1943 South Bend 16" x 60" Lathe Resurrection - Page 16
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  1. #301
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    If anyone is interested, I thought I'd show a quick real world comparison of shrinkage between the pattern and the cast part.

    I was told ahead of time by the foundry to make the pattern larger than the desired finished part by "1/8" per foot." That math works out to 1/98th, so I scaled my Fusion360 CAD model up by 1% as the last step before sending it to John Saunders' CNC. The photos below show both the pattern and the part overlaying a 1:1 scale printout of both the scaled model and the as-designed model with no scaling.

    Overall, the shrinkage guidance was really good. There are some minor deviations between the as-designed outline and the finished part. This is mainly the result of my overzealous hand sanding to clean up the CNC tool marks. I'm positive that if John had a second chance at cutting the patterns and could modify his workholding strategy, there would be no hand sanding required at all.

    img_6330.jpg img_6332.jpg img_6333.jpg

    I should note that, if you're using a material other than gray cast iron, the shrinkage factor is likely to be different. Just check with your foundry and they'll tell you what they typically experience and adjust your pattern scale accordingly.

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    Castings are, by nature, rough. For these parts to function as a sealed housing for all the switches and the tachometer, I needed to clean up the mating surfaces between the enclosure and the back cover.

    There's an old saying that goes, "When all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail." In this case, when all you have is a lathe, everything looks like a turning job. I knew the setup was a little sketchy, so I added a piece of all-thread through the spindle bore to keep the part from popping out of the old smooth jaw chuck.

    I'll be honest and say I was a little scared of it at first and tried to baby the cut. That was a horrible idea because cast iron doesn't like to be babied. Light cuts just chew tools up and you get nowhere. Once I figured this out, the job got a lot easier. The first one took over two hours messing around with feeds, speeds, and depth of cut. The second one took five minutes, and that's only because I didn't go quite deep enough on the first pass.

    img_6383.jpg img_6384.jpg img_6386.jpg

    And here's a short video compilation cutting the second piece. In hindsight I wish I had centered up the all-thread because it makes it harder to watch than it already is. Haha, enjoy a good laugh at my expense. The cover plates are up next for the same facing op, but I'll be using a faceplate for those. Should be a little easier.


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  4. #303
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    How many dollars to have those cast, if you don't mind me asking?

    -Tim

  5. #304
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frenchy View Post
    How many dollars to have those cast, if you don't mind me asking?

    -Tim
    $210 including shipping. I think Cattail charges a basic mold setup fee that depends on complexity, then $1/lb for the material. My average cost for six parts was about $35 each not including the cost of the patterns.

    Full disclosure: If John had charged market rate for the CNC work, it might not have seemed like such a bargain.

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    Wow, that's very reasonable for just a few parts. Nice work on the whole lathe by the way.

    -Tim

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    You never know who will see a post on social media these days. Coastal Enterprises, the company that makes the high density urethane material we used for the casting patterns, saw the casting pictures on Instagram. They reached out about doing a little company blog feature, link below. If you're reading this and thinking of a casting you'd like to make, they do offer free samples and tech support on how to cut and shape it.

    Lost and Foundry: Restoring a WWII Era 16" Lathe - Coastal Enterprises

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  11. #307
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    Continuing the machining of the switch enclosure castings. I picked up a 13-1/4" faceplate off eBay and was very fortunate to find the screw hole pattern in my back cover plate lined up perfectly with slots in the faceplate. Although they will later be drilled and countersunk for 5/16-18 oval head screws, it worked out well to temporarily drill and tap the holes for 1/4-20 screws just long enough for facing.

    The facing did get a tiny bit chattery around the edges, but nothing a gasket won't seal up once the screws are tightened to the rest of the housing.

    img_6433.jpg img_6432.jpg img_6455.jpg img_6465.jpg

    Edit: This is a good time to point out an observation. It looks to me like 13-1/4" diameter is about the largest faceplate that will fit on a 16" South Bend headstock (while a 16/24 machine with the same spindle thread could take a bigger plate). The rim of the faceplate nestles into the space between the two "Sphinx feet" on the headstock casting. I realized this when screwing the faceplate onto the spindle for the first time with two fingers on my right hand between the back of the plate and the headstock. The pain started just as the faceplate threads bottomed out on the spindle. One more thing I'll never do again...

