TPC Training Systems vs 9-12mo Schooling? - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by DJ Berg View Post
    Cambridge Springs, my buddy works at the forge's cnc shop. No peice of paper, no $12.75/hr to start. Two interesting things i noted there, first inline heat treating of a part happened so fast, i'm not sure it did anything other than harden the inside of the part, i am not very versed in heat treating, but it would seem to me that part would need alot more time to be treated than the 10-15sec it was done in, but very neat to see.

    Second was some sort of a cnc lathe, as we walked by this specific machine, the operator was picking a birds nest out of it, at least 30 seconds to do so. It would seem to me that they would address said issue, and have the extra 30 seconds per part to add to completed parts vs the operator picking a mess out of the machine.
    I'm a bit cornfused, I changed the color on the part I am missing.

    What is the starting rate for that job ?

    It probably goes up quickly, especially if you have some experience (not on paper
    but you can prove it on the job)

    As far as the chips nesting part, leave it be, unless you get that job, then you can comment, and change things for the better. They run automotive parts,
    probably NOT mild steel, so a compromise was probably struck between tool life
    and chip formation, something you would not be privy to, on a walk thru.

    Don't tell them how to run the company, you need a job, and you have NO papers
    to backup any comments on how they run their shop.

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  3. #22
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    My appologies, i missed that post, was distracted by doug's response, and how to respond to it.

    I do agree, though I am not sure on hiw to go about "finding some one" in a town an hr away, and only know where the local areas of commerce are.

    Years back i applied to the local electricians union, and as expected, with out someone on the inside, i was s.o.l., goes back to my theory it's now what you kniw it's who you know.

    But that has been my taste of that, ever since, along side of the unions are dying i.m.o., sad but this is how I see the future of the american work force. Also note the job in meadville, american businesses loves to be cheap/have to be cheap, to keep up with the now global economy.

    Hell the G.E. plant in Erie here, is on its way out, if not completely gone as a union shop. Yet 2 hrs south there is another G.E. shop going strong. To qoute Phil Kerner aka "The Tool and Die Guy" he said "take the $10/hr pay cut, even at $20/hr, thats alot better money than most work in Erie". And sadly, from what i have gathered, through my life experiences, he was 100% right.

    It sucks to see guys get screwed, but this is the rust belt, where american business thrived, now its a neat place to go walk around and look at what was, before it is demolished and turned into some novelty business like breweries, i wonder how all these will do as the market gets more and more saturated with
    them.

  4. #23
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    Unions are not the only place to get apprenticeships. Get a job as a helper to an electrician, work your ass off and he can get you one. Keep on going to the union hall until they get sick of seeing you. You owe it to your family.

  5. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by DJ Berg View Post
    My appologies, i missed that post, was distracted by doug's response, and how to respond to it.

    I do agree, though I am not sure on hiw to go about "finding some one" in a town an hr away, and only know where the local areas of commerce are.

    Years back i applied to the local electricians union, and as expected, with out someone on the inside, i was s.o.l., goes back to my theory it's now what you kniw it's who you know.

    But that has been my taste of that, ever since, along side of the unions are dying i.m.o., sad but this is how I see the future of the american work force. Also note the job in meadville, american businesses loves to be cheap/have to be cheap, to keep up with the now global economy.

    Hell the G.E. plant in Erie here, is on its way out, if not completely gone as a union shop. Yet 2 hrs south there is another G.E. shop going strong. To qoute Phil Kerner aka "The Tool and Die Guy" he said "take the $10/hr pay cut, even at $20/hr, thats alot better money than most work in Erie". And sadly, from what i have gathered, through my life experiences, he was 100% right.

    It sucks to see guys get screwed, but this is the rust belt, where american business thrived, now its a neat place to go walk around and look at what was, before it is demolished and turned into some novelty business like breweries, i wonder how all these will do as the market gets more and more saturated with
    them.
    Well, go to Grove city then.
    Titsville just lost Buffalo Structural, so there's more people looking for
    work.

    You moved from Jamestown to Titsville, G.C. isn't much further,
    IIRC they aren't demanding much education either.

    BTW I know people that work there, they drive from Franklin & New Castle, they
    say the house prices are too high in G.C.

    Word is the Erie plant is hiring some drafters, starting at $19.
    Last edited by digger doug; 01-19-2018 at 07:14 PM.

  6. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    I'm a bit cornfused, I changed the color on the part I am missing.

    What is the starting rate for that job ?

    It probably goes up quickly, especially if you have some experience (not on paper
    but you can prove it on the job)

    As far as the chips nesting part, leave it be, unless you get that job, then you can comment, and change things for the better. They run automotive parts,
    probably NOT mild steel, so a compromise was probably struck between tool life
    and chip formation, something you would not be privy to, on a walk thru.

    Don't tell them how to run the company, you need a job, and you have NO papers
    to backup any comments on how they run their shop.
    Starting rate if i remember correctly was in the $12.50-75, if hired. As to the heat treating, yeah had to be some carbon steel, i'm pretty sure it was a wheel bearing assembly, and i do not know of any way of hardening mild steel short of carborizing, of which would be neat to see in an automated process like that. And again, i am not very fluent in heat treating, building my way up to it, managed to aquire a Rockwell tester form ebay, $20 and a trip out to Akron, a little clean up, and a custom 50kg weight, she works. Next steps, finding a decent array of different hardness metals, find some where I can test them and use them as standards(far cheaper than $30 a piece on ebay, and close enough for me, in my garage, to give me an idea of what metal was used on a mystery piece of whatever), and still searching for the right cheap ceramics kiln, modify the heating element controls and learn more on heat treat and tempering.

    As to the birds nesting, it just seemed like a loss of production time, and as you say it is most likely a compromise of the available resources. And I actually asked my buddy that is a supervisor up there about that, i guess it has been an ongoing issue to get that resolved, and still has not been solved. He came over for help and tools swapping wheel bearings, but there was nothing wrong with them, after that was done and we went for a ride i crawled under his truck and found the u-joint that had a custom cap that didn't think it needed bearings. One more trip to the parts store, and 20 min later his shimmy in his truck was gone.

    Also thank you for taking the time to share your knowledge pertaining to what is right here pretty much at my door step, I am grateful for your insight.

  7. #26
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    I'm pretty they are induction heat treating.
    Cambridge plant had a big banner outside showing the Toyota
    front axles that they won the contract for.

    If your buddy is the supervisor, why can't he get you in ?

    The problem if I read you correctly, is that you have some knowledge above
    and beyond an "off the street hire" but without "Paper" they don't know
    what you can do.

    So get in that door, and show them what you've learned.

    Yes, you'll have to take off shift, yes low pay as well.
    But you should move up quickly if you have a brain & drive to use it.

    How about the current job ?
    Can you get into the maintenance area ?

    I see forces external & internal shooting you down (too many restrictions).
    Last edited by digger doug; 01-19-2018 at 07:16 PM.

  8. #27
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    I would hope your chum with the truck would help you get a 'foot in the door.' It might not be ideal but it would get you onto the treadmill of working in a field you want to be in.
    One final suggestion. It appears you are pretty 'handy.' You may live in a poor area but there are always rich people who want someone else to do things for them. My neighbour has a 'handyman' business. He mows lawns, cleans gutters, paints,changes light bulbs for banks, moves furniture(and boxes of paper for banks) and just about anything people want done. He takes pets to the vet and picks up groceries.He started out with a pickup. He now has 3 vehicles, a trailer and 8 blokes - I have worked for him replacing ceiling tiles in a Chik-Fil- A. He has no shortage of work.

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