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  1. #1
    torfinn9990 is offline Plastic
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    Default sleeving brake cylinder

    I am restoring a willys jeep, and the master cylinder is pitted. I think I should bore it out and press a brass sleeve in. The master cylinder has a 1" bore and is 4" long. Has anyone done this before? I know this can be done by professional shops. I think i should remove 1/16 from the cylinder and press in a sleeve. Then ream the sleeve to original size. How tight should the sleeve be? I think it is enough with a light press fit?

    I have a 9" SB C.
    regards
    Torfinn

  2. #2
    chuckster is offline Aluminum
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    Old corvettes have a lot of problems with the caliper bores so they sleeve them with stainless steel. I think this would be a better material to use. Chuck

  3. #3
    SAG 180's Avatar
    SAG 180 is offline Titanium
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    Quote Originally Posted by chuckster View Post
    Old corvettes have a lot of problems with the caliper bores so they sleeve them with stainless steel. I think this would be a better material to use. Chuck
    I second the stainless steel, isn't there a ready made thinwall stainless sleeve available for exactly this purpose.

  4. #4
    torfinn9990 is offline Plastic
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    Many of the professional businesses that does this service use brass. One company actually advice against stainless steel:
    http://www.brakecylinder.com/sleeve2.htm#stainless

    Torfinn

  5. #5
    Powerpooche's Avatar
    Powerpooche is offline Cast Iron
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    FYI -NEW master cylinder cost about $45.00 and repair kits are about $15.00.
    Check out Rigid Steel .com

    Just put a kit in my '46 CJ2A.

    P.O.

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  6. #6
    SAG 180's Avatar
    SAG 180 is offline Titanium
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    Quote Originally Posted by torfinn9990 View Post
    Many of the professional businesses that does this service use brass. One company actually advice against stainless steel:
    http://www.brakecylinder.com/sleeve2.htm#stainless

    Torfinn
    I guess it comes down to how rare and delicate do you consider a Willys cylinder, I'm curious as to their "Different assembly techniques" with brass. They might be able to machine a neat fit and use Loctite sleeve retainer if the temps doesn't go over 400 deg F. According to Wikipedia DOT3 spec fluid boils between 401 deg F dry to 284 deg F wet so Loctite 640 sleeve retainer would be on it's upper working limit, worst case scenario.

    Doesn't brass allow tighter fits than stainless before binding, e.g. a brass shaft can be a tighter fit into a ball bearing inner race with out risking it binding?.

    The cylinders I saw sleeved in stainless here in Australia were commonly available reconditioned units, I have no idea what the stainless alloy was or how tight it was fitted.

  7. #7
    Peter. is offline Hot Rolled
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    A master cylinder would never see those sort of temperatures, like a slave cylinder might.

  8. #8
    jim rozen is online now Diamond
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    The best approach to repairing this problem is to simply replace the master
    cylinder assembly with a new old stock unit. In the US these are inexpensively
    available from a variety of sources. When I helped work on my neighbors
    GPW jeep (same car) he was able to get fuel pumps, brake cylinders,
    master cylinders, transmission parts, all new old stock. So one thing you might
    do is search around and try to get plugged into a network of folks who work
    on military vehicles like that and they might be able to steer you to a source.

    Or, do a bit of legwork and find a supplier on your own.

    It's nice to have new stuff on the vehicle as it makes it a much more reliable
    driver in the long haul.

    Now.

    If you cannot find a replacement unit, then inspect the rebuild parts you will
    be putting into it if you do rebuild it. The bore is probably a round number in
    sixteenths of an inch and if so then you can purchase brass telescoping
    tubing from a company called Small Parts in the US. This is how I did it when
    I had to sleeve a cast iron master for a motorbike which was tough to get.

    The bore of the tubing will be near net size for your piston and cups if you
    are lucky.

    So the drill is, bore out the ID of the cylinder, ream to size with a one over
    reamer that allows a thou or so on the radius clearance for the tubing you
    decide. Cut the tubing to length, deburr the ends. Degrease it all very
    well and coat the exterior of the brass with locktite 600 series bearing
    retention compund. In my case I cut some *very* shallow grooves on the
    OD of the tubing (two or three thou only) to aid in retention.

    Then drop it in, let it set up.

    Drill the ports (can be tricky, some of them are very small and at an angle) and
    then deburr the holes into the bore that you have made. Otherwise the
    rubber seals will get torn up.

    Jim

  9. #9
    torfinn9990 is offline Plastic
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    Thank you Jim. This is exactly the info I want. I know there are NOS parts out there, and I know of most major suppliers of willys mb parts. Actually I have a gpw frame, with a willys body on. The easiest thing would be to get a replacement. Some of the nos master cylinders are post war and they are a little different. I like many others, like a challenge so I think I will try to sleeve it myself, to have the satisfaction of doing the rebuild myself.

    best regards
    Torfinn Sornes

  10. #10
    SVE Performance's Avatar
    SVE Performance is online now Cast Iron
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    When you are done sleeving the master cyl fill the brake system with Dot 5 Brake fluid those master cylinders are open to the atmosphere . Unless you would like to change the Dot 3 every 6 months like the service manual recomends for those brake systems .Bill

  11. #11
    David Utidjian's Avatar
    David Utidjian is offline Titanium
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    Back when I did classic car restorations I had cylinders relined from two different services. They were done in both brass and stainless. Both were of excellent quality in that they were finished to almost mirror like satin finish. The only service I remember the name of is Whitepost Restorations. They use the brass liner and will restore just about any cylinder, booster, caliper, or what-have-you to original or better specs AND a lifetime warranty. They charge accordingly.

    -DU-
    Last edited by David Utidjian; 03-28-2009 at 02:43 PM. Reason: fiks speling

  12. #12
    jim rozen is online now Diamond
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    OK, then try to get the "telescoping brass tubing" that I mentioned, it is tyipically
    sold with 1/64 inch walls, so the bores come in 1/32 inch increments. Be sure to make
    the thing a driver, not a hanger queen!!





    Jim

  13. #13
    BobsSouthbend is offline Plastic
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    I have done this on a nisan but used stainless and shrunk fit after freezing it worked fine

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