Unusual terms for materials,tooling etc - Page 3
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  1. #41
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    "Double griffon steel", a hexagonal shock resisting steel used for crowbars, pneumatic drill bits and the like.

    Apparently it was a trademark and some steel was rolled with a griffon or two...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Greenwud View Post
    "Double griffon steel", a hexagonal shock resisting steel used for crowbars, pneumatic drill bits and the like.

    Apparently it was a trademark and some steel was rolled with a griffon or two...
    Greenwud,

    Supplied by Eagle & Globe Steel (Edgar Allen, Balfour Group) who also offered the once commonly seen HSS "Capital", "Super Capital", "Ultra Capital"....and "Ultra Capital Plus One" this last seems a bit unimaginative!

    I just had a look in my E&G catalogue and see they offered a carbon steel named "Crowbar" in octagonal sizes, probably cheaper than "Double Griffin" which was a nickel-chrome tool steel. "Its qualities are maximum toughness combine with hardness".

    I have a E&G (NZ) 1985 stocklist and they stocked both "Crowbar" octagon and 'Double Griffin" octagon, hexagon and oval in a range of sizes.

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  5. #43
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    Very interesting everybody. At the old ed institution where I worked,the works manager,old Gilly,kept the VG tool steel in his desk-it was always an achievement to cadge a piece from him!

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    I've heard the term VG, however it referred to the chain of village supermarket shops in the 70s, happy shopper of the day, cheap and sometimes cheerful.
    Mark

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    Quote Originally Posted by RC Mech View Post
    That's just because most of the elektrosity in this province and Quebec's comes from hydro-electric dams. It doesn't help that every municipality up here calls themselves "______ Hydro".
    Oh, I know why, but it's still stupid and misleading.

    I did a foundation for a machine tool made in canuck land.

    It needed stub outs for both electricity, supply water, and drain
    (cooling water).

    The electricty was on the other side of the machine away from the water source/drain.

    They labelled the electricity supply line as "Hydro".....

    Imagine this drawing being sent to a foreign country where a translator
    would be involved.

    This slackjaw, lazy, slang lingo crap is just WRONG, we live in a technical world, GET IT RIGHT.
    Last edited by digger doug; 01-11-2018 at 12:10 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steven-Canada View Post
    "Silver Steel" as a reference to W1 or some other tool steel.
    Common reference around here, comes from Germany I believe. Silberstahl.
    Have heard that silver was originally used as an alloying in high quality blade/tool steel but I wasn't able to find any online references for this.

    Arne is also familiar grade of steel, have various sizes in my own h*o*m*e shop.

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    unobtanium = material selected by the engineer without checking availability

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    Quote Originally Posted by boslab View Post
    I've heard the term VG, however it referred to the chain of village supermarket shops in the 70s, happy shopper of the day, cheap and sometimes cheerful.
    Mark
    Mark,I remember the VG stores too. This VG was made by Osborn-Mushet,matt black and very good for stainless. I've still got some as a memento of my years there.

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    I worked for a brass extrusion company where we made GCQ which was 'good commercial quality' it was used for items like brass curtain track and was a way to use up off spec extrusion billets.

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    Lucas made a lot of electrical stuff for older British cars. It was refered to by Lucas, the prince of darkness. My brother had his Lucas generator burn up and drain the battery while the car was parked. It might have been the Lucas voltage regulator as the root cause.
    Bill D.

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    I've been told Lucas refrigerators are the reason the British like warm beer.

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    Leprechaun snot

    cunt hair

    red cunt hair

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    Quote Originally Posted by jrmach View Post

    red cunt hair
    Referred to as an RCH in mixed company.

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    As a young lab rat I remember gong to the big shop to ask the man on duty (a weekly rotating job of dealing with lab rats) for some tin foil. "No we don't have tin foil." <awkward silence> "You didn't mean aluminum foil did you? Because why would you have asked for tin foil if you wanted aluminum foil?" This was a physics lab so they had aluminum foil, gold foil, tantalum foil, stainless foil and all kinds of almost foil like brass so of course it mattered. And it was a good lesson as in research you always need to be thinking about why you are doing the thing you are doing and what effect all you instrument design choices will have.

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    How about. Wing nutt
    Off a tooth

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill D View Post
    ...My brother had his Lucas generator burn up and drain the battery while the car was parked. It might have been the Lucas voltage regulator as the root cause.
    Bill D.
    When I was in college I worked in an import car repair shop. Guy brought in a TR6 one day, every time you turned on the windshield wipers the horn would honk in perfect time with the wipers. It wouldn't just stay on- it was one honk per sweep.

    We never did figure out exactly what was going on. By the time it was fixed we had replaced all the under-dash relays and the entire wiring harness.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jancollc View Post
    When I was in college I worked in an import car repair shop. Guy brought in a TR6 one day, every time you turned on the windshield wipers the horn would honk in perfect time with the wipers. It wouldn't just stay on- it was one honk per sweep.

    We never did figure out exactly what was going on. By the time it was fixed we had replaced all the under-dash relays and the entire wiring harness.
    My brothers car was also a Trimuph. I think he had two of them. Nice wood on the dash.
    Bill

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    Quote Originally Posted by MrWhoopee View Post
    unobtanium = material selected by the engineer without checking availability
    Costomuchium


    Overpriced stock when likely, 1018 would have sufficed.


    Or the engineer that specs d2 instead of a2, just to mess with you.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Monomer View Post
    Costomuchium


    Overpriced stock when likely, 1018 would have sufficed.


    Or the engineer that specs d2 instead of a2, just to mess with you.
    That's a new one to me, I'll have to reference it.

    Falling more into humor, and it's been a while since I worked in cycling, but "drillium" and "speed holes" were common themes. Also saw MIL-TFP-1111 on a print once at a previous job.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jccaclimber View Post
    That's a new one to me, I'll have to reference it.

    Falling more into humor, and it's been a while since I worked in cycling, but "drillium" and "speed holes" were common themes. Also saw MIL-TFP-1111 on a print once at a previous job.
    Once in awhile we spec MIL-TFP-41C, especially if we’re using a junior tech.

    My father installed and terminated wiring harnesses in aircraft and worked 30 years for Southern Bell. It’s not politically correct, but i learned wire snips were “dikes”.

    In aircraft manufacturing you often hear a reference to “dotco” those edges or knock it down with a “dotco”. Dotco is a manufacturer of pneumatic die grinders amongst other pneumatic tools.

    Ryan


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