Qt. Home made inletting black
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  1. #1
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    Smile Qt. Home made inletting black

    Hello, I hav been using an inletting black I made for about 10 years. Read it in a old gunsmith book. It consists of petroleum jelly, lamp black, and mineral oil. I am just too stuborn to buy the suff. I read that cold cream could be used instead of the jelly. Any tips? Thanks, Alan

  2. #2
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    Dark color lipstick works well. It is easy to remove after you finish and generally smells better than the home brew stuff. You might have a female friend that has one or two to donate for trial.

    RWO

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    I have a small oil lamp that i use to soot my parts with.
    It works the best of everything i have tried but it is by no means perfect.

  4. #4
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    Smile Tips

    Thanks folks, I bought a tube of red lipstick to try. Did not realize how expensive the stuff is . $4 for the cheap stuff. Also, I was wondering if the old timers in the late 1800s used a lamp to soot up their work? It seems the thinner the "black" the closer the fit could be. I remember about 15 years ago,I used a red marking pen. It worked well. The stuff I made works good for most uses, But I plan to restock some fine doubles next summer. I also need to make some scrapers. Cheers,Alan

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    Alan, tear off a strip of regular old masking tape, double the sticky side back on itself, hold one end and light the other, gives off a nice black soot.
    James

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    Yes, I read that the "old timers" used oil lamps to soot their parts.

  7. #7
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    Smile inletting

    Ok, just dug out one of my older gunsmithing books by Roy Dunlap. He mentions the various methods and claims his best is a cream rouge in a shade of red. He says the best ones are not particularly greasy. Of coarse this is an old book and I am thinking cream rouges have changed through the years. I think the color red has its advantages, but I will try the soot method too. Thanks for everyones imput. Cheers,Alan

  8. #8
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    The old boys in Birmingham used to have gas loghts in the shop and then had a small glass spirit burner with a wick that was small enough to blow out. they lit the burner from the gas lamp and did the soot job then blew it out.
    Peter


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