Hyster H400A 40,000 Lb Forklift - Page 2
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 39 of 39
  1. #21
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    South Central PA
    Posts
    12,170
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1361
    Likes (Received)
    2439

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dkmc View Post
    Yes, yes, & yes.

    Moving the forks is a major PITA. I use 2x6's to pry, and a 4000lb Yale with chains to push or drag them if needed.
    Any machine in this size class should come standard with
    Fork Positioning.
    If it was my machine, it would have some sort of positioning cylinders on it, and a camera or 2 to see the forks with, as
    they are cheap enough these days.
    This is the machine I posted above - there's a bar with holes across the carriage, and a handy bar in a pocket right behind the carriage. You can stick the bar in a hole and easily pry the forks to where you need them. Don't know why this isn't more common on big lifts, or even if it came that way or was added by the owner.

    My 5K lift has positioning and side shift - I'm now ruined for ever owning one without positioning.
    dsc07201b.jpg

  2. Likes dkmc, Bobw, digger doug liked this post
  3. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Upstate NY -In the Flats next to the corn fields
    Posts
    8,606
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1259
    Likes (Received)
    2075

    Default

    That is so stupidly simple it makes me want to add one to the neighbors
    machine!

    They won't care about it because they use it with a lifting frame and never move the forks around.

    Positioning:
    Same neighbor also has 3 BRAND NEW complete mast carriages with new 5ft forks that are Side Shift and Positioning type.
    Bough them years ago at auction for pennies.
    Never has done anything with them.....

  4. #23
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    556
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    46

    Default

    Thanks for posting that photo of the positioning bar Mud. That is a really clever idea.

  5. #24
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Melbourne Australia
    Posts
    4,907
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    602
    Likes (Received)
    1746

    Default

    This is my favorite fork down here. There's two of them here. (Two different companies)

    img_7733.jpgimg_7738.jpg
    RiggerLift 120. 120,000lbs @ 2ft'. With the counter weights off, they can be trucked around town, on a drop deck trailer with deck ramps. Separate Semi trailer with the counter weights and a service fork.

    Regards Phil.

    (Adding on Edit) It has a 454 Chevy, running LP Gas in it, so it sounds the business also.

  6. Likes Mud, dkmc, wheels17, bryan_machine, david n liked this post
  7. #25
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Near Seattle
    Posts
    4,212
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2135
    Likes (Received)
    965

    Default

    where do they get front tires for that????

  8. #26
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Tucson AZ
    Posts
    5,643
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7430
    Likes (Received)
    2519

    Default

    Can't tell who made it with the circus wagon paint job.

  9. #27
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Melbourne Australia
    Posts
    4,907
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    602
    Likes (Received)
    1746

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tdmidget View Post
    Can't tell who made it with the circus wagon paint job.
    Was he talking to me? Guess the Circus Midget would know what a Circus wagon looks like. Boom, Boom.

    Why do,you want to buy one? $350k will get you this. MachineryTrader.com | 28 RIGGER LIFT R12 For Sale

    Rigger Xtreme was the builder. Ontario, Canada. Moot point as they went under late 2008 / early 2009. Google will tell you they went down hard. There's a judgement against them from a lost deposit for a new machine.

    Regards Phil.

    (On Edit).

    That above link is of interest, if you're bored and have 5 minutes to kill.

    1/. It's fully stacked with counter weights. 40,000 lb. Should only be 5, but I think they have added a 6th. We'd never ever do that down here, honest,

    2/. Steel plates under the wheels. You could call these things the dowsing rod of forks. If there's water, sub-sided soil under the concrete, or a storm water drain. That thing will find it.

    3/. Given the fork is in California. From what I could tell from the two useless photo's. Its picking up some long bed plano / column mill. The graphic's on the head look very Fadal. My guess it was the close out, when Fadal, shut up shop in Cali. I'm talking about this picture. Link>> http://media.sandhills.com/img.axd?i...vMOC%2futqQ%3d
    Last edited by machtool; 05-01-2016 at 06:37 AM.

