shortcomings to the occasional user, and they are easier/cheaper to fix when something goes wrong. I prefer the downward exhaust over the pipe that sticks up into the sky. It directs the fumes back and away from the operator and doesn't snag low-hanging tree branches and the like. Avoid slush pump drives like the Ford Selecto-Speed and the International hydrostatics. Costly to fix and who knows what parts are available? Keep things simple.

    Good luck with your mowing. Let us know what you decide.

    Steve

  19. #39
    BobC is offline Aluminum
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ox View Post
    The 8n just aint as good as it's reputation.

    Underpowered and nnon-live PTO hinder it. However the low C/G is great for ditch banks and the like...

    Ox
    Yes. the 8n has some limitations compared to newer tractors but is still a very useful machine for many jobs. I grew up with an 8n in the 50's. The one I now own for more than 30 years starts easily, has a good 3-pt hitch and lift and does all I ask of it. I do have a newer and larger Ford 3910 that I use for heavier jobs. If I were only mowing a 10A field, presumably with a Bush-hog type mower, I see no reason the 8N should not be satisfactory. A racheting adaptor on the pto shaft should be used for safety reasons. It will keep you from running through the fence sometime (don't ask how I know).

    Bob

  20. #40
    Henro is offline Aluminum
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    HI,

    I don't think it was mentioned above...if so, sorry for missing it.

    You may want to stop by www.tractorbynet.com and ask for advice there, as well as enjoy the wealth of knowledge/experience that is there, similar to what is here on the machining side...

    I am sure you will find the tractorbynet site very useful...

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