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Thread: Ford 6.7 liter diesel failure

  1. #1
    JHOLLAND1's Avatar
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    Default Ford 6.7 liter diesel failure

    A mechanic at a Ford dealership in Az posts interesting you-tube clips.
    The 6.7 liter Scorpion engine made in Mexico by Ford has a failure pattern
    in the non-waste gated chassis---F 450 and 550.
    Multiple exhaust valve fractures in vehicles with as little as 20,000 miles.

    apparently Ford is redesigning the head

    here are 3 short clips

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eyBlm__puoY&feature=plcp

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6IJG4xcF1mc&feature=plcp

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dcBv6X5Rmas&feature=plcp


    jh

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    this is one of many times I am thankful I never traded off the 2000 F350 with 7.3l. I will say I am impressed with Dad's 2008 dodge withe the 6.7L cummins and 6 speed auto trans. There is not much difference until you tie 20k lbs behind it but the cummins feels twice as good as the dodge grossing over 30k to me. The heavier the trailer the better the cummins feels in comparison.

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    steve-l is offline Hot Rolled
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    Diesel pick-up trucks are expensive to buy and expensive to repair. After owning one for 8 years, I'll never buy anything else. However neither the Ford or the GM diesel engines hold a candle to the Cummins in either performance or durability. This is not just an idle statement. The Cummins 5.9 and 6.7 are industrial rated and are used in a large variety of continuous duty applications. Both the GM and Ford engines are limited duty, automotive engines, hence they are not as reliable in continuous duty, high load use. Buyer beware.
    Steve

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    steve-l is offline Hot Rolled
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    To further my opinion, I don't mean to say that the Dodge HD trucks are better than the GM or Ford models. I don't think they are. In my opinion, the Ford HD truck is the current best, but the Cummins engine and drive train is the best in class. I have owned my Dodge 3500 Dually with 5.9 Cummins since new and it has been the best truck I have ever owned.
    Steve

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    Timw is offline Stainless
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    Ford loves to build it, sell it and let the customer test it! then they either modify it or build something different.
    Everything they build should be labeled "Experimental"!!
    Don't believe me? Just google Ford sparkplugs blowing out. The repair kit that is sold says it covers 1992-2004 Ford 4-6-8-10 cylinder gas engines!

    I saw a show on Speed Channel, Truck U, they were working on a 6.0 Ford diesel. The EGR failed and filled the top of the engine with coolant and left cyl head.
    They cleaned it up, sent ONLY THE LEFT CYL HEAD to the shop and installed a EGR bypass kit. Bet the EPA loves that fix. (any dumb ass knows that you send both heads to the shop, it's called insurance!)
    The clowns didn't show the truck running at the end either, of course they were too busy trying to sell some other crap as usual.

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    Quote Originally Posted by WILLEO6709 View Post
    this is one of many times I am thankful I never traded off the 2000 F350 with 7.3l. I will say I am impressed with Dad's 2008 dodge withe the 6.7L cummins and 6 speed auto trans. There is not much difference until you tie 20k lbs behind it but the cummins feels twice as good as the dodge grossing over 30k to me. The heavier the trailer the better the cummins feels in comparison.
    I read that the Cummins 5.9L is preferred over the 6.7L due to added emissions stuff on the later, resulting in lower mpg. Memory is a bit hazy but I recal Milacron preferred the 5.9L over the 6.7L when buying his Ram 3500.

    Quote Originally Posted by steve-l View Post
    Diesel pick-up trucks are expensive to buy and expensive to repair. After owning one for 8 years, I'll never buy anything else. However neither the Ford or the GM diesel engines hold a candle to the Cummins in either performance or durability. This is not just an idle statement. The Cummins 5.9 and 6.7 are industrial rated and are used in a large variety of continuous duty applications. Both the GM and Ford engines are limited duty, automotive engines, hence they are not as reliable in continuous duty, high load use. Buyer beware.
    Steve
    Yeah, thats why I've been wanting a Dodge 3500 over a Ford or Chevy. The Cummins was designed as an industrial duty engine from the get go while the other 2 were designed for consumer use. Which is why the other 2 are more compact (shorter block height) and lighter, plus I think a straight 6 design is preferred for commerical apps?
    ihbuilder likes this.