  10. Likes digger doug liked this post
  11. #28
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Melbourne Australia
    Posts
    4,907
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    602
    Likes (Received)
    1746

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dkmc View Post
    That is so stupidly simple it makes me want to add one to the neighbors
    machine!
    Dan, Sorry if this is an offensive question. When you trying to move the fork, are you going full mast tilt forward? That takes all the pressure off the bottom of the mast / heal, and they should hang on the top bar. That thing I posted, the Tynes* (* Yes that's how we spell it, just in case the Midge wants to go off.). They'd be 1,500 pounds each. If the top bar is greased, I can kick them apart with one leg. You have to pick your spot. I've seen blokes try to move them from the tip, they just splay open and lock up on the bar. A lot like trying to press a bearing in on the piss.

    That machine 2 1/2 - 3 foot out from the mast, I can send 1,500 lb's of them sailing from one side to the other, as long as its greased or oiled, and the mast is at full tilt forward. Do fork tines / tynes have an Airy point?

    Regards Phil.
    Last edited by machtool; 05-01-2016 at 05:48 AM.

  12. #29
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Tucson AZ
    Posts
    5,643
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7430
    Likes (Received)
    2519

    Default

    I can see a place fir those solid tires, if you have a suitable surface. Much safer if you have to lift to any real height. But if you need that kind of thing Taylor will build anything you want:
    Taylor Machine Works International - Taylor Machine Works International

  13. #30
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Country
    AUSTRALIA
    Posts
    1
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default Hyster H400A

    Hi, we also have the same forklift that we are currently trying to rebuild, do you have any idea where we can get a workshop manual from?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 15072049.jpg  

  14. #31
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Upstate NY -In the Flats next to the corn fields
    Posts
    8,606
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1259
    Likes (Received)
    2075

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by machtool View Post
    Dan, Sorry if this is an offensive question. When you trying to move the fork, are you going full mast tilt forward? That takes all the pressure off the bottom of the mast / heal, and they should hang on the top bar. That thing I posted, the Tynes* (* Yes that's how we spell it, just in case the Midge wants to go off.). They'd be 1,500 pounds each. If the top bar is greased, I can kick them apart with one leg. You have to pick your spot. I've seen blokes try to move them from the tip, they just splay open and lock up on the bar. A lot like trying to press a bearing in on the piss.

    That machine 2 1/2 - 3 foot out from the mast, I can send 1,500 lb's of them sailing from one side to the other, as long as its greased or oiled, and the mast is at full tilt forward. Do fork tines / tynes have an Airy point?

    Regards Phil.
    Well Phil, I never got notice of your post until today when post #30 from Big Cat triggered an email alert.....go figure how this web site's software does or doesn't work.

    Not offensive in the least, full tilt forward is not the trick. I can't recall just why at the moment,
    but partial tilt forward is the key, as (would be) copious amounts of grease. But it sits outside in the
    weather, and with the usual custom lifting frame installed, no one cares about fork positioning
    but me I guess. I usually spray on some sort of grease/chain lube but it's gone by the time I need the
    machine again. Does not work as good as heavy grease I'm sure.

  15. #32
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Houston TX
    Posts
    3,282
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    15
    Likes (Received)
    1424

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dkmc View Post
    I usually spray on some sort of grease/chain lube but it's gone by the time I need the
    machine again.
    After owning my forklift for, I think a few years now, it's only now that I'm even close to having an all weather area for it work.

    So right there is the problem, get everything moving good then the machine sits for months at a time because it's waiting for dry weather to firm up the ground.

    I've only had to move my forks a few times, and it's something I actively avoid doing. Previous way was to use a come-a-long, pinch bar and lots of four letter words. But that was when I had help, gonna have to figure out a way for skinny little me to do it by myself.

