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  1. #1
    mjk
    mjk is offline Stainless
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    Just recently purchased a 15" planer made in Taiwan. Weighs probably 400lbs+, 2HP 3-belt drive, 4 tube with cast iron base, table and cutter housing..built 1987.
    Doing a search I didn't find any trace of manufacture other than some people looking for manuals.
    Was AMT a "group" of smaller unnamed companies?

  2. #2
    L Vanice is online now Diamond
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    AMT (American Machine and Tool Company) is an old American company. Their primary product line is now pumps. For a while in the late 20th Century, they had a sideline in woodworking tools, mostly made in Taiwan. I used to get their catalogs and own their 6" jointer and a number of carving chisels. Sears even sold some of their brass frame woodworking planes at one time. I don't recall the year, but they dropped the woodworking business years ago. AMT is now a part of another pump company. They probably have no interest in supporting the Taiwan planers, but they may have sold that part of the business to someone who offers support. The phone call is free.

    AMT Pump website

    AMT, A Subsidiary of The Gorman-Rupp Company
    Pump Designers - Engineers - Manufacturers
    400 Spring Street
    Royersford, PA 19468

    Tel: 888.268.7867 (888-AMT-PUMP)
    Fax: 610.948.5300
    e-mail: sales@amtpump.com
    www.amtpump.com

    Old Woodworking Machines site entry for AMT says, "For some time, AMT has specialized in the design and manufacture of pumps. In February 2002, AMT was acquired by Gorman-Rupp Co. of Mansfield, OH. AMT no longer has any information on their old woodworking machinery products, and does not provide support."

    Larry

  3. #3
    mike 44 is offline Cast Iron
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    That's a pretty decent planer. My grandfathers neighbor bought it in the early 80's as I recall.
    Probably equates with an $800.00 planer today.
    Larry gave you good info on AMC & Tools.Planer was made in Taiwan.I called after reading your post to see if they had a manual for the machine. No luck,machine was sold for $100.00 in 2005.If you need a manual or parts,download a grizzly machine of similar specs. Most planers were taiwan made, many different brands in same factories. Sometimes only superficial changes were made such as color.From experience I have found that every Taiwan planer uses standard cutters available from many sources.

    mike

  4. #4
    mjk
    mjk is offline Stainless
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    I had looked at the Grizzly site and didn't see anything simular.
    The Makita 2040 or more so the Jet JWP-15CS is almost identical except for the lower cabinet.
    I recognized the AMT name from a few small hand planes that I had purchased in the early 80's.
    Mike

  5. #5
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    My first table saw, around 1965, was a tiny 8" AMT (with their name on the saw) sold by Sears. The top of the saw was about 18" square, so small that the instructions that came with the saw gave details on how to build a useful sized top by fitting the saw into a bench

    Paid $20 IIRC, without motor. Found a half horse motor & mounted it to a plate on the back of the saw. The plate used a thin piece of tubing as a hinge, and belt tension was determined by the weight of the motor. Total weight, without motor, probably 40 to 50 pounds.

    --------------
    Barry Milton

  6. #6
    Ries's Avatar
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    I wonder if those old Sears/AMT tools were made by the same company that sold the Taiwanese tools later on.

    I owned several tools made by them, and they are what I think of when I use the term "americrap"- which was the original homegrown junk, before we outsourced it to china.
    That table saw- man, I was 19, and didnt see anythig wrong with ripping 4x8 sheets of 3/4" plywood on it. Kinda like elephants balancing on footstools.

    The good old days may just be good because they are gone, to misquote Loudon Wainwright.

    I sure dont miss my AMT tools- as I recall, they used to advertise in the back of comic books- get a whole woodworking shop for $100- of course, they didnt mention it would fit in your kitchen drawer...

  7. #7
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    they are what I think of when I use the term "americrap"
    Ain't that the truth. Everything made by AMT was undersized, underbuilt, underdesigned. But for those times (1945 - 1965) the tools found a niche. Home workshops were a big deal in the years after the war, and money was tight, so AMT sold a ton of "benchtop" tools.

    IIRC, they sold two models of wood lathe. The light duty model had oilite bronze bushings in the headstock, the HD model had ball bearings.

    I found this on the OWWM site: They advertised in Popular Mechanics: a 1961 ad shows their 8" tablesaw ("over 400,000 sold") for $9.95. By 1965 they were asking $14.95. Motors were not included in the price. Since I paid $20 for mine, I surely got the deluxe model

    -------------
    Barry Milton

  8. #8
    Bill D is online now Titanium
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    I bought there little jointer from sears around 1980 or a little earlier. I thin kit was 3 or 4". It was made in USA they made a big deal that it used regular hardware store bolts etc. Used faucet handles for table adjustment knobs.
    Bill D.

  9. #9
    Ries's Avatar
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    I, too, had the jointer. And a little bandsaw.
    They worked, sorta. And I didnt know much better anyway.

    Bad as they were, though, they were still far better than the next generation of Sears "power tools".
    In the 70's, there were virtually no asian imports on the market, and industrial american tools were fearsomely expensive- so Sears was the only game in town for low priced tools, and the stuff they sold was a curious amalgam of plastic and sheet metal, held together with self tapping screws. Which would vibrate loose, or the plastic would just melt and drop em out. My belt disc sander, from that era, was about as low as you could go. As part after part fell off, broke, or just disintegrated into dust, it became more and more bare bones and cobbled together. I believe I paid around $250 for it- so I ran it for years to get my money's worth- but man, was it a POS. It was made by Emerson, I believe- and within a couple of years, Sears had stopped stocking parts- it was right around the time they downsized drastically, dropping stores left and right.

    My current sander, a taiwan made Jet, is about ten times the machine, for about twice the price.

  10. #10
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    A salesperson tried to sell me a replacement stainless centrifugal pump today. Claimed it cost only a little more than the Chinese copy, made in the USA by ... you guessed it, AMT. I suggested that he study AMT's history before endorsing that company.

    He quoted $735 for AMT model 4895-98. I found that same pump, made God knows where, for $320. I really don't expect it to be any worse than the AMT model, unless they've had a religous conversion

    ------------
    Barry Milton

  11. #11
    chinahand's Avatar
    chinahand is offline Stainless
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    In Taiwan, there are 2 machine tool relating companies called AMT(But different Chinese names), one is known for linear roller way.

    Chinahand

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