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Thread: OT- How to quickly warm up cup of distilled water in the bathroom ?

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    Milacron's Avatar
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    Default OT- How to quickly warm up cup of distilled water in the bathroom ?

    Coffee cup warmer too slow. Guess I need a tiny microwave but don't know of any small enough. Need water warm, not hot. Use= one cup every morning. Ideas ?

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    bosleyjr's Avatar
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    Well, if you are using this for saline lavage (Neti pot or squirt bottle), and your water system is chlorinated, you probably can use tap water. I do. Been doing so for several years.

    Otherwise, a cheap plug-in coffee maker or tea pot off e-bay or from the Borg (Walmart) would be my path.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bosleyjr View Post
    Well, if you are using this for saline lavage (Neti pot or squirt bottle), and your water system is chlorinated, you probably can use tap water. I do. Been doing so for several years.
    Well, now you have something new to worry about No need to thank me

    The Well Column September 3, 2012, 5:20 pm112 CommentsRare Infection Prompts Neti Pot Warning
    By TARA PARKER

    Neti pots — those odd teapotlike vessels used to wash out the nasal passage — have won legions of fans who rely on them for relief from allergies, congestion and colds.
    But now, after two cases of a deadly brain infection were linked to neti pots, government health officials have issued new warnings about using them safely.
    The Food and Drug Administration last month reported on two cases in Louisiana in which patients contracted infections after using neti pots filled with tap water. The culprit was an amoeba called Naegleria fowleri, which is commonly found in lakes, rivers and hot springs.
    This kind of infection is exceedingly rare, but it usually occurs when people get water up the nose after swimming or diving in lakes or rivers; Naegleria fowleri can travel from the nose into the brain, where it causes primary amoebic meningoencephalitis, a disease that destroys brain tissue and is almost always fatal. In 123 known cases from 1962 to 2011 in the United States, only one person has survived, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
    Last year, Louisiana state health officials reported on two unrelated deaths — of a 20-year-old man and a 51-year-old woman who were believed to have been infected by tap water later found to be contaminated with Naegleria fowleri. Both had used tap water in a neti pot. (Because stomach acid kills the amoeba, drinking contaminated water does not lead to infection.)
    As a result, the F.D.A. has issued new warnings reminding consumers to use distilled or filtered water in a neti pot. They can use bottled water, or they can boil water and let it cool before using.
    Doctors say the new warnings should not dissuade people from using a neti pot, which can be a safe and effective home remedy for allergies and congestion.
    To use a neti pot, a person mixes water with a saline packet to create a mild saline solution. Leaning over a sink, the user inserts the spout of the pot into a nostril, allowing the water to wash up inside the nasal passage and flow out the other nostril. Nasal lavage bottles can also be used, although it is important not to squeeze the bottle too hard.
    “Initially it’s a weird sensation, but if you’re congested and it washes out some of that stuff, you’re much less miserable,” said Dr. Rohit K. Katial, a professor of medicine and allergy specialist at National Jewish Health, a respiratory hospital based in Denver. “People end up really liking it because they feel refreshed — it’s wellness with water.”
    Several studies show that regular nasal irrigation can reduce symptoms of allergies and congestion. One 2008 study found that children with severe allergies were less reliant on steroid nasal sprays if they regularly rinsed their nasal passages.
    “One of the primary functions of the nose is filtration,” Dr. Katial said. “That’s where you capture all the pollens and particulates. Irrigation is the way to wash some of that out, and we think it’s very beneficial and we use it fairly extensively in our patients.”
    Doctors say it’s important to keep the risk of Naegleria fowleri contamination in perspective. Most cases are in the South, although some have been documented in the Midwest and as far north as Minnesota. Millions of people swim and dive in lakes and rivers each year, yet from 2002 to 2011 there were only 32 reported Naegleria fowleri infections, according to the disease centers. By comparison, from 1996 to 2005, the most recent period with available data, the United States had more than 36,000 drowning deaths.
    With neti pots and other forms of nasal lavage, the greater risk comes from improper cleaning. Bacteria or fungi can form on the spout of a used neti pot or in a partly used nasal lavage bottle. Regular use of an improperly cleaned neti pot or contaminated lavage bottle can lead to chronic irritation or allergies.
    And like toothbrushes, neti pots shouldn’t be shared with anyone. People with a compromised immune system should consult a doctor before using a neti pot.
    While the two recent cases of amoebic infection may be terrifying, the public should not be alarmed or fearful about freshwater swimming or neti pot use, said Dr. Philip T. Hagen, vice chairman of the Mayo Clinic’s division of preventive medicine.
    “If you talk about the general population, there are more common things to be aware of and worry about than a scary amoebic infection,” said Dr. Hagen, who is also the editor of “The Mayo Clinic Book of Home Remedies.” “It’s an opportunity to remind people to be cautious and use good cleaning approaches and maintenance of their neti pot.”

