Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    Milacron's Avatar
    Milacron is online now Diamond
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    Coastal Dogpatch, SC, USA
    Posts
    44,716

    Default Anyone know anything about spot welders on robots ?

    What I want to know is, are the spot welders used on robot arms typically self contained as far as the power supply requirements or do they typically have seperate power units ?

    I've got one on the end of a 2000 year Nachi robot which seems to be self contained...one cable connects to the robot control box for communication with the control apparently, and another huge cable (3 wires, one of which is ground) that connects to what bascially seems to be just a large on/off breaker and huge circuit breaker.

    There are at least 4 hoses coming off the spot welder...not sure if they are for air or water or both... my guess is that it may use air to close the spot welding electrodes and maybe the water is for cooling ??

  2. #2
    Tonytn36 is offline Diamond
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Southeastern US
    Posts
    4,763

    Default

    Two hoses will be for coolant, the other two are probably hydraulic. I've not seen any that are pneumatic, although they probably exist. They need large clamping forces usually and are either servo (newer systems) or hydraulic.
    All of the units I've seen have a separate control unit, usually mounted on the side of and integral to, the robot control cabinet. It *could* be self-contained though.
    Probably no clear answers without some pysical investigation though.

  3. #3
    Milacron's Avatar
    Milacron is online now Diamond
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    Coastal Dogpatch, SC, USA
    Posts
    44,716

    Default

    Further investigation reveals this is a Savair TMP series, which seems to have a large air cylinder for closing.

  4. #4
    Chris999 is offline Hot Rolled
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Vancouver B.C.
    Posts
    747

    Default

    Is Savair now part of ARO?

    anyway, robot units usually have the transformer integral with the welding gun.

    The lines are for air cylinder & water cooling, spot welding transformers are usually water cooled due to the large currents involved. The trans formers are usually driven with 480VAC.

    anything look similar here:
    http://www.tjsnow.com/supplies/aromac/index.htm

    http://www.arotechnologies.com/site/...asp?nav_id=672

    the cable from the weld gun is usually connected to a controller of some sort, which will fire a mechanical contactor or SCR / ignitron unit.

    Entron is a good place to start if there's no weld control.

    http://www.entroncontrols.com/

  5. #5
    Greg White is offline Titanium
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Pinckney Mi.
    Posts
    2,380

    Default

    Sometimes the actual welding tip is water/liquid cooled.
    Memories are vague,but I worked on the machining side of a place where we build pieces of the cars assm line,they were of the welding nature,longest 1 that i recall was 300 ft.
    I do recall machining copper alot,with plenty of waterlines installed.
    I found it abit scarey,mixing water and electricity.
    I will stop rambling now.
    gw

  6. #6
    Milacron's Avatar
    Milacron is online now Diamond
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    Coastal Dogpatch, SC, USA
    Posts
    44,716

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris999 View Post
    Is Savair now part of ARO?
    I called them just now and got the scoop. Savair was a US company and bought 9 years ago by a French company named ARO Welding (not to be confused with the USA ARO, which makes small pneumatic hand tools and production pneumatic fixtures)

    Savair was originally famous for air cylinders, hence the name "sav air"...as in efficient use of air.

    Engineering at ARO Welding is emailing me the drawings on this gun and it is indeed pnematic... 970 lbs of force at 70 PSI.

    Next to figure out is if it needs a seperate controller like the Entron that Chris refers to, or is the gun control integral to one of the boards already in the robot box, programmed at the same teach pendant the robot motion uses.

    ================================

    (on edit) Breaking news.. according to Nachi tech, the robot control also controls the spot welder...no seperate control needed.

  7. #7
    Milacron's Avatar
    Milacron is online now Diamond
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    Coastal Dogpatch, SC, USA
    Posts
    44,716

    Default

    Recently had a chance to buy a brand new ARO spot weld gun for cheap but afraid to buy it due to it being servo controlled rather than air close/open. My impression is servo would be superior but I suspect I would be forced to also buy an ARO servo controller to actually operate the darn thing. (which would probably cost a small fortune)

    Any thoughts on a potential DIY controller for a servo robot gun ?

    Keeping in mind I have the weld power suppy and weld control already and would just need to concoct a method of activating the close/open motor (but also keeping in mind it may be more complex than just "close/open" command... as there may be a need to control the torque of the close, speed of the close/open, and timing of the close cycle ! )

  8. #8
    micro's Avatar
    micro is offline Hot Rolled
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    953

    Default

    What type and size servo?

  9. #9
    Milacron's Avatar
    Milacron is online now Diamond
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    Coastal Dogpatch, SC, USA
    Posts
    44,716

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by micro View Post
    What type and size servo?
    Have no idea. I have the exact model number on the welder but naturally ARO is on vacation until July 13

    Looking at photo I can see part of the servo but don't recoginize it as any of the usual suspects... not Fanuc, Siemens, etc.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •