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  1. #1
    Uncle Ethan is offline Aluminum
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    Oct 2006
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    Southeastern New Mexico
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    Default Building a tool to stake the tube on a 1911

    I'm building a tool for staking the tube for the detents on a 1911 frame. The tube is .150 in diameter and height. I want to machine a slot with a full radius in a piece of Aluminum to protect the tube from damage when I stake it. Can a end mill be ground from a .150 diameter drill? I would cut it shorter than a stubbie, use the sears drill sharpening fixture to grind a radius on it, and grind reliefs in the two flutes. Would that work?

  2. #2
    Experimental is offline Aluminum
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    Aug 2006
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    Fayetteville,North Carolina
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    Default Stake

    A drill bit will not cut from the side like a endmill. The drill bit will flex. You would need a endmill.

  3. #3
    pgfaini's Avatar
    pgfaini is offline Cast Iron
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    May 2007
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    Golden Valley, NC
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    Default

    You can protect the tube by inserting a piece of drill rod, or the shank of a drill. Don't remember the size, though. The simplest way to make a grooved anvil, is to clamp two pieces of stock together, and drill down between them with a #25 (.1495") or #24 (.1520") drill.
    Paul

  4. #4
    Uncle Ethan is offline Aluminum
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by pgfaini View Post
    You can protect the tube by inserting a piece of drill rod, or the shank of a drill. Don't remember the size, though. The simplest way to make a grooved anvil, is to clamp two pieces of stock together, and drill down between them with a #25 (.1495") or #24 (.1520") drill.
    Paul
    OK, now that makes sense. Instead of buying a one time ball end mill or trying to turn a shortened drill into a endmill use your method and then build up either side of the radius with stock to bring the height to .150- making a pair of pliers into a flaring tool was as far as I could take it. Thanks to both replies.

  5. #5
    Rustystud Guest

    Default Holes and how to make them..

    Fist thisng to know drill bits don't cut round or straight holes.

    End mills are designed to cut linear holes.

    Reamers "supposedly" round up drilled holes.

    Real round holes are cut with a boring bar.

    We do the best with what we have.

    Rustystud

  6. #6
    Webb Wyman is offline Stainless
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    Oct 2001
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    Lewes, DE.
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    Default

    Hi There,

    One thought I have is to drill a hole in a suitable piece of metal,
    using a drill with the same diameter as the radius outside section
    of the plunger tube. Then mill the piece of metal so that 1/2 of
    the hole is removed (axially), leaving a "U" shaped channel. This
    will form a "backing" block for the plunger tube that will distribute
    the pressure evenly over the surface of the plunger tube while
    staking and will significantly reduce the tendency to crush the tube.
    Inserting a rod inside the plunger tube (as previously mentioned)
    will add even more.

    Good Luck!
    -Blue Chips-
    Webb

  7. #7
    biometrics's Avatar
    biometrics is offline Cast Iron
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    Northern VA
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    Smile Staking the safety tube on a 1911

    This is my first post on this forum. I haven't done this in years... sold all my equipment years ago, and had a different white collar career, but I am just getting back into it as I move toward my retirement age...

    When I was building 1911's from parts kits and new frames back in the 1970's, the master gunsmith I apprenticed with had a slick tool he had created exactly for this purpose. He had taken an inexpensive needle-nose vice-grip tool whose jaws remained parallel when closed. He cut half the length off the jaws, and then softened the largest jaw with a torch. Then he took a round rat tail file the correct size and manually cut a half moon shape in the soft jaw. In the other jaw, he drilled a hole for pin that he had turned that had an appropriate taper to expand the hole in the stud on the for the part. The part was placed on the frame in the correct position, and a long pin punch of the appropriate diameter was put in the tube. The tool was then used to install and swage the hollow stud to the frame. Total time for installation? less than 60 seconds... (once you own the tool of course)...

    A simple tool to make and an easy job it makes of this task. I hope this explanation has been helpful
    Last edited by biometrics; 05-13-2008 at 03:00 PM. Reason: misspelling

  8. #8
    wlbrown is offline Hot Rolled
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    Nov 2002
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    wright city, mo.
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    Default building a tool to

    SIR,
    i have some books on the 1911, and one of these
    has a complete set of plans for building some of the
    special tooling for working on this pistol. i remember
    the one for staking the tube. the plans call for a pin
    made from cr rod, or drill rod. this is used to keep the
    tube from damage while it is installed. the holder is milled
    in a V for the tube to set in. the book is called. THE COLT
    45 AUTO PISTOL, by DESERT PUBLICATIONS. i have no idea
    if this book is still available, as i have had it for many years.
    it was reprinted in 1978.
    DESERT PUBLICATIONS, CORNVILLE,ARIZONA 86325
    good luck with your project.
    wlbrown

  9. #9
    LeftHander is offline Aluminum
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    Oct 2006
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    San Jose
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    Default

    If you look in Brownell's, you will find the tools already made to do this job. The main tool is a modified ViseGrip. The saddle is there, plus a pin to put inside the tube to keep from distorting it.
    080-806-500
    Plunger Tube Crimper Kit about $75


    Will

  10. #10
    SamD is offline Plastic
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    Aug 2004
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    NM
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    13

    Default

    I quit staking Plunger tubes along time ago.
    Just sweat them on. They stay forever and never come loose.

    Sam

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