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  1. #21
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    If you don't need to see the sky, have a look at these. Avail. to R20, osha compliant for fall hazard protection, etc. We use this stuff on schools - about to have one about 40' long dropped on this month.
    Kalwall | S-line Skylights

  2. #22
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    Feb 2001
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    We have a Kalwall in the ceiling of our master bath. It was speced as one with thermal breaks in the internal I-beams. I think the contractor cheaped out or goofed up, and got one without thermal breaks, because the underside sweats badly where the I-beams touch the interior panel. I am working on the issue. It is no fun having cold drops of condensate fall on you while shaving. My other concern is rot where the condensate runs downslope to the lower wood curb. If you go the Kalwall route, confirm that you will not have problems with condensation. The Kalwall skylight lets in lovely filtered light over a large ceiling area, but if it turns out that I actually did get a Kalwall with thermal breaks, and they sweat like I experience, no way would I recommend one for a residence. The internal structure is inaccessible, and there is no nameplate that I can find, to confirm the internal structure. I am working with the Kalwall supplier to resolve the identity.

  3. #23
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    Digger Doug no offense taken. I was just saying that local conditions and codes will vary and need to be accounted for. I looked up Erie PA and its average annual snow fall is under 10'. So about 1/4 of last years snow in Tahoe. I looked it up once and calculated roof snow loads in the Tahoe area are over 200 pounds per square foot in some areas. I would assume any skylight would have to be designed to carry that same snow loading indefinitely.
    But I live where it does not snow so I may be all wrong. Also I have no idea what sesmic loads are expected for a skylights here in the west, if any. The older skylights had to use glass with wire in it so they would not shatter if broken? I do not see that used anymore so I guess glass technology has changed.
    Bill D.
    Modesto, ca
    Last edited by Bill D; 01-03-2018 at 11:31 AM.

  4. #24
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    I understood the wire in the glass was to keep it together longer in a fire, to delay the chimney effect through the skylight.

    Speaking of fire, our architect's sales pitch for the Kalwall was that it could support the weight of a firefighter. Who knew?!?

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by rklopp View Post
    I understood the wire in the glass was to keep it together longer in a fire, to delay the chimney effect through the skylight.

    Speaking of fire, our architect's sales pitch for the Kalwall was that it could support the weight of a firefighter. Who knew?!?
    The old school classroom doors that have a small window to peep into the class all those windows had chicken wire in them. I have no idea why.
    Hard to believe they can support a firefighter. Maybe it is like the movies where they support then hero but start cracking quickly until he can save himself and get off while the bad guy falls through. A firefighter would hopefully get off a soon as he realized he was standing on top of the skylight.
    I believe the glass floor deck at the grand canyon had some glass crack within the year.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tony Quiring View Post
    The Fresno Sams club has buckets scattered all over the store every time it rains...

    Leaks galore since new and it is not that old.

    It seems these window systems are common in some places and there are posted existing vendors.

    Assuming those vendors may have engineering support so suggest using their contact page to ask for advise

    It seems they would be building to fit as these may not be a normal stock item so they must have application limitations or other guidelines that provide a "system approach" to insure it works.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I337Z using Tapatalk
    Were the Fresno roofers able to read the instructions?

    It doesn’t matter what language, were the instructions provided?

    Did the crew tend to harass and make fun of anyone reading the documentation?

    I have a good friend that won’t read the instructions for his home fixup tasks.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill D View Post
    The old school classroom doors that have a small window to peep into the class all those windows had chicken wire in them. I have no idea why.
    Hard to believe they can support a firefighter. Maybe it is like the movies where they support then hero but start cracking quickly until he can save himself and get off while the bad guy falls through. A firefighter would hopefully get off a soon as he realized he was standing on top of the skylight.
    I believe the glass floor deck at the grand canyon had some glass crack within the year.
    The Kalwall is several inches thick, and the aluminum I-beams inside are on about a 1'x2' grid and are as tall as the Kalwall is thick, so I fully expect a 5' x 8' Kalwall (which is about the size of mine) would support a person.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by bhigdog View Post
    Sky lights are spawn of the devil. Roof it over....................Bob
    A solar panel driving some LED lighting does away with a lot of the drainage problems, sealing issues and ends up being a lot more flexible regarding positioning internally and externally. There are none of the issues with structural strength or insulation and would suit a rental property, cost is about the same or cheaper and all you give up is a view of the clouds.


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