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    camscan is offline Hot Rolled
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    Thermos flask the night before?

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    Thanks for pointing this out.

    The article underscores my comment about chlorinated water - chlorine is the only common approach that maintains secondary antimicrobial action. What was not documented in this (or any other report on the web) was whether the folks that died were using (for example) well-water or chlorinated muni water. And I can't find any info on whether chlorination levels in tap water kill the organism. There's a lot of misinformation on the web (I know, shocking!), such as "my doctor told me tap water was ok so long as I use the salt - salt kills the organisms". No, salt at that level makes the organisms happy, for the same reason that proper concentrations of salt make our nasal cells happy, and unsalted water hurts. So I'm at a quandary about this. I rinse the hell out of the nozzle and the squirt bottle and hang the bottle upside down to drain and dry. I use antimicrobial hand soap to wash the thing every few weeks. But if the treated tap water has microbes in it, that's scary.

    But should I be scared? The fact that 3 people died in this manner, and that there is no treatment once infected, certainly gets one's attention. If one figures that maybe half a percent of the population uses these things, thats 1.5 million users. So the odds would appear to be about 1 in 500,000.

    There is a study that shows chronic use actually increases sinus infections: Frequent Neti Pot Use Causes More Sinus Infections - ABC News

    I think I may back off on daily use, and use a saline lavage only episodically, in response to colds, stuffy nose, or infections. And an old plug-in teapot, with a thermometer, to heat distilled water may be the safest way to do this.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bosleyjr View Post
    There is a study that shows chronic use actually increases sinus infections: Frequent Neti Pot Use Causes More Sinus Infections - ABC News
    That is interesting. I had heard or read somewhere hints of that issue, but until now never read an actual article on the problem. My issue is not so much sinus infections as it is stuffy nose if I don't irrigate. I might try backing off as well then, but suspect I won't be able to

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    jim rozen is offline Diamond
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    "up your nose with a rubber hose?"

    Maybe, not.

    We have guys here at work, they just snuff the water right up their noses from the
    sinks in the bathrooms. Not a nice habit IMO.

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    APD
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    Quote Originally Posted by bosleyjr View Post
    But should I be scared? The fact that 3 people died in this manner, and that there is no treatment once infected, certainly gets one's attention. If one figures that maybe half a percent of the population uses these things, thats 1.5 million users. So the odds would appear to be about 1 in 500,000.
    Actually, I think the odds would significantly less:

    If you consider that the most common route of infection is via swimming in lakes and rivers, I would say maybe 1/3 of the population does this routinely during the summer, in water far less clean than anything coming from municipal water and most wells. And via this more common route of infection there have been only 123 cases in 50 years of people swimming.
    If you are scared to use a Neti Pot, you should be more scared to go swimming.

    Although if I was using one daily, I would probably take some extra precaution.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Milacron View Post
    Well, now you have something new to worry about No need to thank me
    Ah, the synergy of PM!

    I posted a VERY OT warning amongst a thread on boring and facing heads about thoroughly cleaning Watercress a day ago - couldn't remember the particular bug that was to be most worried about.

    This Naegleria Fowleri , and perhaps an offshore cousin or three around the world - is the deadly one.

    And they are correct about the statistics of low overall risk.

    Still - who wants to tempt fate and become the exception?

