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  1. #1
    rimcanyon's Avatar
    rimcanyon is offline Titanium
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    My 71 10EE has a spindle pulley that won't budge. I managed to take a chip out of it already trying to pull it with a Proto puller, but it can be tig-welded so I want to be careful not to damage it any more.

    The feed pulley is still in place, but the nut and lock washer at the end of the spindle came right off.

    I need to remove the pulley so that I can pull the gearbox.

    Any suggestions, anything I may have overlooked?

    thanks.

    -Dave

  2. #2
    peterh5322's Avatar
    peterh5322 is offline Diamond
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    "Any suggestions, anything I may have overlooked?"

    On the earlier machines, there is neither threading nor a nut on the spindle. No feed pulley, either.

    There are two keys in the spindle, and application of Kroil or a similar penetrating oil will allow the pulley to be pulled off with application of hand tugging alone. A few tugs will do it. At least on my '45 and '56.

    I see that in the later machines they added threading for a nut, and a sleeve (20237) and two additional keys in the spindle drives the feed belt. The nut secures the sleeve. (The pulley is secured conventionally).

  3. #3
    donie is offline Diamond
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    Somtimes things like pulleys really stick, and on this its even worse because there are two pulleys, with the outer one difficult two grab on to. I have found somtimes if you heat somthing like that up and apply a penatrating oil to it and let it cool down a couple of times it may break free from the expansion and contraction. Possibly the outer one could be pulled using one of those two piece bearing pullers.
    I noticed in the Monarch info on thier new drives, if the sheeves need to be replaced the cost is $600. Sombody posted a pic of some they made and they looked really nice.

  4. #4
    daryl bane is offline Stainless
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    If you have to tig that chip, you might want to have the pulley dynamically balanced. This might sound like overkill and probably is, but
    you run'er up to 4 grand and things can get
    hairy fast. I made a press in bush for my
    wallered out pulley and the balance was way
    out and had it rebalanced by a race engine guy.

  5. #5
    rimcanyon's Avatar
    rimcanyon is offline Titanium
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    Thanks for the suggestions. Donie, the bearing puller is a good idea, I may have to make one. I'll try some heat and Kroil as well.

  6. #6
    rimcanyon's Avatar
    rimcanyon is offline Titanium
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    A little perseverance, kroil, and a bearing puller did the trick. No heat needed.

    Now I need to get the pulley welded to
    repair the chip. I have a small Miller mig welder but I have never tried using it for aluminum. Bad idea?

    -Dave

  7. #7
    Bodgit is offline Hot Rolled
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    I'd suggest you have it tig welded (an AC process) by a good welder.
    Then return it and balance it as suggested above.
    Steve

  8. #8
    drof34 is offline Cast Iron
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    Pardon me for bringing up this old thread but there are a couple of new issues that are not discussed heretofore.

    This is a 1958 WIAD.

    First of all, my spindle pulley was also stuck or so I thought for it would move about 3/16" and no further. The feed (sleeve) pulley was extended into a counter bore of the main pulley and therefore out of sight. As it turned out there was a hardened steel collar in that counterbore between the two pulleys. This spacer collar is about 5/16" long and has no keyway in it. In order to pull both pulleys off together you would have to broach a keyway through the collar with the woodruff keys that are still under the feed pulley and thats not going to happen. However, I tryed and as a consequence I too broke a small chunk out of the main pulley.

    This brings up my next issue. What kind of aluminum is that thing made of and is it weldable.
    I know that the one on the spindle is hard, brittle and breaks without bending. Whereas the one on the gearbox will bend. I guess what I am asking is did you weld your's and if so was it satisfactory? I am considering cutting the dual Vs off both of them and making them for a polyvee belt.

    This is a hellava time to ask but is there any secrets to the assembly of the feed/threading gear box? I got a wheelbarrow full of bearings coming. Most, but not all, of the blind plugs have two setscrews in them which will be almost impossible to get back in there. Maybe putting them in a cooler full of dry ice might work. I'm wondering, as tight as those things are, if they (setscrews) are really necessary?

    All of the gears look great. There are two different DP's in there. Two are 20DP and the rest are 16DP. I suspect that this was done because the large one would have been too big to fit in there if they were also 16DP.

    Any help or advice would be appreciated.

    Thanks

    Jim W.

  9. #9
    rimcanyon's Avatar
    rimcanyon is offline Titanium
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    I never did weld that chipped pulley. I found another one, used, and installed it. I still have the orig. if you need two broken pulleys

    The end plugs and double setscrews are a pain, but the point is to adjust the preload on each shaft's bearings then lock the plate so that it won't move. Getting the preload right was a trial and error process. I didn't do it the right way (i.e. with a dial indicator), rather I tapped the end covers in until there was no play then tapped the shaft the other direction to release the load a bit, just enough that the bearing play "felt" right, then locked the setscrews.

    -Dave

  10. #10
    daryl bane is offline Stainless
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    Here ya go, some morale pictures. Make sure to mark the endcaps to their respective hole. Putting the setscrews back in is not that hard. When you get those caps were you want them, I would apply alittle wicking removeable strength Locktight around them to do a final seal. Rimcayon is correct, the gearbox is assembled by feel, and you will know when it is right or not, because originally it was RIGHT! Everything is on roller bearings and all shafts should spin and engage like butter. I find shifting mine, it feels like the tumblers in a fine swiss safe. Take that D. Thomas!




  11. #11
    drof34 is offline Cast Iron
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    Rimcanyon and Daryl

    Thanks guys for the help.

    No Rimcanyon, I don't think I need another broken pulley, at least not yet.

    Daryl, thanks for the moral er morale pictures.
    What are those four round things sitting on the end of that 2x4?

    Thanks again
    Jim W.

  12. #12
    daryl bane is offline Stainless
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    Excellent question, those are the apron worm gear drive bushings. The drive rod worm gear is captured between them. One set is off of a older round dial machine, they are solid bronze, and the other is off of my "59, they are cast iron. Since the holes in the bushes for the apron drive rod were all "wallered" out, I bored out the holes and pressed in some shouldered sintered bronze bushes, with the shoulder counterbored into the inside face of the bush to supply the bearing face for the drive worm.

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