Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 34
Like Tree6Likes

Thread: Squaring up a block of material

  1. #1
    Metalismo is offline Plastic
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    40

    Post

    Can someone help me here? I was taught when squaring up a block of material to first fly cut the face with the largest area with the block seated on two parallels. Then turn that surface so it is against the solid jaw of the vice and using one parallel in the back and a drill/reamer blank between the moving jaw and the block, seat with a dead blow mallet and cut the second side. Now this is where my assistant and I do it different. He says to rotate the block so the first side is facing down and the second side is against the solid jaw. I flip the block so the second side is facing down and the first side remains against the solid jaw. Again using the drill/reamer blank between the block and moving jaw the third side is cut. He rotates again for the fourth side with the second side facing down and the third side against the solid jaw. I place the block second side down and first side against the solid jaw to cut the fourth side. What is the proper way?

  2. #2
    johnoder's Avatar
    johnoder is online now Diamond
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Houston, TX USA
    Posts
    21,636

    Post

    The way that makes the squarest block with your equipment

  3. #3
    gill_bates is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Ireland
    Posts
    11

    Post

    ".....using one parallel in the back and a drill/reamer blank between the moving jaw and the block, seat with a dead blow mallet and cut the second side." - Parallel might influence squareness, so dont hit with mallett.

    Your assistants method gives too much room for error - also you need to ensure a fairly decent sawn part. I reckon!!!!

  4. #4
    Limy Sami is online now Diamond
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Norfolk, UK
    Posts
    11,720

    Post

    I was taught, best face to the fixed jaw, m/c second best, flip to second best face against the jaw best face on parallels etc and so on.

    If the first face is much higher than the jaw, use an angle plate,.......... sometimes finding the best starting face is a bit of a gamble.

    Take care, Sami.

  5. #5
    Jim W is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Tallahassee, Florida
    Posts
    18

    Post

    Metalismo,

    I was taught that you put the flattest surface of the block against the stationary jaw, with a piece of round stock between the moveable jaw and the block. Take a cleanup cut and then rotate the freshly cut side to the stationary jaw, put the round stock back between the moveable jaw and clean up the next face. Repeat this until all four sides have been cleaned up. For the ends you can use a square to set up so the top is square to your sides. Then flip upside down and cut the bottom.

    Jim

  6. #6
    Tom Lg's Avatar
    Tom Lg is offline Cast Iron
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Costa Mesa CA USA
    Posts
    300

    Post

    I'm with Jim W., that's how I learned to do it, and that's how I do it now. But I also agree with "johnoder".

  7. #7
    anteekfreek is offline Cast Iron
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    South Central Indiana
    Posts
    348

    Post

    It's always depended on the circumstances for me, although the basics are almost always the same.

    Try squaring up a 3 ton block of tool steel that cost half a gazillion dollars and took 3 months to get.

  8. #8
    Boris is offline Titanium
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    England
    Posts
    3,017

    Post

    Try squaring up a nice block of steel (about 5" by 7" by 36")thats been cut from round bar (because thats all the stuff comes in).
    The roughers machined the blanks + .008" on all sides and .006" out of square

    Then you get the warning for taking so long to finish a simple blank off when the squareness limit is .0015"

    Glad I left that place

    Boris

  9. #9
    Metalcutter's Avatar
    Metalcutter is offline Titanium
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    San Diego
    Posts
    2,862

    Post

    I remembered the alternate way to square the ends after the "faces" were done.

    I actually did this on a short run of brass parts. About 3"x4"x1.5"

    Turn up one "rough" end and hold the narrow sides in the vise jaws. Fly cut the top easy until it cleans up. You may want to lean it just a bit so you know which edge is the highest.

    Then rotate it 90 degrees and use that highest edge to set on the vise bottom clamping on the widest sides. The highest became perpendicular to the narrow sides when you machined it.

    So when flycutting the last end it will become perpendicular in both directions.

    Lastly reverse the ends again and recut. It then it too will also become square.

    Of course this presupposes the vise jaw is perpendicular before you start.

    Regards,

    Stan-

    [ 10-18-2007, 02:00 PM: Message edited by: Metalcutter ]
    Mike C., JoeBean and Edster like this.

  10. #10
    Metalismo is offline Plastic
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    40

    Post

    Thanks for that tip metalcutter! Makes total sense!