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    Timw is offline Stainless
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    Quote Originally Posted by steve-l View Post
    Diesel pick-up trucks are expensive to buy and expensive to repair. After owning one for 8 years, I'll never buy anything else. However neither the Ford or the GM diesel engines hold a candle to the Cummins in either performance or durability. This is not just an idle statement. The Cummins 5.9 and 6.7 are industrial rated and are used in a large variety of continuous duty applications. Both the GM and Ford engines are limited duty, automotive engines, hence they are not as reliable in continuous duty, high load use. Buyer beware.
    Steve
    There was a problem with the 5.9 engine blocks, I think it was back in the 90's and IIRC they were made in Brazil or other S A country. I have seen discussions about it on RV forums/diesel pushers but I didn't pay too much attention to it.

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    77ironhead is offline Titanium
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    Quote Originally Posted by steve-l View Post
    Diesel pick-up trucks are expensive to buy and expensive to repair. After owning one for 8 years, I'll never buy anything else. However neither the Ford or the GM diesel engines hold a candle to the Cummins in either performance or durability. This is not just an idle statement. The Cummins 5.9 and 6.7 are industrial rated and are used in a large variety of continuous duty applications. Both the GM and Ford engines are limited duty, automotive engines, hence they are not as reliable in continuous duty, high load use. Buyer beware.
    Steve


    here's a novel concept- try and Google before you make sweeping, blanket statements like that one! I sincerely doubt Navistar 18' to 28' box trucks are 'limited duty' or even vaguely 'automotive'. Similarly, I doubt that thousands and thousands of them would have been produced, sold, and used out on the road in 'continuous duty, high road use' applications (not to mention the thousands more in school buses) if they were unreliable.

    Where most of the problems came in was when they became trendy and affordable for consumer purchase, and every shade-tree hack who once upon a time slapped a 4-barrel carb on his shitbox 'hotrod' went out and bought a diesel, threw a Bullydog chip on it, didn't maintain it properly, and wanted to rev it into the stratosphere every time they left the line.

    One basic rule of life applies: if you use something for other than it's intended purpose, chances are it will break.

    beyond that, in the world of 'go fast', going faster also means things will wear out and/or break faster. The occurances will happen on a faster interval, as well.

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    thermite is offline Diamond
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    Quote Originally Posted by Timw View Post
    Ford loves to build it, sell it and let the customer test it! then they either modify it or build something different.
    Everything they build should be labeled "Experimental"!!
    But they DO. Look at the acronym:

    Fix
    Or
    Replace
    Daily

    That said, my '52 'Customline' flathead was the most economical car to purchase and operate for 12-months of use of any vehicle I've have ever owned.

    $90 used @ 113,000 miles
    $9 for an emergency brake cable
    $35 for a pair of Gulf 'Pacer' tires

    .. coupla cases of PX-priced straight 'STP' that it used instead of the conventional 50W motor oil. Which it otherwise used at such a rate as to eject from the exhaust pipe in still-sealed quart cans.

    Oil-cooled muffler never offered to rust though.

    Never once quit on me, and was sold for $75 12 months on.

    'Old Ford's and a natural stone..'

    Sure wish I could have matched THAT math every year since.

    Bill
    Walter A likes this.

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    Hello Guys,

    I just purchased a crew cab 2012 Dodge 2500HD with Cummins 6.7.

    This is the last year before urea tank will used on all future models.

    They are having a problem with bad run of o2 sensors mine has been replaced since owning the truck less than 2 weeks.

    According to service guy at my local dodge dealership cummins is keeping very close eye on what repairs are done to 6.7 motors.

    Service guy says anytime anything is done to cummins motor there is lots of paper work to cummins.

    There is way to much smog BS on new motors to get the benifits of having a diesel.

    The DPF (diesel particulate filter) is a real gem of technology, when to much soot is in the filter which is in the exhaust it puts the truck

    into regeneration mode. When the truck is in regen mode it makes a lot less HP.

    What this does is to put extra fuel into DPF and burn the soot out of the filter as by product of this it puts unburned dirty fuel into crankcase of motor.

    This cannot be very good for the motor.

