slightly OT tesla battery is switched on in South Australia , mains power
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  1. #1
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    Default slightly OT tesla battery is switched on in South Australia , mains power


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    while a substantial achievement, I think its safe to say this was a billionaire's vanity project, Musk having made a personal bet on it.

    wether it is actually economically practical is another matter. how much did the batteries actually cost? how long will it take for the "baseline capacity" provided by the storage to pay that back? remember this is storage only not generation.

    I also wonder how much of the battery production was diverted to make the deadline? is a shortage of batteries holding up model 3 production? hmm..

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    A bit of backstory is the SA government went on the usual trendy renewable energy splurge at the expense of fossil fuel generated electricity.

    They were also luckily connected to other states via transmission lines to cater for any shortfall of electricity.

    A storm came along and the transmission line got blown over, so the state was cut off and had to rely on their own electricity generation needs. Ironically the wind farms were turned off due to too much wind, so the state had a electricity crisis as a gas generating plant also failed at the same time.

    So part of the solution was apparently this huge battery that the state government had to buy.

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    Unfortunately for the Lithium Ion folks, lead acid is still way more bang for the buck, but Tesla is out there promoting their solution, which comes with more forward looking switching/management options. There's no one in the lead acid industry willing to do that.

    'Tain't a bad idea to look into storage for renewable generation. Mostly it's unnecessary, but the naysayers are so hung up on the "sun don't shine at night" argument that it's necessary to advance the industry and calm fears.

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    I wonder what the LOTO procedure is for working on that thing.....

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    Quote Originally Posted by RC99 View Post
    A bit of backstory is the SA government went on the usual trendy renewable energy splurge at the expense of fossil fuel generated electricity.

    They were also luckily connected to other states via transmission lines to cater for any shortfall of electricity.

    A storm came along and the transmission line got blown over, so the state was cut off and had to rely on their own electricity generation needs. Ironically the wind farms were turned off due to too much wind, so the state had a electricity crisis as a gas generating plant also failed at the same time.

    So part of the solution was apparently this huge battery that the state government had to buy.
    You never want to let the realities of engineering get in the way of politics.....

    PDW

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    ....Touché

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    The naysayers are out (I resemble that accusation), but politics and emotions usually trump engineering.

    Brownouts/blackouts in a hot place like SA during peak AC season can get people riled up, not to mention the health dangers for the old and infirm.

    A bit of backstory is the SA government went on the usual trendy renewable energy splurge at the expense of fossil fuel generated electricity.
    Do you think the market should rule?

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    Quote Originally Posted by neilho View Post
    The naysayers are out (I resemble that accusation), but politics and emotions usually trump engineering.

    Brownouts/blackouts in a hot place like SA during peak AC season can get people riled up, not to mention the health dangers for the old and infirm.



    Do you think the market should rule?
    You think that’s awful?
    Look at how the USA treated it’s brown Spanish speaking citizens on the island of Puerto Rico after the hurricane Maria.
    There are still large parts of the island without power.

    Bonus points.
    Contracts went to unqualified friends of our current administration.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Miguels244 View Post
    You think that’s awful?.....
    No, not at all. I'm in favor of renewables and battery banks and have been working in renewables (mostly wind) for 35 years.

    My first post was to the effect that li-ion banks are more expensive than lead acid for a stationary application, but that the lead acid industry isn't willing to take the risks/do the engineering that Tesla did that was necessary.

    And further, that better grid management would obviate at least some of the need for large storage, but that renewables are a highly emotional subject, with many engineers pooh-poohing renewables because "the sun don't shine at night". More sophisticated analysis and some experience results in a more nuanced view, but the emotional, more reactional views are out there and have influence, so have to be dealt with. Battery banks are one way to do that.

    That was my primary point.

    The followup question (do you think the market should rule?) was for the poster who characterized renewables as trendy. There seems to be two camps of thought, on opposing sides of the climate change divide. One thinks we should invest money in renewables, the other thinks that we should just be buying the cheapest power available and that climate change/CO2 production should not be a factor in that decision.

    What happened/is happening in PR is unconscionable. Competent administration with the financial wherewithal to fix the system should be in place, and isn't. Maybe it has to do with skin color, but I suspect it has more to do with PR not having any representation. And cronyism.


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