Mikron turret lathe
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  1. #1
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    Default Mikron turret lathe

    I'm posting this on behalf of a new PM member who has dial-up. He's considering selling this lathe and is trying to get some idea of what it's worth. The owner is Craig Crissman who posted in the "Mikron T90" thread recently. I guess Craig will chime in if there are any questions.

    Thanks for any input,

    Mike
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails mikron1.jpg   mikron2.jpg   mikron3.jpg   mikron4.jpg   mikron5.jpg  


  2. #2
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    I only know of one other Mikron lathe for sale, priced at $1500. This machine has a more modern enclosed headstock, similar fast action cross slide, standard cross slide, similar turret tailstock, more collets, bigger motor/trans, no face plate.

    If $1500 is a fair price for that machine (and I'm not saying it is), then maybe $1000 for this one.

    I have a similarly sized Japanese turret lathe, handy as all-get-out on the simple jobs.

    QB

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    My honest opinion is it will be a tough sell. Finding a buyer who will pay in this case is more of an issue than what exact price it is. For the record, all the machine listings by Irv Richlin (the eBay one referred to above) have been there forever without a scratch of interest.

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    That is a pretty one. I don't know what it might be worth, but ironically it might be worth more as a "lathe" than as a "turret lathe" Is that a turret attachment in a standard Morse taper quill or is it fixed to the quill ? Is there a way to seize the tailstock quill position in different locations ?

    Personally I'd prefer it as a turret lathe but I suspect many customers for this sort of lathe tend to worry it's been in "production" of some sort if it's turret style.

  5. #5
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    Milacron, according to Tony's site the indexing attachment is held in the tailstock ram by a draw tube. It's hard to see in the pic but it appears to have a locking clamp for the ram at the top-rear of the tailstock housing.
    Not sure what the tailstock bore is.

    Thanks for the replies.

  6. #6
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    A very similar "Tour Mikron T90 - Mikron Lathe" with normal tail stock, but no collets, was sold for 227 euro (nearly 340 US$ at the time) on ebay in Nov 2009 (item 110452620380).

    Charles

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    Yes, I also notice that of the Swiss plain lathes, it seems that only Schaublin holds much resale value. I have noticed that Simonet lathes, for example, often don't find a buyer. Habegger find similarly less interest even though all these makes (including Mikron) are very similar in construction, size, and use. In addition, the beds all have the same profile dimension---although for Mikron I am not 100% positive of that fact---and thus may interchange carriages, tailstocks, or really any of the accessories to be found.

    It should also be noted that the collets for a Mikron are the same dimension as Schaublin W-series collets (notably W20 on this machine) except for one. The pitch of the thread on the Mikron collets is different so the drawbar is not interchangeable with W20 collets.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Arthur.Marks View Post
    Yes, I also notice that of the Swiss plain lathes, it seems that only Schaublin holds much resale value. I have noticed that Simonet lathes, for example, often don't find a buyer. Habegger find similarly less interest even though all these makes (including Mikron) are very similar in construction, size, and use. In addition, the beds all have the same profile dimension---although for Mikron I am not 100% positive of that fact---and thus may interchange carriages, tailstocks, or really any of the accessories to be found.

    It should also be noted that the collets for a Mikron are the same dimension as Schaublin W-series collets (notably W20 on this machine) except for one. The pitch of the thread on the Mikron collets is different so the drawbar is not interchangeable with W20 collets.
    Schaublin and Habegger share the same bed profile, Simonet and Mikron are different (and different to each other). Schaublin, Habegger, and Simonet take the same collets- but- Simonet has a different thread on the spindle nose.

    Right that Mikron uses a different collet thread, and will work with an adapted drawbar on 'normal' w20's.

    Dixi is off in it's own little world, with different collet thread, slightly different spindle nose thread (ever so slightly larger in diameter than Schaublin), and totally different bed design.

    All are made to the highest possible standard. Habegger's 102 screwcutting lathe wins against a 102vm or n-vm for me simply because it has power cross feed .

    As to the Mikron for sale I wouldn't hope for more than 1000 bucks and it will probably take a long time to get that. A few hundred is more realistic.

  9. #9
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    Notice how the compound is made, you have four stops for the X and four for the Z you could set up one tool for your turning (rather than several box tools) and then have the turret for drills etc.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Screwmachine View Post
    Schaublin and Habegger share the same bed profile, Simonet and Mikron are different (and different to each other).
    Thank you for the clarification. I was ill-informed on that point.

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    I want to thank everyone that has posted on the value of the little T90. I'm kind of new to machine work & am a mechanic by trade. Just always had a fascination with building things & ideals come to me in my sleep so I started buying machine equipment. This T90 was part of a package deal I got from a friend. I've a couple people who have shown interest & had no clue were to start. So now at least I've some ideal. thanks again to everyone

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    I also just noticed one other detail...
    Is that a four speed motor?! I've never heard of such a thing, but it would be very useful in a turret lathe setup: four direct speeds without a belt change.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Arthur.Marks View Post
    I also just noticed one other detail...
    Is that a four speed motor?! I've never heard of such a thing,
    Herbert 2D turret lathes, made in the 1960's in the UK, had either 4 or 6 speed motors. The downside is all those extra windings made the motor rather large in size... a 5 hp Herbert motor was the physical size of a 25 hp single speed motor..but otherwise, worked well.

  14. #14
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    One last curiosity (to me at least )...
    Does the cover over the outside pulley position on the motor, which is connected by a chain to some round cover plate, have a function? That whole arrangement is peaking my curiosity. A simple pulley guard, some sort of esoteric quick belt changer, or just nothing

  15. #15
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    To me it looks like they gave up one step on the motor pulley to have a spindle brake.

    Todd

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    yes this is a 4 speed motor made by century hp .75 .5 .375 .25 rpm 1750-1165-875-575 first ive ever seen myself

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    the turret attachment can be removed & the tail stock can be lock down same as my logan yet im not sure what other attachments are available to fit the bore. I would be happy to measure the bore & look to see if there is a taper of any kind.

  18. #18
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    My Holbrook has a 3HP 3 speed motor, it's physically larger than the 15HP idle motor on my phase converter. It's a nice feature for making speed changes on the fly.

  19. #19
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    Here is a "proper" Mikron capstan/turret lathe!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails cimg1710-small-mikron.jpg  

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    Sadly not quite a 'proper' Mikron. I had a bed like that, but it doesn't appear in any Mikron catalogue. I eventually found it listed as a CVA bed. Many of these prismatic bed lathes had interchangeable parts, I even found the Mikron tailstock fitted the inner bed of a Cromwell S800!


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