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  1. #1
    bellinoracing is offline Hot Rolled
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    Default Questions tips on setting up a Haas TM1 VMC??

    Well I finally made a deal for a Haas TM1 vmc machine today so now I am nervous about getting it unloaded, set up, and running. I have a buddy thats a master electrician so getting it wired shouldn't be a problem. We will be wiring it to run single phase so hopefully it likes that as much as it likes three phase. I plan to unload it myself with a rented 5,000 lb fork lift, I was just told to make sure it has 6' forks. I am going to have to squeeze it through a 7' high door which I was told can be done but it will be tight.

    Any tips for me so far?

    Now for the questions...How do I level it? I can throw a carpenters level on the table but I doubt thats going to be accurate enough.

    I plan to get a filter and water trap for the air line but what specifically should I get? To my understanding some machines run air through the spindle bearings and some don't. Its important for all machines to have clean dry air but thats especially important if they put air through the spindle bearings. Do these TM1s push air through the spindle bearings?

    Finally coolant. What do I need and where do I get it? Most people agree blaser swisslube is good, I have never used anything but that so I wouldnt know if there was anything better. I heard liquid ice was good as well. Where do you buy coolant? I havent seen anything but cheap off brands sold through MSC and enco. Hopefully I can buy just 1 gallon of coolant, I think that would be more than enough for me for a while.

    Thanks for any comments

  2. #2
    Northern is offline Plastic
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    I believe HAAS claims the machine does not need to be leveled to a high degree of precision such as its larger brothers, but I do not believe that. Level it to .0005" / 12" with a machinists level.

    You'll want a refrigerant air dryer to dry the air. A moisture trap is not sufficient. No air through the spindle bearings, but air is used to actuate the draw bar pressure plate. You do not want to corrode this hardware.

  3. #3
    PaulT is offline Stainless
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    Quote Originally Posted by bellinoracing View Post
    Now for the questions...How do I level it? I can throw a carpenters level on the table but I doubt thats going to be accurate enough.
    Don't over stress on this one, a good carpenters level is good enough, there's no real point in going beyond that.

    Best of luck with the machine, and here's the CNC crash avoiding tips I wish some one had told me before I busted up a lot of stuff.

    If possible, always set up your workpiece so the top of it is above your vise jaws.
    This minimizes accident jogs and moves into the vise.

    Don't ever use MDI commands to position the machine, only use jogging and the MPG.
    There was a thread on here a few years back on bad CNC crashes and 90% of the really bad ones were from MDI command typos.

    Always single step through any manually written G code the first time you run it.

    Paul T.
    Power Technology

  4. #4
    behindpropellers is offline Stainless
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    Default

    I was told not to worry about how level but to make sure the spindle is trammed to the table and the torque of the back feet was the same, ditto for the front.

    Did you get the probe/toolsetter?

  5. #5
    bellinoracing is offline Hot Rolled
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    Quote Originally Posted by PaulT View Post
    Don't over stress on this one, a good carpenters level is good enough, there's no real point in going beyond that.

    Best of luck with the machine, and here's the CNC crash avoiding tips I wish some one had told me before I busted up a lot of stuff.

    If possible, always set up your workpiece so the top of it is above your vise jaws.
    This minimizes accident jogs and moves into the vise.

    Don't ever use MDI commands to position the machine, only use jogging and the MPG.
    There was a thread on here a few years back on bad CNC crashes and 90% of the really bad ones were from MDI command typos.

    Always single step through any manually written G code the first time you run it.

    Paul T.
    Power Technology
    Thanks Paul thats good advice. I never even thought of using MDI to position the machine. I have only used MDI for tool changes and turning the spindle on.

  6. #6
    bellinoracing is offline Hot Rolled
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    Quote Originally Posted by Northern View Post
    I believe HAAS claims the machine does not need to be leveled to a high degree of precision such as its larger brothers, but I do not believe that. Level it to .0005" / 12" with a machinists level.

    You'll want a refrigerant air dryer to dry the air. A moisture trap is not sufficient. No air through the spindle bearings, but air is used to actuate the draw bar pressure plate. You do not want to corrode this hardware.
    That would make sense that the smaller the machine is the less important leveling is, but the more level you can get it the better off you will be. Any specific brand of air dryer that anyone would suggest?

  7. #7
    bellinoracing is offline Hot Rolled
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    Quote Originally Posted by behindpropellers View Post
    I was told not to worry about how level but to make sure the spindle is trammed to the table and the torque of the back feet was the same, ditto for the front.

    Did you get the probe/toolsetter?
    What do you mean by trammed to the table? You're saying you want to check that the spindle is square to the table like you would on a manual mill? Is there an adjustment for that or can you just "tweak" the machine by putting different amounts of pressure on different feet. I like the same torque for the back feet idea.

    Yeah this machine has I think just about every possible option on it including the probe, tool setter, and the 4th axis wiring. Looks like buying $20 starret edge finders and struggling to see them is a thing of the past for me.

    I will post some more info and pics of the machine once I have it.

  8. #8
    Jon Bohlander's Avatar
    Jon Bohlander is offline Stainless
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    Don't ever use MDI commands to position the machine, only use jogging and the MPG
    I have to disagree with that. I find positioning in MDI a great timesaver. Why have a CNC machine and turn a handle? The best ways to avoid crashing are:

    -paying attention to what you are doing (biggest cause of my crashes Hell, I have bumped into stuff using the pulse handle and being distracted.)
    -turning the feeds & rapids down while proving in a prgram or moving in MDI
    -feed holding when the tool gets close to the workpiece & checking the distance to go & eyeball comparing that to the actual distancebetween the tool and work
    -double-checking for typos (another big one. A decimal in the wrong place makes for a bad day. I learned that my very first day on a CNC)
    -always having your finger hovering over the feed hold.
    - Using graphics to check your tool paths. Haas graphics aren't great but they will catch big typos such as negative when it should have been positive.

    All this applies to proving in a new program or moving in MDI. Never push the green button and assume everything will be fine. Garbage in and all that.

  9. #9
    mikeknell is offline Aluminum
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    When I got a Haas, I paid for the 4-hour training by the Haas distributor (Selway is the Haas distributor in my area).

    When I go my second Haas, I again, paid for the 4-hour training.

    Get the training -- money well spent.

    Normally, the person sent to do the training is also a repair tech, so they can give you a lot of information into what not to do.

  10. #10
    Kevin Wilkins's Avatar
    Kevin Wilkins is offline Cast Iron
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikeknell View Post
    When I got a Haas, I paid for the 4-hour training by the Haas distributor (Selway is the Haas distributor in my area).

    When I go my second Haas, I again, paid for the 4-hour training.

    Get the training -- money well spent.

    Normally, the person sent to do the training is also a repair tech, so they can give you a lot of information into what not to do.
    That is some real good advice! Indeed, money very well spent.

    I'd also suggest buying a good set of vibration dampening feet for the machine to replace the solid ones Haas provides. I did this with my machine when I bought it.

  11. #11
    Toolchaser is offline Aluminum
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    A 6k # pallet jack is handy for final positioning. if your buying it new the Haas tech should level it for you. Check with a local rigger, I had a great crew from AL that received the mill, delivered it , unloaded it, and hauled off the pallet for $500 a few years back. For them carrying the liability I thought that was a sweet deal.
    As far as a regulators theres one built on the mill, but I have a SMC water seperator plumbed in upstream.As far as coolant my only tip is some synthetics will make the paint age prematurely.

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