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Thread: Sharpening countersinks

  1. #21
    dgfoster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EPAIII View Post
    It is not a tilted cone, it is a combination of a cone and a helix/spiral. As you rotate past the cutting edge, the angle of the cone, as measured to the axis, constantly decreases. This creates the clearance. So you can not generate this shape by tilting any cone with a constant angle. The action used to create this is much the same as that used to create "conical" tips on drill bits. The angle must change while the tool is rotated across it's face.
    This could be checked by chucking a single tooth CS in yor lathe and placing an edge of a cutter in the compound parallel to the cutting edge of the CS. Then rotate the chucked CS say 180 degrees and crank the cutter in until it is against the side of the cone. Does the angle change or does the cutter remain in full contact with the side of the cone? If cutter is swung and spiraled in the angle will change. If it advances spirally as driven by a fixed lead screw it will remain parallel.

    Denis

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    rpchristian is offline Aluminum
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    Quote Originally Posted by EPAIII View Post
    We never did get an answer to the type of countersink question. Different types need different techniques. !
    I was trying to grind 3-fluted csinks.

  3. #23
    Nick Mueller is offline Titanium
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    I was trying to grind 3-fluted csinks.
    That should work. It doesn't matter how you tried it with what work head. But really, it should work.

    Was the drill running in reverse?


    Nick

  4. #24
    sticks is offline Aluminum
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    '3-flutes' usually offer plenty of room to get a wheel into the flute. Helps if you have a cg, tho'. I'd face the flutes as long as you can maintain a reasonable primary land width at the cutting diameter. After that, top-grind but keep relief angle low and let 'em feed slow into the cut with that in mind.

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    stephen thomas is offline Diamond
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    It does sound like some mentioned earlier, the flute was not timed correctly with the cam.
    Poly choke as well as R & A machine indexer shown previously will do that work fine on multi-flute tools....Just so long as first flute is placed correctly.

    smt

  6. #26
    TDegenhart is online now Stainless
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    You need a machine like a RO grinder, aka Royal Oaks, now owned by Seneca Falls Technology. These are cam operated grinders, been around since the 50's or 60's

    Royal OakŪ Grinders

    I have one of the machines that I am rebuilding. They have a very detailed manual that is used with their machines but I would assume would also work with other cam operated grinders as to how to set up for various tools.

    Tom

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    Quote Originally Posted by dgfoster View Post
    I did exactly that. I used a 20 TPI screw to get the desired relief. Worked out well. Quite a bit of work, but an interestinbg design project. You do not need the boss with the ten holes on the top of the spindle housing for this application so I sawed it off and cleaned it up with a file. Sometimes that boss gets in the way otherwise. Various "lead screws" can be used for varying relief. Has other applications as well if no lead screw is used and is a simple spinner.

    I will likely power mine similar to the compound powerfeed for spinning various cylindrical items not using the lead screw.

    Denis
    I was on vacation for 3 weeks and just got back. I wanted to post pics while I was gone but did not have them with me.
    Here are some pictures of a solution using a simple spindex modified to sharpen single-flute countersinks. It will have additional
    add-ons and applications as time goes along. I believe the patent posted previously by Heavy Metal in this thread may be a simpler and better solution for the sole purpose of single-flute countersink sharpening.

    "Heavey Metal
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails single-flute1.jpg   single-flute4.jpg   single-flute5.jpg   single-flute3.jpg  

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