One of my daughter's alumni is making these - Page 7
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  1. #121
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    If you can get it classified as 'art' then common sense and economics no longer apply.

    Examples? Sure!

    Here is a picture of a painting that sold at auction in 2012 for $75 Million Dollars. Yep - Seven-Five Million:

    03470392.jpg

    Ok, three, maybe four colors in rough rectangles - takes a lot of time, effort, and practice, right?

    How about someone goes out with the boys, has a few too many, and accidentally knocks over that shelf in the garage with all of the paint cans on it, and it happens to land on canvas? We're all capable of that, right?

    splatter.jpg

    Well, next time that happens to you, make sure you list the end result for sale, instead of just throwing it in the trash. You might just get $140 Million Dollars for it.

    So 800 bucks for a fancy fidget spinner, or 150 bucks for a stupid top made by a knifemaker who sells stupidly overpriced knives is all small potatoes. At least those people made something that took more skill than a kindergarten art student or a drunk falling down.

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  3. #122
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Welden View Post
    I'm supposed to believe he is making a killing and selling chess sets for six figures, but it doesn't make sense for him to upgrade from hobby grade shit in his basement? Sorry, no...
    I have two sides to my business - one side is production parts that I want to crank out in volume, the other is boutique that I crank out in tiny numbers. The latter sells for very high prices.

    I wish I could sell the boutique parts in large volume, but I can't. The buyers are all about the process and the reputation of the maker and the "story" behind the thing they are buying. I make them on CNC machines, but the photography is black and white, making the workshop look grizzled, etc. The parts might be programmed in MasterCAM and machined on a modern VMC, but the photos on the website show brass pins in an old Southbend lathe. It very well might be the pins were just given a nice finish with a scotch brite pad on that machine - but that's the part that the buyers like to see and that builds the story.

    My point is - just because he is using those machines, doesn't mean he can't afford new machines. He is selling a story and he is selling himself. A workshop that looks like a surgery operating room with a pristine epoxied concrete floor, him wearing an impeccably pressed company uniform and an impossibly clean 5-axis DMG mill humming away in the center of the room next to a stainless steel table with a row of perfectly spaced, perfectly machined parts in front of it doesn't sell the same story as a guy sweating for hours cranking handles on good ol' American iron using buckets of raw talent and drive and determination to make this superior handcrafted trinket just for YOU.

    And some people will pay for that.

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  5. #123
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    Quote Originally Posted by SRT Mike View Post
    My point is - just because he is using those machines, doesn't mean he can't afford new machines. He is selling a story and he is selling himself. A workshop that looks like a surgery operating room with a pristine epoxied concrete floor, him wearing an impeccably pressed company uniform and an impossibly clean 5-axis DMG mill humming away in the center of the room next to a stainless steel table with a row of perfectly spaced, perfectly machined parts in front of it doesn't sell the same story as a guy sweating for hours cranking handles on good ol' American iron using buckets of raw talent and drive and determination to make this superior handcrafted trinket just for YOU.

    And some people will pay for that.
    SRT Mike gets it.

    When you get into the high-end world of quasi art pieces, people are buying the story of the object as much as they are buying the object themselves.


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