1943 South Bend 16" x 60" Lathe Resurrection - Page 3
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  1. #41
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    And finally...down to the apron casting. Total apron teardown time: two hours, a lot of which was spent consulting the Ilion book and most of the rest dealing with taper pins.

    apron35.jpgapron36.jpg

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    Quote Originally Posted by thomasutley View Post
    Thanks for sharing, Ryan!

    Hope you don't mind me pointing out to anyone reading this in the future that the photo above is related to the oft-referenced Ryan Batelle South Bend 13" restoration that many consider to be the best documented 13" resto log ever made.
    No it isn't

    My name isn't Ryan and my 13" restoration blog is most definately not one of the best ever made
    I did build a roadster however, and it's a great deal of fun, will be getting her out again as soon as the snow and hail stops falling.

    I appreciate the thought though, and anyone's welcome to use any of the pics from my website, if they're helpful in any way.

    It's AlfaDax.com/oldtools.htm for the SB rebuild (still in progress), just AlfaDax.com for the rest, if anyone's interested.

    - Andy, not Ryan

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    They were all drive rivets on mine, and that's what the Ilion book says to expect, so I'd guess that they've been removed before.

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    Quote Originally Posted by The Black Flash View Post
    No it isn't

    My name isn't Ryan and my 13" restoration blog is most definately not one of the best ever made
    I did build a roadster however, and it's a great deal of fun, will be getting her out again as soon as the snow and hail stops falling.

    I appreciate the thought though, and anyone's welcome to use any of the pics from my website, if they're helpful in any way.

    It's AlfaDax.com/oldtools.htm for the SB rebuild (still in progress), just AlfaDax.com for the rest, if anyone's interested.

    - Andy, not Ryan
    I did get the name wrong (yikes--sorry!), but not the quality of the restoration log! Was a motivator for me to get off my duff and drag an old machine home, and I know many others will appreciate it as well, ANDY!

    Thanks for sharing with us!

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    Quote Originally Posted by thomasutley View Post
    Thanks for sharing, Ryan!

    Hope you don't mind me pointing out to anyone reading this in the future that the photo above is related to the oft-referenced Ryan Batelle South Bend 13" restoration that many consider to be the best documented 13" resto log ever made. Whether it's a 10L, 13, 14.5, 16, or 16/24, your log is a wealth of info with great photos, detailed disassembly and reassembly instructions, and just plain old perspective on what matters and what doesn't. You do a great job pointing out how to live with and work around some aspects of machine wear and still make good parts.

    Once readers get past the SB log, the rest of your site is also outstanding. Feel free to post the direct URL if you don't mind the bandwidth on your server.

    How's the roadster doing these days? Any more mods since finishing it the first time?

    Take care!
    CORRECTION TO EARLIER POST: The Black Flash is Andy, not Ryan, and his excellent 13" restoration log can be found here: AlfaDax.com
    Last edited by thomasutley; 03-02-2015 at 11:04 AM.

  6. #46
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    Tonight I got the underdrive assembly up on the bench and pulled the motor. I have a gentleman interested in buying the 1.5hp single phase 120V/208V/230V motor so I can put the proceeds toward a 3-phase motor run by a VFD for speed control options. It's neither here nor there, but thought somebody might be interested in options for replacing their motor should they need to.

    This particular motor has been running in the machine for some number of years, and apparently worked just fine for the previous owner. However, it is not an exact fit. Whoever installed it had to slot the motor frame mounting holes to make it work.

    It's missing two of the four belt grooves that would have been on the OEM motor pulley. Just one more part I have to find.

    motor01.jpgmotor04.jpgmotor07.jpgmotor08.jpg

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    Here's where I really need some advice from you cast iron experts out there.

    My pedestal base has a chunk missing. Where there should be a bridge of material from front to back beneath the inboard access/vent hole in the base, there's only air. No way of knowing how it happened, but it was long enough ago to have been painted over with the layer of machine gray covering the rest of the machine.

    I don't feel it's necessarily a performance issue as the machine's regular floor mounts are front and back, not left and right. I do know myself, however, and cosmetically it will drive me crazy looking at it after putting so much work into refurbishing the machine.

    The cover for the access hole is missing as well so I have to replace it regardless. However, I don't necessarily have to replace it with the stock design. One option might be to fabricate a sheet metal louvered panel that extends down to the floor and wraps over the missing section.

    Another option might be to bolt in a reinforcement of some kind that spans the gap and fiberglass the contours to match.

    Another option, though not a good one for my budget, is to buy a replacement base from someone like Ted.

    So....how would you fix this if it were yours?

    pedestal01.jpgpedestal02.jpgpedestal03.jpg

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    Quote Originally Posted by thomasutley View Post
    Here's where I really need some advice from you cast iron experts out there.

    My pedestal base has a chunk missing. Where there should be a bridge of material from front to back beneath the inboard access/vent hole in the base, there's only air. No way of knowing how it happened, but it was long enough ago to have been painted over with the layer of machine gray covering the rest of the machine.

