Results 1 to 14 of 14
  1. #1
    Aaron Wilson is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    6

    Post

    Hi All,
    How is the nice swirl mark finish made on a flat surface?

    Thanks
    Aaron

  2. #2
    L Vanice is online now Diamond
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Fort Wayne, IN
    Posts
    8,703

    Post

    There are many styles of "nice swirl mark finish." Can you be more specific?

    Larry

  3. #3
    Aaron Wilson is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    6

    Post

    Yes Larry,
    The finish I am trying to describe is concentric circles. I tried to use a wine cork in my mill collet with lapping compound. put downward pressure then move the table 1x dia of cork then pressure again, repeat. Wish I had a picture to show you. I have seen this finish on a bank vault door ( much larger scale than I am trying)

    [img]smile.gif[/img]

  4. #4
    SND
    SND is offline Diamond
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    9,165

    Post

    I'm guessing that this is close to the finish you're thinking of. Only time I did this was on the scale cover for my mill/drill. I don't have a better picture. http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y18...g/DSCF0010.jpg

    In my case I just used a 1" dia piece of plastic and used double sided tape to hold a piece of emery cloth. I did have to change the emery cloth a few times. I spaced them out equal using the mill of course but some do it by hand.

    On large areas some use a round sanding disk on a hand drill. I think there's a few ways to space them out to get different effects. I wasn't so sure when I tried it out, I mostly did it just to hide future scratches.

  5. #5
    johnoder's Avatar
    johnoder is online now Diamond
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Houston, TX USA
    Posts
    20,982

    Post

    The term is Engine Turning

    John

  6. #6
    Aaron Wilson is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    6

    Post

    Thanks to SND and John for the proper term
    I will try the emery cloth

    A

  7. #7
    jim rozen is offline Diamond
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    peekskill, NY
    Posts
    21,272

    Post

    Sorta like this eh:



    Looks sorta pretty on an airplane cowl but I much
    prefer the appearence of a real hand-scraped
    surface on machine tools.

    Jim

  8. #8
    L Vanice is online now Diamond
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Fort Wayne, IN
    Posts
    8,703

    Post

    That finish can be done with a drill press or vertical mill. You can use a wood dowel with a small abrasive disc on the end. You can also use a brass or cast iron rod and various grades of lapping compound. It depends on the material you are finishing. The key is to overlap the circular patterns with uniform spacing. A very slight tilt may help, too. I built a jig once that used a coarse pitch power hacksaw blade to quickly index the part in one axis.

    I once used a Bosch random-orbit disc sander on a piece of steel plate, the apron on a Di-Acro shear. It took off the light rust and left a very nice random swirl pattern.

    The ultimate swirl finish is found on high grade antique pocket watch movements. The rotating lap was moved by an ornamental lathe or straight line engine in complex patterns. Sometimes the finish was made two-tone by gold plating and lapping through parts of the plating to the underlying silver color metal.

    Google "engine turning" to find a wide range of definitions and descriptions. Some will answer your specific question, and others will lead you to rose engines and straight line machines.

    Larry

  9. #9
    Aaron Wilson is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    6

    Post

    Thanks Larry,
    I will try your sugestions, lots of information on the web now that I know the correct term


    Thanks to all

    Aaron

  10. #10
    Cuda is offline Cast Iron
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    492

    Post

    That is also done on gunparts and sometimes known as "Jeweling" Brownells sells a kit for doing very small parts... Engine turning kit

  11. #11
    jabezkin is offline Stainless
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    littlestown,pa
    Posts
    1,732

    Post

    cratex also works well, as will a small wire brush

  12. #12
    Tyrone Shoelaces is online now Titanium
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Manchester, England
    Posts
    3,242

    Post

    I use a piece of 3/4" Tufnol( but you could use bigger) with a slot sawn in the bottom on the centre line, fold a small piece of emery cloth in two and slide it into the slot, folding the cloth that sticks out back down onto the Tufnol creates a little disc of emery. Quick dabs with a pedestal drill work best, don't allow the material to dwell on the work.Regards Tyrone.

  13. #13
    Carl Darnell is offline Titanium
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Taylorsville Ky
    Posts
    3,122

    Post

    You can buy rubber abrasive rounds (they look like pencil erasers) to mount in a holder in different diameters and grit. Do a search. The rubber abrasive does a better job and is more controlable.

  14. #14
    Forrest Addy is online now Diamond
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    Bremerton WA USA
    Posts
    9,178

    Post

    Pencil erasers work on soft materials and look good on a small scale.

    Cratex stick works on a larger scale and you can chuck in directly. Dress the end with coarse sandpaper for consistancy.

    Or you could roll up a piece of sand paper and chuckk it.

    Or you can get a Ro-Lok kit and use the non-woven fabric abrasive disks.

    On a larger scale there an angle grinder and a soft pad sanding disk.

    Stick and valve grinding compound has already been mentioned.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •