Saw Blade for Grade 2 Titanium
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  1. #1
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    Default Saw Blade for Grade 2 Titanium

    I need to cut 1" wide, 0.125" thick strips of Grade 2 Titanium to length (1.25"). I've got a DeWalt DW872 that runs a 14" blade at 1300rpm. I have a stainless-specific blade I was going to try for this but I'm not sure if there is a better product out there I should buy instead? I don't want to spend more than $80-100 on this blade since I don't make much money on these parts (I will sell them but most will go into product boxes as SWAG, think LaRue 'dillos). If double that price with triple the number of cuts, though... I'm a believer in "buy once, cry once."

    Also, who is a good supplier for this type of material? My local suppliers (Alro and Speedy Metals) don't seem to stock any Titanium. Cut to length would be even better!

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    McMaster Carr has the size you need. I would saw them using a band saw at slow speed with coolant.
    If you're only doing a few, you could get by with a hack saw. Whatever you choose, use a bimetal blade.

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    Let us know how it goes..I was thinking about setting up a saw..but not for titanium..
    Machining Titanium: Tips and Tools for Milling Titanium | Better MRO
    Machining Titanium on JobShop.com

    I see some advertise
    Long life blade averages 800 cuts of 2" x 2" and wall thickness 1/8" mild steel at about 1300rpm.
    cold saws run much slower perhaps 25 to 150rpm.

    I wonder what mileage one might get out of a cold saw for titanium or mild steel?
    Circular Cold Saw | Scotchman Cold Saw

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    While you're at it, read this thread
    Is Titanium prone to catch fire???
    Just stuff you should know. Piece of cake compared to a uranium fire.
    JR

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    We've had metals fires at my "day job" from grinding and laser dusts from several different metals. Not fun!

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    You will have a hell of a time with a chop saw. Most likely destroy the saw blade and the material. Bandsaw would be ideal. Coolant helps, but I cut it dry all the time. I would stack them to get a little more meat to cut.

    If you're itchin to buy a tool, prob better off buying a little Femi band saw for stuff like that, since you'd get more mileage out of the blade and have the saw for other uses.

    Call George, he might even be able to shear it for you.
    AMERICAN METAL XCHANGE, INC.

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    Thanks for the referral, kazlx! I think I'm going to hack saw these first few and then move to paying for getting it cut.

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    The other option would be to mount strips in the cnc and machine slots in the material with like an 1/8" end mill and then just cut or break the tabs.

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    Yeah I figured by the time I'm doing that I can just cut them out of a larger sheet instead of one at a time. I was hoping to be able to do an OP1/OP2 flip in a single vise setup but I think ultimately I should be running these in larger lots lights-out while I'm in the house drinking whiskey. My "no drinking before or while working with power tools" rule is seriously cutting into my whiskey time these days.

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    I'm looking into getting blanks water jet cut. Looks like it would cost me around $10/ea. With my current failure rate on the super glue fixturing I'd be saving money for sure...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Finsta View Post
    I'm looking into getting blanks water jet cut. Looks like it would cost me around $10/ea. With my current failure rate on the super glue fixturing I'd be saving money for sure...
    For that cost difference, you'd prob be better off just getting thicker material and holding them in talons. Then machine the carrier off on the second op.


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