OT: A Cashless Society? - Page 6
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 6 of 7 FirstFirst ... 4567 LastLast
Results 101 to 120 of 122
  1. #101
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Country
    FINLAND
    Posts
    966
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    239
    Likes (Received)
    462

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SeaMoss View Post
    You need an explanation to take your own money out of the bank ?

    That's what I find appalling about this cashless stuff.
    Yup, all the American money laundering and Terrorist-Terror has arrived here too.
    You could be sending it to Al-Qaida after all.

  2. #102
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    10,377
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    5843
    Likes (Received)
    4578

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ries View Post
    In the USA, you have had any cash bank transaction over $10,000 reported to the feds since 1986. About 40% of americans were born since then, and have never known or imagined any other situation.
    $5,000 IIRC. Cash or EFT. Ten is an extra trigger, listed as trans-border.

    But - wait for it.. the Banks figured out rather a long time ago they could save money by just copying Treasury ALL transactions and letting the Gov use its OWN 'puters and staff to mine that haystack for needles.

    IOW - you've NO idea if they have bothered to go outside their stated numbers or not.

    The miscreants as make the news indicate some folks surely are being looked at, and it may have been software overwatching EVERYONE as first flagged them.

    Recently got some sharpish attention meself for unusual activity due to an inheritance, and it was a rather small one and moved in smaller yet amounts at that.

  3. Likes digger doug liked this post
  4. #103
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Eastern Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    3,799
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3546
    Likes (Received)
    3364

    Default

    My original question when starting this thread was not about $10,000 transactions but instead if people still do some smaller purchases with cash. The idea that everyone who uses some cash is part of the underground economy is absurd. I use checks, transfers, credit cards etc. for larger things but if I'm buying a cup of coffee and a muffin it's usually paid for in cash. That might label me as old fashioned but I've got lots of company around here. I've been at many outdoor events where food vendors only accept cash and at that level I hope it never disappears completely.

    It's nice to have choice and those who advocate limiting the choices of others always smacks a bit of elitism.

  5. #104
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    10,377
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    5843
    Likes (Received)
    4578

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Scottl View Post
    My original question when starting this thread was not about $10,000 transactions but instead if people still do some smaller purchases with cash. The idea that everyone who uses some cash is part of the underground economy is absurd. I use checks, transfers, credit cards etc. for larger things but if I'm buying a cup of coffee and a muffin it's usually paid for in cash. That might label me as old fashioned but I've got lots of company around here. I've been at many outdoor events where food vendors only accept cash and at that level I hope it never disappears completely.

    It's nice to have choice and those who advocate limiting the choices of others always smacks a bit of elitism.
    Time was.. I fumed over folk making small purchases with plastic 'stead of cash, and holding up many others at a checkout line. That worm turned a long time ago. 'tronics of one kind or another are now faster than cash - especially where the purchase is under the trip-point that wants a signature.

    Cash, after all, was an artificial invention in its day, too. Beat all hell out of paying in sacks of grain, bushels of turnips, or live chickens.

    If one wants to bemoan vanishing choices, d'you expect to bring those barter deals back into general use, too?



    They haven't ever entirely gone away, after all. Some among us "right here on PM" are still swapping machine parts or metrology gear for cutters and drops, etc.

    Choices survive. Convenience just shifts the balance of majority use.

  6. #105
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Edison Washington USA
    Posts
    10,036
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    824
    Likes (Received)
    4578

    Default

    This varies so much regionally, and by income. Rich people seldom carry coins. I would highly doubt Trump carries a wallet- he doesnt even handle money much, if ever. Whereas poor people often get paid in cash, and cant afford monthly checking account fees, or overdraft charges, and do almost everything in cash. Nowadays, SS and VA payments are direct deposit, but there are still people who go in and pull it all out in cash every month as soon as its deposited.

    My father in law, born in the teens, used to carry a huge wad of cash in his pants pocket at all times- it was a sign that he was successful, just like the Caddy he drove. This was very very common thru at least the 70s. But those guys are mostly gone now, and my kids (his grandkids) often have zero cash on them- everything is debit card. Unless you work in restaurants, and get cash tips, most kids today, you know, that 40% of the population, just dont even think of cash. Nowadays, in big cities, you can pay your parking meter with your phone, you dont use phone booths cause they dont exist, and the idea that you would NEED change, metal coins, is just bizarre to pretty much anyone under 30.

    And, like Matti from Finland, many of the industrial suppliers I use plain refuse to take cash- they want you to have an account. If I want a decent drill bit, or a truckload of stainless, I get an account, and usually pay online.

    These things will change, with time, as one generation dies and the next one comes of age, just like many other things have changed.

  7. Likes Meggab liked this post
  8. #106
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Denver, CO USA
    Posts
    10,455
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    38
    Likes (Received)
    4450

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Monarchist View Post
    Time was.. I fumed over folk making small purchases with plastic 'stead of cash, and holding up many others at a checkout line. That worm turned a long time ago. 'tronics of one kind or another are now faster than cash - especially where the purchase is under the trip-point that wants a signature.