    I've tryed tilting the forks, and it helps, think I need to just find the angle sweet spot and do a better job with the grease.

    In fact, if the weather holds, I'm going to be doing a bunch of rigging with the Hyster this weekend. Got about 60 tons to move I think.

  16. #33
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Woodland Hills, Ca. and some times Hutchinson, Ks.
    Posts
    2,027
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4
    Likes (Received)
    345

    Default

    I use a 2x4 or 2x6 at least 6 feet long, leverage makes all the difference. My biggest chore is moving the forks from inner to outer carriage. Bertha has a short bar on either side that has two positions, there are vertical bars that bisect the fork travel. I have to lower the forks, pull the bars, back up and side shift the carriage.

    Steve

  17. #34
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Country
    CANADA
    State/Province
    British Columbia
    Posts
    959
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    930
    Likes (Received)
    548

    Default

    Does it have space to rig up two hydraulic cylinders to move the forks?
    You can pick up some skinny cylinders, a high volume hand pump and a directional valve from Harbor freight dirt cheap.

    It might take a bit of thinking to attach it to the forks in a way that you can still tilt them a fair bit, but its doable.

  18. #35
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Country
    AUSTRALIA
    Posts
    365
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    159
    Likes (Received)
    113

    Default

    i just picked up a little baby compared to all of those.

    H4.0 with a 4.3l vortec v6 on lpg
    20170319_104350.jpg

  19. #36
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    556
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    46

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Big Cat View Post
    Hi, we also have the same forklift that we are currently trying to rebuild, do you have any idea where we can get a workshop manual from?
    Hi Big Cat,

    There are workshop manuals available on Ebay, but to be honest, the one I got was practically useless. About 90% of the manual covers servicing a continental gasoline engine which my lift does not have and the rest of the manual is how to service the stuff that never needs fixing. There is nothing in the manual regarding rebuilding the hydraulic cylinders, pump, valves etc. Nothing on the brakes, axle, or transmission. Nothing on rebuilding the steering axle.

    Also, the fluid capacities are mostly wrong.

    What do you need to know?

  20. #37
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    California
    Posts
    244
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    5
    Likes (Received)
    11

    Default

    All of our forklifts live outside so grease on the forks just collects dirt and sand and then disappears. What works really well is to completely clean(steam if you have it) the crowd and the forks and apply powdered graphite mixed with acetone or lacquer thinner to all the sliding surfaces. Build up as many coats as you have time for and reapply as needed in the future.
    Last edited by William Ward; 03-22-2017 at 03:14 PM. Reason: added info

  21. Likes Peter from Holland liked this post
  22. #38
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Upstate NY -In the Flats next to the corn fields
    Posts
    8,606
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1259
    Likes (Received)
    2075

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by William Ward View Post
    All of our forklifts live outside so grease on the forks just collects dirt and sand and then disappears. What works really well is to completely clean(steam if you have it) the crowd and the forks and apply powdered graphite mixed with acetone or lacquer thinner to all the sliding surfaces. Build up as many coats as you have time for and reapply as needed in the future.
    The only problem I see with that, (similar to Never Seize) is that the guy that has to get within 2-3 feet of that stuff is going to magically end up with most of it transferred onto his clothes.


    Plus when you do slide the forks, those "many coats" will peel off on the ground to be tracked inside and all over on peoples shoes.

  23. #39
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Tennessee
    Posts
    251
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    49
    Likes (Received)
    129

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dkmc View Post
    The only problem I see with that, (similar to Never Seize) is that the guy that has to get within 2-3 feet of that stuff is going to magically end up with most of it transferred onto his clothes.


    Plus when you do slide the forks, those "many coats" will peel off on the ground to be tracked inside and all over on peoples shoes.
    Yea, it's nasty, but if you don't keep it lubed up with something, you're going to have a hard time moving them when needed.

    Just wear gloves and take your shoes off when you go in the house. This is nasty work, however you look at it.


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •