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Thread: remington 700 bolt threading fixture

  1. #21
    glbreil is offline Cast Iron
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    I believe he is probably cutting a 5/16" stub and if you break it aff after it has been tightened against the shoulder, you might need to full length resize your brass or reduce your load.

  2. #22
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    you are correct, it is 5/16-24. i am also leaving approximately 1/4" of unthreaded shank. i see lots of people threading right to the shoulder and in my opinion, that is inviting failure. creating a stress riser right at the shoulder at the already weakest spot isn't the best idea in my mind. once the bolt knob is epoxied on, i feel my method is plenty strong.

    the thought has crossed my mind to eliminate the threads all together. i'd just machine a smooth shank and have my knobs slip fit. i would then use a retaining compound such as loctite 680.

  3. #23
    Lumberjack is online now Aluminum
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    I get your point regarding time and efficiency :-)

    Gluing is a good Idea for the right circumstances. But think twice with special regard to the materials and temperature.
    Good would be to make a very coarse surface finish and use a glue that doesnīt get brittle in cold, still with warning on plastic and aluminium handles. Also need to consider strong solvents.
    If you can hold tols you might consider shrink it together, then thereīs nothing getting deteriorated.

    I think itīs a little over-kill to threadmill that. Would it be faster for you to thread with a die in a dieholder since you still have to change tooling? (Donīt tell me now you got a big automatic tool magazine and itīs just a push on button.....thatīs cheating ;-) )

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lumberjack View Post
    I get your point regarding time and efficiency :-)

    Gluing is a good Idea for the right circumstances. But think twice with special regard to the materials and temperature.
    Good would be to make a very coarse surface finish and use a glue that doesnīt get brittle in cold, still with warning on plastic and aluminium handles. Also need to consider strong solvents.
    If you can hold tols you might consider shrink it together, then thereīs nothing getting deteriorated.

    I think itīs a little over-kill to threadmill that. Would it be faster for you to thread with a die in a dieholder since you still have to change tooling? (Donīt tell me now you got a big automatic tool magazine and itīs just a push on button.....thatīs cheating ;-) )
    it's just a personal thing but i hate thread dies. if i was doing this to make money, i'd go to a insert style, full profile thread mill. it would save about 2+ minutes off of the job. i just can't justify the cost of the tooling as a hobbyist doing this for friends. shrink fit is not a bad idea and it has certainly crossed my mind. it's very rare that i say this but i don't think it warrants the effort. it's just a bolt knob.

    and no, i don't have an automatic tool changer. my tool changes are done manually with a manual drawbar. the tool holders are repeatable and the offsets are stored in the controller though.

  5. #25
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    I don't want to hijack your post and nice work but my son wanted his Rem 700 bolt threaded and i don't have a mill just a small lathe so heres what i came up with. I made a block to hold the bolt on the compound and turned off the knob with a boring bar mounted to the spindle. I can angle the bolt body if wanted for a swept back knob. Just my thoughts...Bob
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails bolt-jig.jpg   bolt-jig-2.jpg   bolt-jig-3.jpg  
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  6. #26
    Dan Carey is offline Plastic
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    How about the original PTG or the newer phase II Remington 700 Bolt Handle Threading Fixture?

  7. #27
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    Question presented.... Why must it be threaded on? To unscrew it to look at the threads? Best to weld it on. The removable idea is for those who like to see it screw on and off. Just sayin'. If you are a real tactical shooter, ie taking out perps and bad guys as needed, the larger knob is meant for quick follow ups (cycling the action faster) if a tacticool guy wanting to see threading.....get real

  8. #28
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    We weld ours on if you didn't get our drift before. Chucker will be proud

  9. #29
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    Threading gives options to change knobs if desired.