    According to dodge oil gets changed every 7500 miles or sooner when the sensor tells you change the oil. HAHA

    I have 100,000 mile warranty with extended bumper to bumper warranty, time will tell.

    Guys are removing all this smog BS with different delete kits available as after market parts.

    They claim big gains in mileage and power without all the BS.

    My whole stable is now all Diesel to get away from ethanol being shoved down our throats and the problems it creates with motors.

    Huster 72" zero turn lawn mower with 28hp kubota diesel

    1986 International 254 4x4 Tractor mitsubishi 28 HP Diesel

    1984 Mercedes 190D 2.2 liter Diesel 32mpg city 42 hwy.

    2012 VW TDI Jetta for my wife 42 average combined driving

    2012 Dodge 2500 HD 6.7 cummins

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    I have several friends with 6.0 and 6.4 power stroke fords that had motor and transmission problems with less than

    50,000 miles on the clock.

    I found this about the new 6.7 motors and complaints about it.

    Fords new motor is built in Mexico,"It has been in development for four years. It will be built in Chihuahua, Mexico."

    Ford tries to quiet complaints about diesel engines with new 6.7-liter Power Stroke V8 - Autoweek

    The diesels that we do have here in USA are so choked up with smog bs they are causing lots of problems with our diesels.

    Other countries do not share in all our diesel problems, and its hard to find a car in Europe thats not a Diesel.

    Diesel fuel is cheaper to make than the 8 blends of gasoline that they make,however many octane levels,winter blends,summer blends, California blend.

    If they would stop all these blends and make 1 midgrade blend without ethanol gas would drop by $2.00 a gallon over night and mpgs would go up.

    Switching USA autos/trucks to diesel would help our country with oil independence since most diesels get better mpg than there gas equals.

    Our EPA has to much control. They sure swept the latest scandal about the refinery by passing their smog filters under the carpet.

    Nation's 2nd largest petroleum refinery violates Clean Air Act, fined $5.3m

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    JHOLLAND1's Avatar
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    so what is cost of replacement 6.7 Scorpion engine , installed

    truck owner and blogger--ruschejj--on Ford Motor Co website-- experienced engine failure in his 2011 F250 with 122,000 on 6.7.
    cause--loss of exhaust valve head, cylinder 8.
    FoMoCo authorized Ford of Ocala $26,000 credit to replace engine. this dealership actually billed FoMoCo $23,095.67

    jh

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    kustomizingkid is online now Stainless
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    Ford messed up way back when... if they had gotten the Cummins they would have owned both the light and medium duty truck market. On the other hand I just did some work on a 99 7.3 with 410k on the clock, and its ready for another few hundred thousand miles.

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    robmc is offline Cast Iron
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    Quote Originally Posted by steve-l View Post
    Diesel pick-up trucks are expensive to buy and expensive to repair. After owning one for 8 years, I'll never buy anything else. However neither the Ford or the GM diesel engines hold a candle to the Cummins in either performance or durability. This is not just an idle statement. The Cummins 5.9 and 6.7 are industrial rated and are used in a large variety of continuous duty applications. Both the GM and Ford engines are limited duty, automotive engines, hence they are not as reliable in continuous duty, high load use. Buyer beware.
    Steve
    I like the Cummins engines but those Power stroke diesels were originally International truck engines years ago and GM started to use Allison trans years ago. I ran 5.9 in brush chippers and other equipment but be careful when you make blanket statements that may not be factually correct.

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    greenbuggy is offline Hot Rolled
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    Quote Originally Posted by 77ironhead View Post


    here's a novel concept- try and Google before you make sweeping, blanket statements like that one! I sincerely doubt Navistar 18' to 28' box trucks are 'limited duty' or even vaguely 'automotive'. Similarly, I doubt that thousands and thousands of them would have been produced, sold, and used out on the road in 'continuous duty, high road use' applications (not to mention the thousands more in school buses) if they were unreliable.
    I can't speak as to the new ones but IH used to put real engines like the DT466 in their straight trucks. If they're putting the same powerstroke engineering abortions that the light duty ford trucks are getting in their straight trucks, I think they will lose market share when people wake up and realize just how awful they are.

