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  1. #1
    ar.guy is offline Junior Member
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    Does any one know where there is any help for a fool that is trying to restock a double barrel, any media would be welcome. Have experience on doing rifles, but this is a new game. Is glass beding accepted? Thanks for your help ....

  2. #2
    imported_brian_m is offline Aluminum
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    Depends on the shotgun. I believe the company that used to be called Fajen is still in business. They had a vast selection of stocks in all grades of wood and finishes.

    Brian

  3. #3
    ulav8r is offline Cast Iron
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    Fajen has been out of business for many years. Midway bout out most of their stocks and still sells one or two designs with the Fajen name on them.

    Restocking a double is the same as any other gun. Cut away anything that does not look like a stock. [img]smile.gif[/img] Make sure that you do not bend sideplates or tangs if present. An L.C. Smith is a real stinker to fit. The upper tang and trigger plate alignment is determined by the stock, and any misalignment affects the function of the triggers and safety.

  4. #4
    s7hss is offline Aluminum
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    Wenig supplies stock blanks, if that's what you need. They're in the business of stock fitting, but don't see much info on their website.

  5. #5
    ar.guy is offline Junior Member
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    Thanks for the help. Not sure I said what I need correctly.
    I have the wood,a blank, so it can be any thing I tell it to be. Have started w/ the top tang and w/ the aid of the Bridgeport and a lot of hand fitting have it and the front face of the stock fitting good and solid. Going to the bottom tang next but have the feeling I'm working in the dark. There has been a lot of double barrels restocked ,some one must have written down what they learned in doing this work. Probly learned "not to do this again".
    Thats what I need in book, magazine, video or any other form.
    HELP....Guy
    Hope it's not an art form that remain a secret forever.

  6. #6
    ulav8r is offline Cast Iron
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    As I said before, somewhat incorrectly, the alignment of the tangs can be altered by the fit of the stock. Just work carefully to maintain correct alignment while fitting the stock.

    Study the action and tangs with the stock removed. If everything works properly maintain the alignment as you inlet the stock. Work toward getting full support of the tangs without changing their alignment. Then ensure that you have proper clearances for the fire control mechanisms.

    This message comes to you from the far side.

  7. #7
    zero is offline Senior Member
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    May 2004
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    Find one that will fit with minimal fitting
    have one semi inlet and finish as any other stock
    have the curent stock duplicated just undersize for the inlet and over size for the rest of the stock...

  8. #8
    dvice is offline Hot Rolled
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    man you gys all seem to be missing his question all together!

    he is looking for literature, or other media to LEARN how to fit a double..not anyone particular gun...

    TIPS on doing it.

    a book that showed the basic tools , especially any specialty tools for inletting , and fitting a stock to the action...and set ups that are used to do any hard areas, or to facilitate the difficult steps in fitting the action...

    I have been looking for a similar book, becasue id like to restock a browning sxs I have.

    I wonder what percentage is done with which machine or tool, and then i figure the rest is done with files , and specialty scrapers..maybe even sandpaper.....but i would suspect with fine fitting doubles the sand paper isnt used as much , because it is difficult to keep a surface flat and straight.

    I think If i could pull the dimensions off the action I could come up with a matching program on my GIBBS cam to machine the wood in a cnc miller...at least get it real close.

    obviously there are certain actions that would be more difficult and or tricky...because of the thin sections of wood in various spots.

    Id still love to hear someone come up with a book title they found about the subject...I doubt there is a video, and I dont think a voice tape would help much.

    bob

  9. #9
    ar.guy is offline Junior Member
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    You got the idea Bob.

    I'v already jumped in to the project, now I need to know how to proceed and in what manner. Been lots of this work done but so far it has not been well recorded, maybe doubles are really going away-sad.

    I did get a wake up call from ulav8r, when I started checking the alinement of things the nice solid fit I had on the top tang and front face was pointing the gun in the wrong direction, the pitch,drop and etc were not meeting up w/ the wood I had avaiable. So now I get to move it back and do it all over again. Because I had not started on the lower tang I think I can save it.

    That's why I'm doing this and it looks like the "school of hard knocks" is the way we have to learn about doubles/restocking-no short cuts.

    Guy

  10. #10
    ahall is offline Stainless
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    I have fitted a couple, but always by hand, and on junk shotguns just for practice. Figured I could not go wrong, and would learn something befor I tried my hand on something that counted.
    Actualy came up with some reasonabley nice stocks.

    My experianc is that the "ready to go stocks" for shotguns are usualy designed for O/U guns, not Side by Side. Those that are parialy inleted for side by sides are typicaly for LC's, Parkers, and other upper end guns. Try finding a partialy inleted stock for a Crescent or some mule eared antique, good luck.

    The biggest trick I have encountered is getting everything started square and true. I always started with a stripped action, and inlet the top tang. This allows me to adjust the drop in the stock before making any other cuts. Once you start in on the lower tang your commited because you cut the inlet for the triggers. Start the lower tang, but leave the wrist thick and dont inlet it any more than necessary to hold the action firmly to the stock.

    Get the upper and lower tangs fit/ triggers, then strip the side locks and fit the lock plates.

    Then reassamble the locks and inlet for the lock work. Finaly adjust the fit of the lower tang to match the lock work. Its easier to cut away wood than it is to put it back.

    Finaly fit the trigger guard and cut the stock for lenght of pull and put on the but plate.

    Once thats done finish shaping the wrist and fit

    Bottom line, its a pain.

    As to glass bedding, I have read that Marlin used glass bedding on some of the LC Smiths they produced many years ago. As long as the bedding is not visable on the finished gun, I see no problem with it. It should improve the fit and strengthen the stock if done properly.

    Lets face it, the sleak light lines of old side lock doubles create weak stocks. Those stocks can use a little help from modern technology.

  11. #11
    Jerald MI. is offline Hot Rolled
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    You might ask on www.gunshop.com , ask if there is a text on the subject.-Jerald

  12. #12
    ar.guy is offline Junior Member
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    Thanks to Jerald MI for the lead to the www.gunshop.com site. There is a bunch of guys on there that have been a help. Still don't have a pubication that tells me how to restock , but still hoping....Guy

  13. #13
    dvice is offline Hot Rolled
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    I am sure I saw a picture or a series of pictures of a restocking job on a double gun. And I think I remember the stock was left rather large and bulky until AFTER the action was fitting( like a big retangle block of wood).. then it was roughed down to maybe an 1/8 or less to final dimensions... that way it was all set for cast on or off, and drop....relative to the barrels-action. But remember many of these pictures and or book you get will be how it was done in the old days by hand!....a long process for sure.. thats why they cost so much....

    bob

  14. #14
    Astolfo is offline Aluminum
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    The easiest way is to copy the old stock on a carving-copying machine and then fit it by hand. Many places offer the service of copying the old pattern into a blank of your choice. I did the same, quite a while back, with an old Parker; a place in Kelowna, British Columbia did a very nice job on the rough inletting on a piece of walnut. Still, it is a lot of hand fitting after. And glass bedding is not an option...

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