9A headstock torque
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  1. #1
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    Default 9A headstock torque

    howdy folks , I'm about ready to put the headstock back on my 9A & wondering if there is any torque spec for tightening the bolts that hold the HS on from under the HS , or just go for tight ?
    tks
    animal

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    I'll guess that SB owned no torque wrenches and few of its employees would know one if they saw it

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    Thumbs down

    Quote Originally Posted by johnoder View Post
    I'll guess that SB owned no torque wrenches and few of its employees would know one if they saw it
    That is a pretty bold and cold statement, John
    SBL used a torque wrench on bolts when/where it was necessary.
    Ted

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    Quote Originally Posted by SBLatheman View Post
    That is a pretty bold and cold statement, John
    SBL used a torque wrench on bolts when/where it was necessary.
    Ted

    Nothing at all derogatory there Ted, just the inertia of the times

    I cite my Packard (the expensive car) tools catalog of about 1930 - showing fussy engine assembly, but zero torque wrenches

    I cite the photo of Harry A. Miller in his shop during assembly of one of his Indy dominating straight eight racing engines about 1925 - no torque wrenches



    On Edit - to further illustrate the lack of such tools in industry, I'll scan the Packard page in the AM and edit it in here - special t-handle wrenches sold by one of the premier American auto makers exclusively for head bolts and main bearing bolts - that are not torque wrenches
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails not-torque-wrenches.jpg  
    Last edited by johnoder; 01-14-2018 at 09:22 AM.

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    Still, that was not a nice comment on the people at South Bend.

    To answer your question: I've been wrenching for about 65 years and believe I'm qualified to say this; decently very snug. As long as they won't loosen up it's good. DO NOT wrench 'em up farmer tight. I dunno, maybe 15-20 lb ft??

    Pete

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    when in doubt refer to MH. Or just look up recommended torque, assume grade 2
    Bolt Depot - US Recommended Bolt Torque Table

    One of the best mechanics I knew never had a torque wrench so it's not a derogatory comment....he was a funny guy, said torque wrenches were for people that didn't know how to tighten a bolt.

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    Quote Originally Posted by iwananew10K View Post
    when in doubt refer to MH. Or just look up recommended torque, assume grade 2
    Bolt Depot - US Recommended Bolt Torque Table

    One of the best mechanics I knew never had a torque wrench so it's not a derogatory comment....he was a funny guy, said torque wrenches were for people that didn't know how to tighten a bolt.
    I have to agree with your comment. Point in fact is that torque wrenches are pretty inaccurate as they measure rotational resistance and cannot parse the source of the measured resistance not just fastener stretch.

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    Quote Originally Posted by steve-l View Post
    I have to agree with your comment. Point in fact is that torque wrenches are pretty inaccurate as they measure rotational resistance and cannot parse the source of the measured resistance not just fastener stretch.
    Torque wrenches are indeed a compromise, but to dismiss them with some version of a no true scotsman fallacy is... short sighted.

    Sent from my SM-G930R4 using Tapatalk

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    I had to shorten one of my headstock bolts to get it in there because i glued the headstock to the bed first.

    Was the softest "steel" ive ever cut through. Grade 3 torque specs might be enough to yield?

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    In the early days of machinery, no one knew what a torque wrench was. In fact they didn't have standard fasteners. It was all custom-made for that application, basically made out of wrought-iron. Torque wrenches are a recent invention, And May for modern high tensile strength fasteners.

    I have been a mechanic all my working life. And yes I do own torque wrenches, up to 500 foot-pounds. 90% of the work that I do I use What is referred to as the elbow click methods. Basically, you learn how to tighten something by the feel instead of using a torque wrench. In some cases not near as accurate. But in most cases it's good enough. As long as it doesn't come loose, or damage the threads, your good.

    Stay safe and have fun.

    Joe.

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    After you have twisted bolts for a while you will be within a couple pounds of thr recommended tourqe. Like you know when you are about to brake one off. Bolt size tourqe comes naturally.
    I do check crankshaft bolts with a tourqe wrench after tightening and usually get a little movement and the wrench clicks. Not bragging. It just comes natural after a few hundred thousand bolts.


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