  10. #30
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    Well I have to say that is slick way of doing it, I have a mill but think the next time I will use your method, nice job !!
    Quote Originally Posted by aametalmaster View Post
    I don't want to hijack your post and nice work but my son wanted his Rem 700 bolt threaded and i don't have a mill just a small lathe so heres what i came up with. I made a block to hold the bolt on the compound and turned off the knob with a boring bar mounted to the spindle. I can angle the bolt body if wanted for a swept back knob. Just my thoughts...Bob

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    Quote Originally Posted by adc1963 View Post
    Well I have to say that is slick way of doing it, I have a mill but think the next time I will use your method, nice job !!
    Thank You...Bob
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    Quote Originally Posted by aametalmaster View Post
    I don't want to hijack your post and nice work but my son wanted his Rem 700 bolt threaded and i don't have a mill just a small lathe so heres what i came up with. I made a block to hold the bolt on the compound and turned off the knob with a boring bar mounted to the spindle. I can angle the bolt body if wanted for a swept back knob. Just my thoughts...Bob
    If you had a couple hundred bux you could buy a used Atlas or Southbend milling attachment for that little machine off FleaWay to get a third axis, stand it on end and you would have a small mill. Or you could use it the way it is, on its side. I have seen guys do some pretty remarkable things with milling attachments in lathes. Be it a bit unorthodox, there is always a way to get things done with what you have.

  13. #33
    adc1963 is offline Plastic
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    Hey Bob, I meant to ask, did you thread your sons handle or just make it press fit..??

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    Quote Originally Posted by adc1963 View Post
    Hey Bob, I meant to ask, did you thread your sons handle or just make it press fit..??
    It is threaded 5/16-24...Bob
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 700-bolt-knob.jpg  
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    Quote Originally Posted by aametalmaster View Post
    It is threaded 5/16-24...Bob
    +1

    That seems to be the size for all the aftermarket knobs.

    Has anyone tried the reinforcement method used by Short Action Customs? Here's what they say:

    Due to the Remington manufacturing process, cavities are often present inside the handle. The standard bolt knob conversion can greatly weaken the transition from handle to bolt knob. For Remington 700 bolts, we drill out the center of the shaft and the handle, tap the hole for 10/32, and insert a hardened steel screw re-enforced with Loc-tite 271 and then face off for a clean finish. This strengthens the joint from the handle to shaft that other conversions can fail under normal conditions; that is Short Action Customs, LLC innovation!
    badgerknobinstall2.jpg

    Or cut half an inch off & drill & tap for a 5/16 - 24 stud which seems like a better way all around.

  16. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by precisionworks View Post
    +1


    Has anyone tried the reinforcement method used by Short Action Customs? Here's what they say:



    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	badgerknobinstall2.jpg 
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    i still think my method is as strong without inserting the stud. i counterbore the knob so it is a close fit on a short shank. once it is glued on, any force applied to the knob is being transferred to the shank and shoulder, not the threads. i have yet to see any porosity daylight in the shank i form.

    i cringe when i see threads cut all the way to the shoulder on one of these installs, especially when it becomes an interrupted cut. that is creating a terrible stress riser at the worst possible place.




  17. #37
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    Default remington 700 bolt threading fixture

    Beautiful install

  18. #38
    butchlambert is offline Aluminum
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    You know? Why don't you send your bolt to Dan Armstrong Welcome to Accu-TIG and have a new bolt handle tigged on? No soldered handle to fall off, better bolt timing, and no expense for a knob and labor.

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    Quote Originally Posted by precisionworks View Post
    +1

    That seems to be the size for all the aftermarket knobs.

    Has anyone tried the reinforcement method used by Short Action Customs? Here's what they say:



    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	badgerknobinstall2.jpg 
Views:	540 
Size:	57.7 KB 
ID:	80391

    Or cut half an inch off & drill & tap for a 5/16 - 24 stud which seems like a better way all around.
    I don't know if installing a small stud inside is really going to strengthen it much. All you are doing is removing metal to instal metal and the area occupied by the thread is lost for axial strength so I think you may just be weakening it. I think I would just silver solder on a new handle if I found a large void in the cintered steel handle (I never have found a void to date). Adding a pin seams like a bit of a cheap shortcut. I have found that the common cause of breakage is from the furnace weld breaking because of added force generated by the added length creating more leverage against the weld or using 1/4 inch threads. I try to keep the added length to a minimum.


    gunsmith-rod-henrickson-0282.jpggunsmith-rod-henrickson-0283.jpg

  20. #40
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    TIG welded handles can fall off too. seen it happen more than once.

    personally, i think the best option for a m700 is waiting until a new barrel is to be installed and have a true one-piece bolt ptg bolt fit at that time.

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