Removing rust from car brake caliper dust seal groove
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  1. #1
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    Default Removing rust from car brake caliper dust seal groove

    What methods can anyone here recommend for removing the rust from the outer dust seal groove on cast iron brake caliper bodies?

    Also, what would be a suitable coating to prevent or at least delay the rust from returning?

    The shape of the caliper body makes access difficult for one side of the groove.

    Is it simply a case of scraping it out by hand using a suitably ground piece of steel?

    Thanks for any replies.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Webley91 View Post
    What methods can anyone here recommend for removing the rust from the outer dust seal groove on cast iron brake caliper bodies?

    Also, what would be a suitable coating to prevent or at least delay the rust from returning?

    The shape of the caliper body makes access difficult for one side of the groove.

    Is it simply a case of scraping it out by hand using a suitably ground piece of steel?

    Thanks for any replies.
    I'd use a small brass brush. I'd try clean as best as I could with whatever is most convenient but I wouldn't worry excessively.

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    For single piston calipers we used a Dremel too with a small wire brush. For dual piston calipers a small stainless wire brush works OK but a PITA unless you want to split the calipers so you can use the Dremel tool. You could paint the groves with high temp paint used on calipers, I never tried that though.

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    Just use a brass brush as per above to avoid damage to adjacent surfaces, like the seal. Put a light coat of silicone brake caliper grease on the cleaned surfaces to prevent rust.

    Like Alex said, I wouldn't worry about it. It's a brake caliper- in 10,000 km it will be disgusting again.

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    Have a look at this thread.

    Caliper cleaning example.

    Evaporust making my own report so far.

    I like to use acid wash primer to coat my undercarriage parts for preservation.

    SAF Ω

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    Mask (or turn a rubber plug) and glass bead blast.

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    Quote Originally Posted by RC Mech View Post
    Just use a brass brush as per above to avoid damage to adjacent surfaces, like the seal. Put a light coat of silicone brake caliper grease on the cleaned surfaces to prevent rust.

    Like Alex said, I wouldn't worry about it. It's a brake caliper- in 10,000 km it will be disgusting again.
    What he said. Unless you want to coat it as a "show" caliper behind wheels with large openings I wouldn't waste the time to do more than make sure it is in peak mechanical condition.

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    Thanks for the replies.

    The rust in the outer seal cavity is quite jagged, and I don't want to damage the outer seal on reassembly. I have a full seal kit and will be replacing all of the seals.

    Unfortunately I don't have access to any bead blasting equipment.

    I am reluctant to submerge it in any kind of chemical bath as these calipers have a built-in handbrake mechanism and contain a roller brearing. Apparently these bearings are not available as a spare part, and there doesn't appear to be any way to remove them without damaging them.

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    If I wanted to remove the described rust, I would disassemble to the maximum degree practicable and soak them in Evaporust. It won't damage your bearings (assuming they're made of steel).

    If it's a British designed component proceed at your own risk. Out of curiosity, please translate "roller bearing" into American English or provide a picture of the type.

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    "If it's a British designed component proceed at your own risk. Out of curiosity, please translate "roller bearing" into American English or provide a picture of the type."

    http://d315rp2pq5jxiy.cloudfront.net....NE.186069.jpg

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    In the states a exchange for rebuild is so inexpensive that I no longer mess with them- just exchange and get on down the road..

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    On my calipers for a 60's Fiat I just made up a steel scraper and carefully cleaned them out, they were 3 piston units that I had split the calipers. Replacements were available but cost more than the car is worth. I wasn't going for show but just for function, they got new seals, dust boots, and pistons. Put in in a vise with some good light and have at it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by extropic View Post
    If I wanted to remove the described rust, I would disassemble to the maximum degree practicable and soak them in Evaporust. It won't damage your bearings (assuming they're made of steel).

    If it's a British designed component proceed at your own risk. Out of curiosity, please translate "roller bearing" into American English or provide a picture of the type.
    It is actually a Japanese caliper. It is from an imported Japanese spec 4x4 vehicle that was never sold in the UK with these particular calipers. They are not available as exchange units.

    For roller bearing I mean this type of bearing. The bearing fitted to the caliper is an open-cage type as shown in the picture. The size fitted to the calipers is apparently not available to buy.


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    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    Mask (or turn a rubber plug) and glass bead blast.
    We used to use walnut shell in the blaster for that and similar applications.

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    Living in the almond capital of the world I wonder if they ever use almond shells for blasting? I would guess they are softer then walnut shells.
    Bill D.
    modesto, ca, USA

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    smell better too?

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    I believe bead blasting is the best way to go. If you can't do that I've used a stainless steel tooth type brush followed by 150 or so grit emery folded to fit groove. Before reassembly coat all surfaces with Dow 111 silicone grease. Grease is heavy (thick ) and stays put pretty good. I also use it on the mounting surfaces of brake rotors and calipers. Makes the next brake job faster as there is much less rust to remove. My wife drove a rural mail route and I would do brakes every 8 weeks... I needed to make it a little less labor intensive.

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    For $50ish a caliper let the reman people deal with it. Comes with new seals and a warranty.


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