    Cash, after all, was an artificial invention in its day, too. Beat all hell out of paying in sacks of grain, bushels of turnips, or live chickens.

    If one wants to bemoan vanishing choices, d'you expect to bring those barter deals back into general use, too?

    They haven't ever entirely gone away, after all. Some among us "right here on PM" are still swapping machine parts or metrology gear for cutters and drops, etc.

    I got behind a lady writing a check for 100 over at the grocery yesterday.

  9. #107
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Eastern Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    3,799
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3546
    Likes (Received)
    3364

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Monarchist View Post
    Time was.. I fumed over folk making small purchases with plastic 'stead of cash, and holding up many others at a checkout line. That worm turned a long time ago. 'tronics of one kind or another are now faster than cash - especially where the purchase is under the trip-point that wants a signature.

    Cash, after all, was an artificial invention in its day, too. Beat all hell out of paying in sacks of grain, bushels of turnips, or live chickens.

    If one wants to bemoan vanishing choices, d'you expect to bring those barter deals back into general use, too?



    They haven't ever entirely gone away, after all. Some among us "right here on PM" are still swapping machine parts or metrology gear for cutters and drops, etc.

    Choices survive. Convenience just shifts the balance of majority use.
    Ask the people in Puerto Rico what a cashless society would be like!

    Many down there who were in the habit of using plastic got a rude shock after the hurricane when the supporting infrastructure was largely destroyed. The few ATMs that were still functional ran out of cash quickly and in many areas the power grid and networks were (and in some cases still are) down for months, making cash and barter the only way to get food and other necessities.

    The convenience of modern life and technology is wonderful until suddenly it ain't there. Puerto Rico is the example closest to home but many portions of the world have suffered from similar situations during war and natural disasters in recent decades. It CAN happen anywhere and when it does it comes as a real shock to those who got too comfortable with "easy".

  10. #108
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Denver, CO USA
    Posts
    10,455
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    38
    Likes (Received)
    4450

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Monarchist View Post
    Time was.. I fumed over folk making small purchases with plastic 'stead of cash, and holding up many others at a checkout line. That worm turned a long time ago. 'tronics of one kind or another are now faster than cash - especially where the purchase is under the trip-point that wants a signature.

    Cash, after all, was an artificial invention in its day, too. Beat all hell out of paying in sacks of grain, bushels of turnips, or live chickens.

    If one wants to bemoan vanishing choices, d'you expect to bring those barter deals back into general use, too?

    They haven't ever entirely gone away, after all. Some among us "right here on PM" are still swapping machine parts or metrology gear for cutters and drops, etc.

    I got behind a lady writing a check for 100 over at the grocery yesterday.

  11. #109
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Norfolk England
    Posts
    1,574
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1526
    Likes (Received)
    1008

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Miguels244 View Post
    I got behind a lady writing a check for 100 over at the grocery yesterday.
    What,twice?Not the same woman I hope.

  12. Likes bucktruck, Monarchist liked this post
  13. #110
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Denver, CO USA
    Posts
    10,455
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    38
    Likes (Received)
    4450

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by camscan View Post
    What,twice?Not the same woman I hope.
    I guess she needed two hundred.

  14. Likes Monarchist liked this post
  15. #111
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Country
    CHINA
    Posts
    1,728
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    1017

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ries View Post
    These things will change, with time, as one generation dies and the next one comes of age, just like many other things have changed.
    Yes. We made it past 1984 but it seems like the kids won't

    Quote Originally Posted by Scottl View Post
    Ask the people in Puerto Rico what a cashless society would be like!
    Or Greece ... all this stuff is very fragile. At least when I do a crappy setup, I know it's a crappy setup and I best be ready to run, the part has a good chance of becoming scrap, don't get my hands anywhere near the cutter. People now seem to believe this kind of stuff is sturdy, even when Target mentions that 350,000 customers had all their private data handed over to crooks and thieves.

  16. #112
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    10,377
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    5843
    Likes (Received)
    4578

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Miguels244 View Post
    I guess she needed two hundred.
    You should have cut her a discount.

  17. Likes camscan liked this post
  18. #113
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Country
    CHINA
    Posts
    1,728
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    1017

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Monarchist View Post
    You should have cut her a discount.
    That's called sexual harassment now.

    Only in this case, it'd be kinda funny.

  19. #114
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Norfolk England
    Posts
    1,574
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1526
    Likes (Received)
    1008

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SeaMoss View Post
    That's called sexual harassment now.

    Only in this case, it'd be kinda funny.
    I like that.

  20. #115
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Country
    FINLAND
    Posts
    966
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    239
    Likes (Received)
    462

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Scottl View Post
    Ask the people in Puerto Rico what a cashless society would be like!