    Having replaced more than my fair share of coil packs, plugs and helicoils on Fords gas motors I can say assuredly that they use poor quality alloys and piss poor engineering on trucks which are apparently meant to be thrown away instead of serviced. On the 1997-up trucks its faster to lift the cab off the frame to swap motors than try to use the *extremely* limited space ford gives you for routine maintenance, much less big jobs. Doing a motor swap on a 97-up truck is a nightmare with a hoist I don't think I would take one on if I didn't have access to one. Sure seems like giving the shadetree mechanic the middle finger to me.

    Where most of the problems came in was when they became trendy and affordable for consumer purchase, and every shade-tree hack who once upon a time slapped a 4-barrel carb on his shitbox 'hotrod' went out and bought a diesel, threw a Bullydog chip on it, didn't maintain it properly, and wanted to rev it into the stratosphere every time they left the line.

    One basic rule of life applies: if you use something for other than it's intended purpose, chances are it will break.
    I think that might be an oversimplification, but you gotta pay to play certainly applies. Seems like the European diesels from BMW and MB often have more than adequate wiggle room for a little bit more boost or fuel.

    Regardless if I were in a position to buy a new diesel today it would either say MB Bluetec or Cummins on it.

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    Garwood is offline Titanium
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    I've heard nothing but good about the Ford 6.7 up till this. It will be interesting to see how it's handled.

    Hey, the 7.3 wasn't bad, but it is a light duty diesel engine. The fact Navistar sold it for use in millions of buses and Uhaul trucks doesn't make them any better than they are. They have a lot of stupid design issues that make you scratch your head. Makes you wonder "That's your best attempt at a fuel system Navistar? Really!?" The 7.3 was "good enough". The 5.9's are GREAT engines.

    Take all the EGR related issues out of the 6.0 talk and you still have an engine with plastic lifter guides that deteriorate, allow the roller lifters to rotate until they come apart dispersing the tip bearing rollers into the pan where they fit through the oil pump pickup screen, pass through the oil pump wrecking the engine. All while you won't hear or otherwise tell a bit of difference until it's shutoff and the engine won't restart from it's fantastic oil pressure integrated fuel system.

    Navistar can build good engines too. The DT360 and DT466 are pretty nice.

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    Spud's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by robmc View Post
    I like the Cummins engines but those Power stroke diesels were originally International truck engines years ago and GM started to use Allison trans years ago. I ran 5.9 in brush chippers and other equipment but be careful when you make blanket statements that may not be factually correct.
    When people pointed out the industrial duty nature of Cummins vs. the consumer nature of the Ford and Chevy, I assumed they meant the Duramax and the Ford 6.7L .

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    legendboy is offline Cast Iron
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    happy 05 duramax owner here

    not a single complaint

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    I have both a 2003 Dodge 3500 with a 5.9 cummins, and 2011 2500 6.7 Cummins. Previously, had a 2000, and 2002 Ford both with the 7.3 Powerstroke.
    Never had a single issue with either engine.
    The powerstrokes were all stock. I towed almost every day, never a problem.
    The 2003 Cummins has 60hp injectors, programmer, ATS Turbo, head studs, intake, etc. We still use it to tow every day, 200,000 miles, never a problem.
    The 2011 was a dog compared to the stock 5.9, I wanted to get rid of it the day I got it. My first tank of fuel I got 380 miles out of 32 gallons. At 600 Miles, did the DPF Delete, programmer, and it was a night and day difference. Well over 600 miles to a tank, huge huge difference in the power. Now have 20,000 on it, not a single problem yet. The mechanics say they regularly see these trucks coming in with DPF Issues. Although I have heard on some forums that the 6.7 Cummins is blowing head gaskets on the new engines when used for heavy towing.

    Anyway, a good friend of mine is a top Ford diesel mechanic. And he drives a Ford with a 7.3 in it. One of our guys here has one with the 6.0, and so does a friend of mine. Both needed head gaskets at just over 100,000 miles. It is well known that if you have a 6.0, you need head gaskets and put head studs in. Ford told them both that they would not help at all. One was literally 100 miles over and still within a month of the 5 year warranty, they would not help at all.

    But he says yes the reason heads are going is because of the emissions. I agree that an engine should put out as little as possible. But they are pushing them too fast, they need time to figure it out.

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