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    Next up is putting a bore through the bottom of the enclosure casting where the conduit pipe with all the wiring passes through. I'm using 1-1/4" nominal size Schedule 40 steel pipe, so it's about 1.660" outside diameter, give or take a few thou for the out of round shape.

    This would have been a really easy job on a vertical or horizontal mill with a boring head. Having only a lathe, a faceplate, and a few odd right angle blocks around, it was a bit of a Rube Goldberg project. Definitely should have used better quality screws, but it's what I had on hand.

    It worked, but I'd probably swallow my pride to ask for a favor from a mill owner before doing it again.

    img_6473.jpg img_6474.jpg img_6475.jpg img_6485.jpg img_6489.jpg

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    Sorry to hear about your fingers. Did you say something about that time?

    It looks like the parts fit up well together. You may not even need a gasket.

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    [QUOTE=nt1953;3054491]Sorry to hear about your fingers. Did you say something about that time?
    QUOTE]

    Nothing I would want to repeat here. I get to explain my two blue fingernails a couple times a day in meetings as well.

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    Cool Thanks!

    Quote Originally Posted by thomasutley View Post
    You never know who will see a post on social media these days. Coastal Enterprises, the company that makes the high density urethane material we used for the casting patterns, saw the casting pictures on Instagram. They reached out about doing a little company blog feature, link below. If you're reading this and thinking of a casting you'd like to make, they do offer free samples and tech support on how to cut and shape it.

    Lost and Foundry: Restoring a WWII Era 16" Lathe - Coastal Enterprises
    Thank you for the shout out. Anything we can do to answer questions about machining Precision Board HDU, we are happy to do! We have speeds and feeds info, router bit selection guide and more on our website (linked to above) or you can call our tech support. Thanks!

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    Making some progress toward wiring up the controls.

    As mentioned in a previous post, I'm adding a spindle tach with the new control setup and mounting the Hall Effect tach sensor on top of the bullgear. This location was chosen to avoid drilling all the way through the headstock casting.

    To mount the Hall Effect sensor to the cast housing, I made a simple DIY circuit board. This board holds the sensor, a pull-up resistor required by the sensor, and a 3-pole connector. The sensor needed a mounting bracket/plate of some sort anyway, so it just made sense to use a rigid circuit board rather than a jumble of wires. If there's interest, I can write up a separate thread on making boards like this and put it over in the electronics subforum. Also, there are several companies online now who make custom boards and ship them directly to you. You design the board in their software and a professional quality board shows up in the mail a couple weeks later. Small boards like this one cost only $20-$30 to have made, so don't shy away from a custom board if the alternative is a bird's nest of wires and tape.

    img_7127.jpg img_7130.jpg

    To get the Hall Effect sensor close enough (within 0.060") to the bullgear to pick up the tooth count, I needed a hole in the existing bullgear cover. Somehow I neglected to take a photo with the hole drilled, but shown here is the location of the hole prior to drilling.

    img_7132.jpg img_7121.jpg

    Adding a felt gasket to keep chips and coolant out, everything should be out of harm's way. The three small wires exit the back of the cast cover via a stainless 5/16" diameter flex conduit taken from an old DRO pickup unit. The conduit will have a strain relief installed to avoid stressing the wires in the 3-pole connector.

    img_7170.jpg

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  19. #313
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    After getting my feet wet etching the little circuit board above, I was ready to tackle the part of this restoration that I've been dreading ever since the day I brought the machine home: the collection of etched nameplates and tags.

    Several of the tags on my machine were either missing entirely or damaged to the point of being illegible. Most of the remaining tags were made of a very soft metal (tin? brass was probably in short supply during the War) and so thin that painting and scraping seemed like a really tough way to go. Ultimately I decided to go back with all new brass tags.