    Back to the original question: A small microwave gets my vote hands down. Cheap, and unlike a pot or immersion rod, even if the oven itself is quite grubby - as they so often can be - the container it is heating - a fresh paper cup, even - is fairly well 'isolated' from that.

    Also MUCH easier to set to less-than-boiling, which is hard to do with most of the other devices.

    Bill

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    Quote Originally Posted by APD View Post
    If you are scared to use a Neti Pot, you should be more scared to go swimming.
    I don't think "scared" is the right word. I used one this morning with tap water even after reading the article yesterday as I'm aware the odds of a problem are miniscule. But as thermite mentions, no need to tempt fate if the precaution is cheap and easy.

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    TDegenhart is online now Stainless
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    The main issue here is to first not create more problems than we solve. Whatever you do, the solutions and equipment should be sterile. Boil water for five minutes and keep in a sterile container or buy sterile water. Use irrigating equipment that can be run through a dishwasher. Use the premixed packets of salts so as to avoid burning the nasal passages. Warming can be a challenge in that the water temperature should not be more than 100F. A small microwave would be the best choice for two reasons. They can be set rather accurately to get the right temperature, abet after some experimenting to get these settings, and the solution can be heated in the application container assuming of course that the container is not metal or something else that could not go in a microwave.

    Tom

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    David Merrill is offline Aluminum
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    Ask your doc whether a steroid nasal spray might be appropriate to your circumstances. I breathed through my mouth because of nasal congestion until about thirty years ago my doc perscribed Vancenase and I have been breathing normally through my nose ever since. Various perscription plans have over the years substituted lower cost generics, the current one being Fluticasone Propionate. Here's a link identifying some other similar products. Alternatives To Vancenase Nasal Spray - The People's Pharmacy®

    Incidentally, I've been successfully using nasal irrigation combined with OTC cold remedies for periodic sinus infections/colds since I'm allergic to several common antibiotics.

    David Merrill

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    Quote Originally Posted by David Merrill View Post
    Ask your doc whether a steroid nasal spray might be appropriate to your circumstances. l
    As per usual we are getting off topic where folks are dying to "get to the root reason" of everything rather than address the actual question... but FWIW, I use Fluticasone Propionate as well...doesn't quite do the trick for me, without irrigation as well.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Milacron View Post
    I don't think "scared" is the right word. I used one this morning with tap water even after reading the article yesterday as I'm aware the odds of a problem are miniscule. But as thermite mentions, no need to tempt fate if the precaution is cheap and easy.
    Dunno if 'irrigation' is even wot you are after with it all, but only time I needed that, it was simplest to keep an entire one-litre bottle of 'Apotheke' purchased USP-equivalent ready-made saline solution in a normally already-warm spot. In the car, back of the minibar fridge where the coils are, etc. Right now, my coffee-cup sits atop the laptop's power 'brick', right next to the CPU fan vents. Stays reasonably warm at no net extra cost.

    Bill

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    Heavey Metal is online now Titanium
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    Most welders that work for me irrigate with the saline specifically for this.

    They keep it in their tee shirt pocket where it remains at optimal temp.

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    S_W_Bausch is online now Diamond
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    Regarding quickly warming a small volume of water, I would consider a Mr. Coffee style of coffee maker (without the filters or coffee).

    To start, the decanter would have a volume of room temperature water, which would be warmed up by running a small volume of water through the heating system.

    Once you determined the ratios of water, it would be a simple matter.

    Perhaps 50/50, though our engineer members could probably arrive at a more accurate starting point.

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    richard newman is online now Stainless
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    Easiest way is to just drink it, and then I'm told it's sterile when it re-emerges.
    Oldwrench likes this.

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    Just be careful with heating distilled water in the micro wave, it can be super heated and it reacts violently. Superheating of water (Mythbusters) - YouTube

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    Quote Originally Posted by richard newman View Post
    Easiest way is to just drink it, and then I'm told it's sterile when it re-emerges.
    LOL... body temperature and probably already saline as well. One of you try that and get back to me ... just don't eat asparagus first...

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