    Many down there who were in the habit of using plastic got a rude shock after the hurricane when the supporting infrastructure was largely destroyed. The few ATMs that were still functional ran out of cash quickly and in many areas the power grid and networks were (and in some cases still are) down for months, making cash and barter the only way to get food and other necessities.

    The convenience of modern life and technology is wonderful until suddenly it ain't there. Puerto Rico is the example closest to home but many portions of the world have suffered from similar situations during war and natural disasters in recent decades. It CAN happen anywhere and when it does it comes as a real shock to those who got too comfortable with "easy".
    Paper money is bit better in catastrophes but if the shit really hits the fan you better keep your basement filled with gold, potatoes and booze.
    Paper money didn't help much these kids:


    Wasn't much good in Zimbabwe either when DAILY inflation rate was close to 100%

  21. #116
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Australia (Hobart)
    Posts
    3,056
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    421
    Likes (Received)
    2059

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MattiJ View Post
    Paper money is bit better in catastrophes but if the shit really hits the fan you better keep your basement filled with gold, potatoes and booze.
    Don't forget the bricks of 22LR ammo. I'd skip the gold myself and have good machine and other tools (especially welding gear & consumables) plus the infrastructure to run them. If you've got gold and I've got tools plus the ability to use them, what are you going to trade me when something you need breaks?

    PDW

  22. #117
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Woodland Hills, Ca. and some times Hutchinson, Ks.
    Posts
    2,099
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4
    Likes (Received)
    429

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by PDW View Post
    Don't forget the bricks of 22LR ammo. I'd skip the gold myself and have good machine and other tools (especially welding gear & consumables) plus the infrastructure to run them. If you've got gold and I've got tools plus the ability to use them, what are you going to trade me when something you need breaks?

    PDW
    That may be OK for the, end of the world as we know it. For more mundane things like earthquakes, fires, floods etc, having a few weeks of food, water, fuel and, some cash works well.

    The worst disasters we face today outside of armed conflict are natural disasters, we have seen some "epic" ones of late. The fires in California left people with little to nothing of their former lives. The folks in Texas and Louisiana nearly the same. Some people have bail out bags or other emergency kits, then there are the completely clueless.

    The reality of most disasters is they are regional at best. Having cash may be helpful in the aftermath in that zone, once outside that devastation life remains pretty normal. Personally I have a camper that is fully stocked and ready to go with food, fuel, clothes, tools etc. After the Northridge earthquake in 1994 I realized that you need to be self reliant for a few weeks in a major natural disaster. The camper also allows you to get to a better place or out of harms way with the essentials of daily life.

    How much cash do you folks have on hand for an emergency? I try to keep 1000 on hand, that is enough to deal with most contingencies while, minimizing potential losses.

    Steve

  23. Likes Monarchist, Scottl liked this post
  24. #118
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Australia (Hobart)
    Posts
    3,056
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    421
    Likes (Received)
    2059

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve in SoCal View Post
    That may be OK for the, end of the world as we know it. For more mundane things like earthquakes, fires, floods etc, having a few weeks of food, water, fuel and, some cash works well.
    Ah right, I pretty much already have that covered in normal lifestyle - I have my own water supply, sewage, a reasonable fuel supply and a fair amount of food on hand anyway. Plus I can shoot & eat the plentiful wildlife. When the boat is out of the shed and sitting on its mooring out the front of my house I've got offroad transport covered too, if I have to vacate. Bush fire is my most likely natural disaster and I'm reasonably prepared. I know I can't take my big tools & extensive book collection so if it comes to it I'm (metaphorically) walking away with a backpack.

    I don't keep much cash on hand, usually $200 or so.

    PDW

  25. #119
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Eastern Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    3,799
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3546
    Likes (Received)
    3364

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MattiJ View Post
    Paper money is bit better in catastrophes but if the shit really hits the fan you better keep your basement filled with gold, potatoes and booze.
    Paper money didn't help much these kids:

    Wasn't much good in Zimbabwe either when DAILY inflation rate was close to 100%
    And if you re-read my posts I was never talking about EOTWAWKI scenarios or hyper-inflation (which is easy for governments using fiat money whether in cash or strictly electronic form). A cashless society provides ZERO protection against hyper-inflation.

    What I said was that physical money still had value in modern society, especially during periods where infrastructure such as electrical power and communication networks becomes severely damaged by catastrophe.

    Likewise, a "basement filled with gold, potatoes and booze" is only worthwhile if you can defend it against predators, and in an end of the world scenario average people would likely be overwhelmed by such predators, many of whom would be career criminals and veterans of the prison system.

    PS: In a barter economy things like butane lighters, cheap LED flashlights, and numerous other small items such as wet wipes and lens cleaners in packets, facial tissues in packets, and other inexpensive pocket sized items would be the small change of a non-cash economy.

  26. #120
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    erie,pa
    Posts
    8,961
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    16006
    Likes (Received)
    4543

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by camscan View Post
    What,twice?Not the same woman I hope.
    Live reporting....he's still in line.


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •