Obsolete Trailer Wheels? - Page 2
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 29 of 29
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    9,573
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    16676
    Likes (Received)
    4881

    Default

    Those axles are so cheaply made, I recall reading somewhere, that the tube itself
    was a wee bit thinner, special made thickness, just for the MH axles makers.

    I torched apart an old MF (the building was long demoed, and this was half in the dirt. The springs were single thick leaf, not very safe in case of a crack.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Tennessee
    Posts
    298
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    50
    Likes (Received)
    158

    Default

    Dayton type wheels aren't illegal, you can still order them new on class 8 trucks. Lots of people with dump trucks and heavy haul trucks still prefer the Dayton hub, as they are stronger than a Budd hub/wheel combo.

    As for house trailer axles, I'd think they would be legal as long as the tires were DOT rated. I know the only local mobile home outfit around here will take the axles out from under any mobile home they install, they then return the axles, wheels, and tires back to the factory to put back under a new home. They always have a pile in the corner of the lot but I haven't looked at them close. You'd think they would be pretty good if they ship them back to the factory to be reused.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    9,573
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    16676
    Likes (Received)
    4881

    Default

    Thinking, and getting an inspection sticker on a trailer every year
    are qty (2) different things.....

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Seattle,Wa
    Posts
    755
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    21
    Likes (Received)
    30

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by m16ty View Post
    Dayton type wheels aren't illegal, you can still order them new on class 8 trucks. Lots of people with dump trucks and heavy haul trucks still prefer the Dayton hub, as they are stronger than a Budd hub/wheel combo.

    As for house trailer axles, I'd think they would be legal as long as the tires were DOT rated. I know the only local mobile home outfit around here will take the axles out from under any mobile home they install, they then return the axles, wheels, and tires back to the factory to put back under a new home. They always have a pile in the corner of the lot but I haven't looked at them close. You'd think they would be pretty good if they ship them back to the factory to be reused.
    Maybe different regional nomenclature or I’ve just always been wrong but in the day we called bolt hole rims similar to but not interchangeable with Budds
    “Daytons” and 3 piece clamp-on-stud split rims like on MH or older container chassis “California Rims”. They are still all over the roads in US but I can’t imagine anyone spec’ing them on a drive axle for any truck. Also don’t understand wanting tube tires anymore and thats what you get with split rims.

    A quick look up close under a house trailer will reveal how flimsy many of the
    frames, axles, and crappy suspensions are.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    southern il
    Posts
    551
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    78
    Likes (Received)
    188

    Default

    I saw a set of wheels on MH style axles one time, they had a heavy band of steel around the inside diameter of the wheel (probably 1/2 inch thick), it had the five bolt holes in it that allowed it to seat on the hub without the clamps................sure would make things easier.
    I worked on Dayton style wheels for most of my working life, so lining them up was no real problem.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    new plymouth id
    Posts
    261
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    22
    Likes (Received)
    69

    Default

    here is brand new DOT approved 14.5s 1 NEW 8-14.5 Tow-Master LPT Bias Trailer Tire 8x14.5 8 14.5 14 ply Load Range G | eBay
    they are still in use around here but mostly home built trailer projects. but they get inspected and issued plates. east coast may be different. I didn't like working with them at all. every time dad had a mobile home moved we would make sure there was at least 2 spares and most of the time both would be blown, and we moved a lot of trailer houses.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Peoria, IL
    Posts
    10,981
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    41
    Likes (Received)
    8257

    Default

    I run a trailer with 8X14.5 tires. Never had an issue. Mine are factory Dayton/Fayette axles with bolt on backing plates. I run G rated tires.

    The axles to avoid are the true mobile home axles with welded on backing plates. You cannot replace the brakes. Plus they are usually 10 feet wide and will have been shortened for use on a normal trailer.

    Dayton rims are stronger than other rims for side loads. That's why you often see them on offroad rigs like dump trucks and logging trucks. Plus, the wedges that hold the rims on require pretty light torque, so you can easily change tires in the field. Hub pilot semi truck lug nuts are 450 ft-lbs or more depending on the last hero that rattled them on with the 1" impact.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    southern il
    Posts
    551
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    78
    Likes (Received)
    188

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by idacal View Post
    here is brand new DOT approved 14.5s 1 NEW 8-14.5 Tow-Master LPT Bias Trailer Tire 8x14.5 8 14.5 14 ply Load Range G | eBay
    they are still in use around here but mostly home built trailer projects. but they get inspected and issued plates. east coast may be different. I didn't like working with them at all. every time dad had a mobile home moved we would make sure there was at least 2 spares and most of the time both would be blown, and we moved a lot of trailer houses.
    I hear you talking, if you don't push the weight limits, they don't do too bad.............However,
    If you notice, trailer toters have a full rack of spares behind the cab........that isn't by accident. A good 95 degree day makes them want to hatch out

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Tucson AZ
    Posts
    5,877
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7992
    Likes (Received)
    2685

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jmead View Post
    Maybe different regional nomenclature or I’ve just always been wrong but in the day we called bolt hole rims similar to but not interchangeable with Budds
    “Daytons” and 3 piece clamp-on-stud split rims like on MH or older container chassis “California Rims”. They are still all over the roads in US but I can’t imagine anyone spec’ing them on a drive axle for any truck. Also don’t understand wanting tube tires anymore and thats what you get with split rims.

    A quick look up close under a house trailer will reveal how flimsy many of the
    frames, axles, and crappy suspensions are.
    Now that's fucked up.


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •