Did they used to way under-rate forklifts? No way this is only 8K... - Page 3
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  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scottl View Post
    I know several people who have either tractors or loaders who also use forks on occasion. While they are certainly more difficult to use because you must constantly adjust tilt to compensate for changes in elevation, people have moved machinery and other precious objects with them. It just requires more caution and a skilled operator.
    I'm hoping part of the "skill" of which you speak is the sense to have the machines on the forks such that it is very difficult for them to come off the forks. Techniques include machine base on plywood or rubber strips and temporarily C clamped to the forks... or strapped to a heavy duty pallet.

  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Milacron View Post
    I'm hoping part of the "skill" of which you speak is the sense to have the machines on the forks such that it is very difficult for them to come off the forks. Techniques include machine base on plywood or rubber strips and temporarily C clamped to the forks... or strapped to a heavy duty pallet.
    Certainly any of those plus a strap around the bucket to prevent sliding. In the case of telehandlers the work is usually palletized. When the truck delivers it to the site a "trailer wart" offloads it and sets it down, then the telehandler lifts it up to upper levels as needed.

    The main point I was trying to make is that while if you are routinely moving material, especially over flat surfaces a lift truck is the wisest buy but if your main activity is digging or moving loose material something with a bucket and some accessory forks will sub for a lift truck for occasional use. Around here a lot of the contractors have loaders with quick release attachments and they bring a fork carriage to the site to be switched over when needed. Many of the modern loaders have side handle joystick control and its pretty easy to adjust tilt at the same time as raising or lowering. I grew up on old style hydraulic levers and the first time I tried modern controls I was amazed at the ease with which a load can be controlled.

  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Milacron View Post
    I'm hoping part of the "skill" of which you speak is the sense to have the machines on the forks such that it is very difficult for them to come off the forks.
    Given that the load was foodstuffs, and we LIKED to eat, ELSE ordnance (rockets, grenades, cannon shells, landmines, etc) or - in our case loose Oxy or Acetylene cylinders or two TONS of LOX in cryotainers?

    Yes.

    One doesn't need a lot more than that in the way of "external motivation" to want to learn to be cautious!



    On the "modern controls".. Delightful! First time I rented a 12K trackhoe I had to ask where my footpedals had gone. They were still where expected, but had flip-covers over them!

    Everything had been moved to a joystick that is operated with ONE hand, not both feet and BOTH hands. Practically play a game of cards with the bucket on those new ones..


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