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  1. #1
    Janz99 is offline Plastic
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    Default Squaring a VF2 and Vf3 table?

    We have a vf2 and vf3 at work, and when we put a granite square on the tables, they are out .003 and .006 over aprox 20". We'd like to try and adjust the tables, so we're looking for any advice we can get since I've never done it before, and we cant get a hold of the service guy that came in and did it last time.

    I should mention, both machines are early 2000's.


    Thanks
    Ryan

  2. #2
    machineit2 is offline Cast Iron
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    Quote Originally Posted by Janz99 View Post
    We have a vf2 and vf3 at work, and when we put a granite square on the tables, they are out .003 and .006 over aprox 20". We'd like to try and adjust the tables, so we're looking for any advice we can get since I've never done it before, and we cant get a hold of the service guy that came in and did it last time.

    Thanks
    Ryan
    Use a precision and level "THE MACHINE!!" The table will be fine. Use all 6 feet and make it level with equal weight on the four corners at least and also some one the middle feet.

    Use a level of about .0005" per 10" or better.

    Mike

  3. #3
    Janz99 is offline Plastic
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    We've actually already level'd both machines. We though that was the problem at first, but it turns out its not.

  4. #4
    sagespecialized is offline Cast Iron
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    Default

    Put an indicator in the spindle.

    Move it to one corner of the table, zero the indicator. I also mark zero on the table with a sharpe so I don't get lost.

    Move the table under the indicator to each corner and take a reading. Again I write it on the table.

    As you adjust the feet the table will square up under the indicator, Just like your indicating a fixture in vise jaws, in this case you would use a shim to bring a corner up, or your dead blow to seat it better. Same principle. But now your shims are the feet on the machine.

    Go slow, make a move with the feet, then check all four corners again. rewrite your new values on the table. Repeat.

    Your total indicator reading should be .0005 or less, when you get there lock the feet down with the jam nuts, and recheck.

    Level isn't important, it just dictates which way the coolant is going to flow in the bottom of the bed.

    If you don't achieve the .0005 reading you run the risk of twist in the Y axis rails. This will cause premature wear or possible binding, both issue are not good.

    This info was passed to me from a very knowledgeable Haas Tech sitting in the parking lot of the Haas factory waiting for parts just like me.

    Good luck.

  5. #5
    Janz99 is offline Plastic
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    Sorry guys, maybe I wasn't being as specific as I should have been. The table itself isn't out in the Z plane if you will. Its out in the xy plane. We have a large square granite block that you lay on the table, and dial it along the Y axis. Once its dialled straight in the Y, if you run the dial test along the X, its out .006 on one machine and .003 on another. So the x is out relative to the Y or vice versa.

    We have ran a dial indicator along the top of the table, and its within .0002-.0003".

  6. #6
    machineit2 is offline Cast Iron
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    Is this a granite surface plate that you are putting on the table?

  7. #7
    KenFoulks's Avatar
    KenFoulks is online now Aluminum
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    Post some pictures of your setup. Show how the block is located and how the indicator is held.

    Are you sure the block you are using has perpendicular sides?

  8. #8
    behindpropellers is offline Stainless
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    Default

    Um...

    What I am thinking is that the linear rails are not on perpendicular??

  9. #9
    Janz99 is offline Plastic
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    Quote Originally Posted by behindpropellers View Post
    Um...

    What I am thinking is that the linear rails are not on perpendicular??
    BINGO!!!!

    Yes, the granite block we are using is perfectly square/perpendicular. I'm not sure I would call it a granite plate, its more of a block if you ask me. I'll see if I can take some pictures tonight when I get to work.

    Thanks
    Ryan

  10. #10
    machineit2 is offline Cast Iron
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    Quote Originally Posted by Janz99 View Post
    BINGO!!!!

    Yes, the granite block we are using is perfectly square/perpendicular. I'm not sure I would call it a granite plate, its more of a block if you ask me. I'll see if I can take some pictures tonight when I get to work.

    Thanks
    Ryan
    It's been a week, how about an update.

    Mike

  11. #11
    Janz99 is offline Plastic
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    Not much to update, we still haven't figured out how to square up the rails, but we haven't really had time to deal with it we are so busy. We've been using the machine to do work with large tolerances. If we get it figured out, i'll post up the solution for others.

    Ryan

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