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  1. #1
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    Default 10K Question and Advice

    Can anyone tell me what this rod on the back of the headstock is for? It is preventing the lid from opening, how do I get the lid open.
    img_2327.jpg

    Now for the advice part. I acquired this late from a deceased friend. I do not know the history of it or how much use it has. I am new to the lathe world. I want to go through it to be sure all the bearings are ok, replace felts, etc and paint it. Problem is I have several projects going and need to use it. So, before powering it up, what should I look for and do to ensure all is ok? I have bought the replacement felts and the book to go along with it as well as the book 'How to Run a Lathe." Any pointers are much appreciated.


    Keith

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    The belt tension to the head stock must be released be before you can open the top cover. The rod is an interlock to prevent the lid being open when running.

    If you can show us more pictures of the machine, to show its condition, we can better advise you.

    Don't assume you must start tearing it apart yet. Too many get into trouble trying to "improve" things without knowing what they're doing.

    Pete

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    Thanks for the reply Pete. I do have the belt tensioner released on the side of the cabinet so there is no tension on the belt. Will check it again and hopefully get the cover open. Once I do that I will send more pics.

    Thanks again.
    Keith

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    Attached are some photos that hopefully provide an experienced eye a glimpse of what kind of use this machine has had. Suggestions on preventative maintenance before I fire it up?front-2.jpgfront.jpggears-2.jpggears.jpgheadstock-1.jpg.

    Thanks,
    Keith

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    Also, the cross slide that came with the machine had a crack in it. I purchased a 'new' one from e-bay and need to transfer the screw. How do I get the piece on the end out of the 'new' slide so that the screw can be installed? Is it pressed in?cross-slide.jpg

    P.S. how do I get the photos to show right side up same as I put them in??

    Keith

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    Use some sort of light oil or solvent to clean as much junk off the moving surfaces as you can. BEFORE YOU MOVE ANYTHING!!

    Then oil the heck out of everything. Type of oil isn't important yet, just get everything oily!! Fill all the oil cups, oil holes, everything. Later you can use the 'proper' oils in each location. Any oil is better than none.

    Work things a bit and wipe off dirt as you see it then add more oil. These machines are "total loss" machines. The oil you put on/in just drips off or you wipe it off. Then you add more. More is better.

    Regarding that replacement saddle: It is not likely that it will fit correctly. Saddles are fit to the lathe. You can't expect to swap it out without going through the fitting process. You don't show the defect in the original saddle so I can't say if it's a fatal flaw. It may not be! If you can post a pic of that flaw, please do.

    The dial in the replacement saddle will screw out just like the original did. Look for setscrews, etc. Is the replacement saddle from a similar age 10K or an older 9?

    Pete

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  9. #7
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    Treat a South Bend lathe like an AMF built Harley... If it's not leaking, you're out of oil.

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    Personally, I would just oil it up and start using it. The paint is not too bad, and it looks like a newer lathe from the 60s or newer.

    In regard to the cross slide, if you could find a bottom and top which were shipped together, that would be better, but even so the height might be different on your lathe.

    Your cracked one might be able to be braised. Do you have the top that goes on it ? And can you post a picture of the crack and/or pieces ?

    There should be a Catalog number on the thread plate of the gearbox.

    There is also a serial number on the right end of the bed, on top.

    Can you provide those numbers ? Those could tell if it has a hardened bed or not.

    Also, when you open the top, does it have a flat belt or v-belt ?

  11. #9
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    The numbers on this 10K are: Model # CL370RD; Serial # 36451K. The numbers on the old and replacement cross slide (saddles really) do not match. The old/original one reads S400NK with and A41 stamped on it. The replacement saddle reads S102NK with what appears to be S99 stamped on it. As for the cross feed screw collar piece I can't seem to get out of the replacement saddle, there are no spanner wrench hole or set screws. I do have the top compound rest unit that came with the original saddle. No idea if the replacement saddle is from a similar vintage unit or not. As for the belt, it is a flat drive belt. Here are photos of the cracked original saddle as well as the numbers for the original and replacement saddles.

    Sure to appreciate the help!!
    Keithcrack-2.jpgcrack-3.jpgorig-cross-slide-numbers.jpgorig.-cross-slide-crack.jpgreplacement-cross-slide-numbers.jpg

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    Different generations of saddle. It will probably interchange just fine, but you'll certainly have to scrape it in. Understand that machine tools are nothing like automobiles. You cannot expect to buy a part from the same model and just swap it, without doing a fair bit of alignment and hand work. Blue the bedways at the tailstock end, and see what sort of contact you get. If it looks reasonable, grab the bushing with vice grips and twist it out, or drill a pin spanner hole.

    allan

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    yes, just drill a spanner hole if there is not one.

    Don't worry about that little crack, doesn't look loke it will hurt anything.

    but by all means get yourself a scraper and some basic tools,learn a few things, practice a bit, and fit up the new saddle...eventually.

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    Hello KeeithW
    Looks like you have a really nice lathe. Please don't use the ebay saddle on that lathe until you have it scraped in to fit the lathe bed. Like iwananew10K says Don't worry about that little crack, doesn't look like it will hurt anything.

    I just took a little time and drew a hand sketch of a fitted machine clamp I would make if it were mine and the clamp would not look out of place if done right. A friend and I years past made a clamp like this for his mill and he is still using it and has not got any worse.
    Chet

    Attachment
    img073.jpg

  15. #13
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    Only thing you might want to consider doing with that crack is drilling a hole at the stopping point so it doesn't continue.

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  17. #14
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    Guys, thanks much for the great advice. Coyotetech-love your idea about the clamp and will go that route.

    Very grateful,
    Keith


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