    I don't feel it's necessarily a performance issue as the machine's regular floor mounts are front and back, not left and right. I do know myself, however, and cosmetically it will drive me crazy looking at it after putting so much work into refurbishing the machine.

    The cover for the access hole is missing as well so I have to replace it regardless. However, I don't necessarily have to replace it with the stock design. One option might be to fabricate a sheet metal louvered panel that extends down to the floor and wraps over the missing section.

    Another option might be to bolt in a reinforcement of some kind that spans the gap and fiberglass the contours to match.

    Another option, though not a good one for my budget, is to buy a replacement base from someone like Ted.

    So....how would you fix this if it were yours?

    pedestal01.jpgpedestal02.jpgpedestal03.jpg
    it looks like you left the door behind
    post 11 picture it stands next to the door?

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    I think the best solution would be to keep your eyes open for someone parting out a 16" SB and buy the base.
    I think these often end up getting scrapped from a parts machine, because it's not a component that someone would often need to replace. I would think you could pick one up for a little more than scrap price.
    A few years back, I scrapped a couple bases and beds from parts machines. I tried for months to sell them cheap, but no takers.

    btm

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    Quote Originally Posted by janvanruth View Post
    it looks like you left the door behind
    post 11 picture it stands next to the door?
    This is actually the inboard (right) side of the pedestal base. I have the door on the front and the cover for the access panel on the opposite side. Only this side is missing, presumably because it was broken at the same time the base got whacked.

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    Quote Originally Posted by btm View Post
    I think the best solution would be to keep your eyes open for someone parting out a 16" SB and buy the base.
    I think these often end up getting scrapped from a parts machine, because it's not a component that someone would often need to replace. I would think you could pick one up for a little more than scrap price.
    A few years back, I scrapped a couple bases and beds from parts machines. I tried for months to sell them cheap, but no takers.

    btm
    There are two 16" machines being parted out on eBay right now, and it's likely at least one of them has a base with the four bolts going down from the bed like mine (vs. two down and two up on some according to Ted). The seller is more than happy to ship me one, but the freight cost for a base like this, which weighs somewhere in the neighborhood of 400-500 lbs, would likely be more than paying the cost of fabricating and welding in a patch.

    I want to do the repair, if for no other reason just for the challenge involved. It's above my current skill level as a welder, but I could fabricate a strongback panel on the inside and then fiberglass the contours to match.

    Decisions, decisions...

  12. #52
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    Another option would be to make a pattern of the piece you need, have it cast and braze it into place.

    Mitch

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    Quote Originally Posted by PaPaMitch View Post
    Another option would be to make a pattern of the piece you need, have it cast and braze it into place.

    Mitch
    Any recommendations on foundries that do custom pieces like that if were to make the pattern?

    I actually have three items in mind that would be great as castings. The first is this patch panel. The second is a skirt that would sit beneath the pedestal base on the left to elevate the lathe to a more comfortable working height for my tall frame, say 4" or so. The third piece would be a corresponding riser on the right side between the bottom of the bed and the top of the one-piece leg I already have. It would be the same height as the skirt on the left side less the thickness of a chip pan sandwiched between it and the top of the leg.

    I realize these are all parts that could be fabricated as weldments, but I would enjoy the experience of making a pattern and having them cast if the cost isn't prohibitive.

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    The one I've heard of most that people have had a lot of custom castings done is Cattail Foundry. I don't have their info right off hand. I'll have to do some searching.

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    I did a search and found the info on #13 of this thread.

    Casting repair

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    Quote Originally Posted by PaPaMitch View Post
    I did a search and found the info on #13 of this thread.

    Casting repair
    Mitch,

    Thanks so much for the reference. It's interesting reading others' experience with Cattail Foundry. They're Amish, so don't use email or telephone except they will apparently respond to a voicemail left on a payphone. Nevertheless, all the online references I found to them mention great quality work and very reasonable prices once you get into their work queue.

    For posterity, here's the contact info:

    Cattail Foundry
    167 West Cattail Road
    Gordonville, PA 17529

    Call 717-661-9172, leave your message, and Emanuel King will call you back.

    Gotta love that lifestyle in today's world...

  17. #57
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    The weather in northern Alabama was unusual this week including a temperature swing of nearly 50 degrees F from the high to the low in a single day. A couple days ago some sort of temperature inversion with the passing weather front caused all of my metal parts to break out in a heavy layer of condensation resulting in a nice layer of surface flash rust. It was no big deal at this stage of the rebuild, but would have ruined my day had it happened after I got everything cleaned up.

    What do you who live in humid areas do to protect your machines from condensation?

    rust01.jpgrust02.jpg

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    Keep a good coat of oil on it ( I know you are tearing it down for paint) and keep an eye on it when it's get's humid

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    You too eh Thomas? Here in the NW UK it is wet, wet, wet, and I get the same problem, particularly in winter. It hit me quite badly during my rebuild just a month or so ago.
    Mostly I manage by covering everything with copious amounts of oil and regular spraying with WD40. The belt pulleys are a bit of an issue though as I don't really want to oil them. I hate rust
    Having a heated workshop I think is the only real cure.

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    Just keep them covered with a couple of sheets or a blanket. Works for me.


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