  11. #11
    bronto48 is offline Hot Rolled
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Laytonsville, Maryland
    Posts
    532

    Post

    Great tip, Metalcutter. So simple and no square needed. Think I will go make a cube just for fun.

  12. #12
    Joe D Grinder is offline Titanium
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    S.W. New Mexico
    Posts
    2,391

    Post

    Stan, that's cute as hell! Thanks...Joe

  13. #13
    Forrest Addy is online now Diamond
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    Bremerton WA USA
    Posts
    9,314

    Post

    "First do this ... then do that" cookbook recipes for basic operations may be common sense approaches but they leave out important preliminary steps like determining initial error.

    First check your vise for base parallelism and fixed jaw squareness under clamping load, and your spindle axis for squareness parallelism. If you don't know what your equipment is doing before you start, attempts for precision will be guesswork.

    There are many ways of squaring a block on a mill. Most will work but only a few are efficacious. Most people have a rough idea of how their equipment performs under various circumstances. I favor seeking out error sources so I can neutralise their effects before they bite me in the butt.

    If you wish to go directly from rough to square and parallel in a minimum number of steps first check the machinery and the set-up - if you have not already done so.

  14. #14
    willbird is offline Banned
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    North(very) West(very) Ohio...near exit 13 on OH turnpike
    Posts
    3,714

    Post

    Then some of your steel blocks walk all over the place with every cut ...only saw that once or twice but then the first step is to get the hide off the thing all the way around first, leaving some stock to actually allow finishing square and parallel


    Bill

  15. #15
    Metalcutter's Avatar
    Metalcutter is offline Titanium
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    San Diego
    Posts
    2,862

    Post

    Thank you all for your warm responses. *Smile

    Regards,

    Stan-

  16. #16
    Metalcutter's Avatar
    Metalcutter is offline Titanium
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    San Diego
    Posts
    2,862

    Post

    I just realized! I made it to "Brass."

    That means I'm in the Metal membership. :- )

    Regards,

    Stan-

  17. #17
    MetalMelter's Avatar
    MetalMelter is offline Cast Iron
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Pocono's, Pennsylvania
    Posts
    279

    Post

    Boy I hate to do this but what would this forum be without the ability to ask a question...

    Why can't I visualize those steps?? Been starring at the movements too long now so now I need to ask for a someone (metalcutter pls lol) to explain that maneuver a tad better.

    I loose it here: "You may want to lean it"

    Now I keep on reading, and bam "Then rotate it 90 degrees"... the part or the vise - hope it's not the vise...

    So now I'm thinking the fresh cut side is face down, canted from the "lean" cut and then clamped
    lengthwise in the vise?? I better stop here because I think I'm looking to far into something obviously simple.

    Maybe if this thread started 6 hours ago and the coffee was fresh and ... well you get the picture. help me out here guys

  18. #18
    Dead Nuts is offline Cast Iron
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    So. California
    Posts
    293

    Post

    "lean it" =slang for trim the fat. LOL.

    Don't give up, took me a couple reads too.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    1,211

    Post

    I try to grab as little stock as possible. I face mill the top and side mill the 4 sides as deep as possible with a rougher and finisher.

    Then when I flip I can grab the part perfectly and face the top and side mill the sides. You have to be careful when side milling that it blends with the flipped side. If done right you can't tell.

  20. #20
    Metalcutter's Avatar
    Metalcutter is offline Titanium
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    San Diego
    Posts
    2,862

    Post

    I actually did this on a short run of brass parts. About 3"x4"x1.5"

    Turn up one "rough" end and hold the part by the narrow sides in the vise jaws. Fly cut the top easy until it cleans up. You may want to lean it over to the right or left a degree or so you know which edge is the highest * after the cut.

    Then rotate * the part 90 degrees looking from the top down. Then turn the part upside down.

    Now use that highest edge to rest on the vise floor next to the fixed jaw. You will be clamping on the widest sides. The highest edge became perpendicular to the narrow sides when you machined it.

    So when fly cutting the last end it will become perpendicular in both directions.

    Lastly reverse the ends again and recut. It then it too will also become square.

    Of course this presupposes the vise jaw is perpendicular before you start and the vise floor is flat to the table travel.

    I hope this helps. It can take a bit to understand what's going on here.

    Maybe take an actual part and roll it around and try to visualize it all. Sometimes words are not enough. :- )

    Regards,

    Stan-

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •