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  1. #21
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    Feb 2017
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    Where I work we have a few apprentices around the factory and 1 in the machine shop with me. She will be our 3rd apprentice to have come out of the machine shop when she completes it in another 3 years. We try to get well motivated apprentices that want to stay on for many years to come.

    We have problems even finding people to come for interviews because machinists are in such high demand we find training our own apprentices work best for us plus there are government incentives to hire new apprentices so it’s win win for us.

  2. #22
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    May 2007
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    Central Texas, West and North of Austin
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    We are sort of in a desert as far as machinists go, so we are almost forced to bring in entry level people, most barely out of high school. The closest tech school that makes any effort concerning machining is a good 100 miles away, at TSTC in Waco. We've had a couple of guys start here, then quit here and go through their program in Waco. Both are still in machine work.
    A a general rule, we get to keep one in five of the entry level people for a period of two years or more. They either quit and go to other shops, other fields, or go back to school. I have one, my successor apparent, that has been here more than 10 years.
    I, myself, plan on retiring in March. I'll still do some consulting, programming as necessary. A few other efforts. We've tried to bring my successor along as well as possible in the interim, but I think he'll progress much faster if we just kick him off in the deep end and stick around to keep him from drowning. Theory, anyway.
    We have brought in these entry level folks sort of as needed. We try NOT to lay people off, as it's too tough to start over from scratch. When we DO have to reduce force, I use that as a weeding tool, as anyone would expect. The less productive you are, or the less promise you show, the closer to the ax you live.
    This year, we have, for the first time, brought in a high school kid. One of those half day work, half day school programs. He has been a pleasant surprise. Actually shows up to work on time, does what I tell him. Takes instruction well. To bad I'm not gonna be here long enough to actually make something more than an operator out of him. Kid shows some interest, and has some aptitude to work with.
    So. In answer to your question, as to what are WE doing to alleviate the shortage in our area, Hiring what we can, when we can, and now working with the local high school, to bring in an train. But seeing limited success. I don't know what the average is, but as I said, our retain rate is only about 20%.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    May 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ohio Mike View Post
    Sounds like the votech needs to sort this out. It won't matter how much stuff people donate to the program if the major firms in the are going to waste can all the resumes coming from those programs. I suspect something else has changed. Either way it doesn't matter their program is broken. Education isn't about selling the program to students its about placing students into jobs. When that happens students will line up to get in. Unfortunately many schools in the states are now designed to produce a product without a market. What I like to call "square eggs".
    I graduated in 2000, in 96/97 I took the last year of metal shop at high school. In 2006, the wood shop closed its doors. They have replaced it with sit down classes. Also when I graduated, there were over 250 people in the FFA program, in 2016, there were only about 22 people. So that's the high school.

    The Votech, at some point, 2010-2013, is now able to become a full fledged school, that includes funding from the state and not just from the local schools. So now they have cut back on trades that cost money and don't bring in more income since they aren't based on the local high schools. Last year, they have their own sports teams now.

    Now as with everything, money is driving almost every program anymore. The boy scouts of America was driven by people who wanted young people to move forward by passing down skills and knowledge. Things have changed and the BSA now gets xxx dollars per eagle scout, so they have been rewriting the books so they can push people through as fast as possible. The average age of an eagle scout in 1998 when I got it was 16-17, it is now at 14-15. The books have changed over time as well. When rock climbing badge came out, I was excited about it because it was what you really have to do, I love to go rock climbing ever since I was 12. As of last year, you can now get this badge sitting inside of a "scout college classroom" without windows.

    So at least around here in NJ, it is hard to get people interested in things. Plus the insurance here blows.

    Sent from my 2PS64 using Tapatalk

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
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    Blame whoever had the bright idea to brainwash teachers or schools that you couldn't become anything if you didn't go to a 4yr school. I was LIED to that I needed 2yrs of a foreign language class to get into the State schools. I was led to believe since middle school that if you went to a local tech school you were getting C-D grades in the 90s. They started reducing the classes as well.

    Also, I FIRMLY believe training and getting kids excited is in high school....but they don't get good training because they are required to hire someone with a teaching degree...so yeah...hire a 22yr old you doesn't know jack shit about real work and never been in the field. Then if your LUCKY these kids go to a tech school and actually understand stuff. Otherwise the tech schools are teaching people you never took shop class or the school never had one. Think about that. The kids graduating the tech schools..really are at a high school level or even worse. That is why all the companies are complaining. Oh well.


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