    Like the circuit card etching, the process of etching brass nameplates probably merits a separate post to explain the details. What I'll say here is it was an exercise in patience figuring out how to create the artwork and transfer it successfully to the metal as an etching mask. I have a new respect for the folks who offer reproduction plates for sale now that I appreciate how many hours they have invested in the first plate.

    For reference, the paint is Duplicolor brand rattle can from the auto parts store. The red that came closest to my original tags is the Ford engine block color. All the tags were given a clearcoat of the same Duplicolor product after sanding through to the brass.

    Also: The lubrication note on the gearbox tag is not original to my machine. Seemed like a good addition, though, which the factory corrected on later models.

    img_6948.jpg img_7083.jpg img_7081.jpg img_7079.jpg img_7084.jpg

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  21. #314
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    More reproduction tags...

    img_6998.jpg img_7016.jpg

    And a few more which are not factory plates but for this novice user seemed like a good idea...

    img_7044.jpg img_7080.jpg img_7021.jpg

    I have not yet installed one of the last set of three shown for crossfeed and compound dials. My machine came from the factory with the small indirect (radius) dial on the crossfeed. A large indirect dial was installed on the compound sometime before I got it. I have since picked up a large direct (diameter) dial set for the crossfeed but need to do some mods to the screw before I can install it. My plan is to wind up with a large direct-reading dial on the crossfeed for turning diameters and leave the indirect dial on the compound for threading. This was Ted's suggestion, and I like it. Once the dials are in place, I'll add the appropriate tag to the top of the compound.

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  23. #315
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    First rate work all the way.

    Thanks

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    Those really look awesome. You may have an alternate income source there if you wanted to develop it. I know i'd take 2 each of the feed direction and feed selection if you were to make them available, paint or no paint. Pretty handy when you don't run the machine for a while, and your memory is a little iffy anyway, haha. I'm digging the reminder for belt tension as well.

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    Quote Originally Posted by texasgunsmith View Post
    Those really look awesome. You may have an alternate income source there if you wanted to develop it. I know i'd take 2 each of the feed direction and feed selection if you were to make them available, paint or no paint. Pretty handy when you don't run the machine for a while, and your memory is a little iffy anyway, haha. I'm digging the reminder for belt tension as well.
    I like to say the new tags are for my son, but the reality is I need them, too.

    Once I get the wiring wrapped up, I'll see about making more tags. I want to play around with different masking techniques to see if I can get a sharper image transfer. These look OK to me for a 74-year-old machine, almost as if they were original. Paying customers, however, are likely to have higher expectations so I need to step up my game.

    BTW, you still interested in that spare 16" underdrive base/leg unit I have? I haven't spent any time trying to sell it, but it's ready to run right now for someone with a dodgy cabinet or motor.

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    Quote Originally Posted by thomasutley View Post
    I like to say the new tags are for my son, but the reality is I need them, too.

    Once I get the wiring wrapped up, I'll see about making more tags. I want to play around with different masking techniques to see if I can get a sharper image transfer. These look OK to me for a 74-year-old machine, almost as if they were original. Paying customers, however, are likely to have higher expectations so I need to step up my game.

    BTW, you still interested in that spare 16" underdrive base/leg unit I have? I haven't spent any time trying to sell it, but it's ready to run right now for someone with a dodgy cabinet or motor.

    I can understand about not getting side tracked in other adventures, as regards to the tags atm, it seems my number one commodity is alaways time, or lack there of. If and when it happens be sure to let me know.

    For the underside base, I seem to recall it was attractively priced, and new bushings for the lower pulley assembly I believe. Right now I'm dealing with a lack of room, and am considering rearranging things to create some more usable space. On top of that, I probably have about a year or two worth of work before I get deep into the next lathe. So I can't right now, but out of curiosity is that a 3 or 4 belt position pulley in there ?

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