Small Shop Bandsaw Recommendation - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    How about putting the one you have on wheels? I know that does not make it any smaller but maybe would allow you to get it out of the way. I have a wellsaw that is about the same size and vintage as your saw and did this. I keep it close to the wall most of the time and just swing it out as needed for long stuff. Made from 3x3x1/2 angle and some stout polyurethane casters off ebay. I think I have less than $200 + time in it. I will post a picture later.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Johnny SolidWorks View Post

    I literally cannot get it any further out of the way than what it is (I have to open the overhead door for anything longer than a couple of feet) and I still step around it constantly.
    There is your solution, open the overhead and push it outside. Make a little lean-to over it
    or something. I've got one outside that isn't even covered. Granted, I don't like it very much,
    it didn't cost very much, it doesn't rain very much, and we might get snow once every few years,
    and I don't use it much, but it lives nicely outside.


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  4. #23
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    #2 for a power hacksaw if its not going to be too slow as, given appropriate low cunning to arrange material runs, they can be slid into small spaces.

    Mine sits at the end of my larger lathe aligned so the stock to be cut runs just in front of the lathe chip tray. Largest size comes just above tray edge height. If needs must I can drive the lathe whilst the saw is nibbling off another bit from the bar stock. Obviously things are properly supported so things don't drop on my foot! It's a 6" Rapidor so a bit smaller than what you'd need. Adds about a foot to the effective length of the lathe and stick out is very little more than standing space needed to operate the machine comfortably. Perhaps 16 or 17 inches beyond the chip tray. Do need to bolt the things down tho' or they will walk. Hafta remember about the cutting frame extension when its working tho'.

    Clive

  5. #24
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    I've got one of those Johnson bandsaws. Looks exactly like yours. I put 4 casters under it. It's still in the way but I get to decide where it is less in the way, depending on what I'm doing. I also have a roll in. Small footprint and very versatile. I actually have it at home, between the two overhead garage doors.

  6. #25
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    Given the OP's usage requirements, I'd have to agree with Projectnut's suggestion of a power hacksaw.

    I bought a large surface grinder out of the maintenance shop of a medical equipment manufacturer and they gave me a fully functional Keller power hack they no longer used.

    It takes up about the same amount of space as one of the 4x6 Chinese toys, but it will make dead straight cuts on large stock that puts both my manual Wellsaw and roller feed auto Kalamazoo to shame. Like Projectnut says, blades are widely available at dirt cheap prices. Mine uses 1-1/2" blades at about twice the thickness of equivalent bandsaw blades, and its the beam stiffness of that big blade that gives the cut quality.

    I use mine anytime I'm cutting anything larger than 6" round and also use it if I need to cut thin wafers from anything larger than about 3" round.

    I ran across an article in a trade magazine probably 20 years ago that made the argument that, assuming a particular horizontal bandsaw is structurally stiff enough to be up to the task, its the blade size and not the vise capacity that determines the size of solid stock a saw is suitable for cutting.

    They said a saw with a 1" blade is good up to 4" round, and marginal up to 6". But its totally unsuitable for anything larger than 6" other than perhaps an occasional cut. Both my Wellsaw and Kalamazoo saws run 1" blades and I've found the info from that article to be dead on the money. Prior to having the hacksaw, I had a few occasions to cut some 8" round which is near the upper limit of what the frame of either saw will clear. Had to baby the saw all the way thru the cut every time, as you just can't get enough feed force on the blade to get it to bite the stock without taking a chance on the blade deflecting and walking around thru the cut.

    I've also got a DoAll 1216 automatic that runs a 1-1/4" blade. Finally put it in a storage trailer due to lack of use, but it would plow thru 8" round as easily as the 1" saws will cut 4" round. That said, it has a physical max capacity of 18" round, and I'd guess it would struggle with that size the same way a 1" saw struggles with 8" stock.

    All said and done, for occasional use, max versatility from small to large, cheap operation, and occupying minimal space, a good power hacksaw would be hard to beat. That they're available in good condition at dirt cheap prices is one more point in their favor.

  7. #26
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    Adding my vote for the Roll-in. With a few simple mods (back fence and Heinrich clamp) it is one of the most versatile saws with a relatively small footprint.

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  9. #27
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    If you never cut anything larger than 4" diameter or 4" x 4" you might consider a portable model like a Portaband with a homemade stand. There used to be a factory stand as an accessory. It may still be available. Milwaukee also makes a similar model that will cut 5" x 5" and an optional stand is available. These wouldn't take much space to store.

    Deep Cut Variable Speed Band Saw Kit | Milwaukee Tool

    Portable Bandsaw Table | Milwaukee Tool

  10. #28
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    My #1 suggestion is the Wellsaw 58B. #2 is a gearhead 7x12 saw, not the Jet, though. They used to run about $1100 from Enco but now that they're gone I don't know where you can get a good price.

    metalmagpie

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    If a cold saw will cover most of your work, go that way. Then look at the jobs the cold saw won't cut, and see if a portaband will help out. The portaband fits nicely on a shelf when not in use and doesn't cost much, so it doesn't have to do much to earn its keep.

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  13. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scottl View Post
    If you never cut anything larger than 4" diameter or 4" x 4" you might consider a portable model like a Portaband with a homemade stand. There used to be a factory stand as an accessory. It may still be available. Milwaukee also makes a similar model that will cut 5" x 5" and an optional stand is available. These wouldn't take much space to store.

    Deep Cut Variable Speed Band Saw Kit | Milwaukee Tool

    Portable Bandsaw Table | Milwaukee Tool
    I use the Portaband and an old version of the table made from steel (vs the new cast aluminum version). It's nice for bars up to about 2", but too slow above that size. Bars over 2" go to the power hacksaw.

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  15. #31
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    Funny all the people who love their old Kysor-Johnson saws, just goes to show you beauty is only skin deep, as most of them are now quite the eyesore. The model in the picture is at least a little over 30 years old and could be almost 50. Definitely a well made piece of equipment.

  16. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scottl View Post
    If you never cut anything larger than 4" diameter or 4" x 4" you might consider a portable model like a Portaband with a homemade stand. There used to be a factory stand as an accessory. It may still be available. Milwaukee also makes a similar model that will cut 5" x 5" and an optional stand is available. These wouldn't take much space to store.

    Deep Cut Variable Speed Band Saw Kit | Milwaukee Tool

    Portable Bandsaw Table | Milwaukee Tool
    Swag Offroad makes a nice table for the Portaband saw.

    http://www.swagoffroad.com/SWAG-V40-...able_p_63.html

    portaband.jpg

  17. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dualkit View Post
    ...Definitely a well made piece of equipment.
    And still in production, essentially unchanged. That says a lot about the design. It's one of those machines that can be ridden hard and put away wet.

    The OP can even order new casters from Dake if he decides to keep it.

    Slop a coat of paint on it and it's even halfway presentable.

    kj-j.jpg


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