ROMER arm questions
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  1. #1
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    Default ROMER arm questions

    My work may have the opportunity to purchase a 2nd hand 2013 Romer measuring arm. We plan to use it for reverse engineering and inspection. I don't know much about these arms and am wondering if the is anything i need to check when i have a look at it? Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
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    I used a Faro for incoming inspections. It was awesome and easy to use. The problem experienced was when it failed, usually just before calibration was due. Then they offered a repair and calibration for $10,000. No Kidding. Find out before you buy what the support is for this device. They can afford to give them away just for the cost of a service plan.

  3. #3
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    If you are going to assess the instrunent, and test it for function, take some known objects for measurement. Using an arm-type unit is quite different from using a conventional CMM, at least with regard to dimensional accuracy/repeatability expectations. User technique is a big factor in quality of results.

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  5. #4
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    I bought a Romer arm some years ago and still have it. All arms regardless of brand come with an apparatus for doing an accuracy check. The Romer has a length bar which has the following:
    (a) a single point check which is basically an inverted cone for want of a better description (like you would get if you started drilling a hole with a 5mm drill bit) with the idea being you place the tip (I mostly use the ruby Ø6mm ball) in the hole and take the measurement in 5 or more arm positions. The 5 or more XYZ position readings should all be within an acceptable range of variation.
    (b) a length check using 2 points (inverted cones) that are a set (known) distance apart which is marked (engraved) on the bar. A word of caution here. Most people set their arm up on a table and put the bar flat (held down with G-clamps) also on the table however this only checks in one direction. If you have a vertical surface nearby, attach the bar there and take readings in that plane also. I got caught out in this manner and didn't realise until some years later. Last time I checked, recalibration here in Australia was around $3500AUD. Hope this helps.


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