Results 1 to 13 of 13
Like Tree1Likes
  • 1 Post By promacjoe

Thread: faceplate

  1. #1
    bluearc is offline Aluminum
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    pennsylvania
    Posts
    89

    Default faceplate

    Where can I acquire clamps and other attachments for this faceplate, I do have 3 dogs for it however, I am unable to locate info on how to use it correctly and safely.Would I also need a thread protector for the headstock.

    My lathe is an SB 9 415 av
    thanks



  2. #2
    paulsomlo's Avatar
    paulsomlo is online now Hot Rolled
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    853

    Default

    Clamps may be found here: Enco - Guaranteed Lowest Prices on Machinery, Measuring Tools, Cutting Tools and Shop Supplies and on the surrounding pages. This link should give you some guidance regarding usage of those dogs: http://www.wswells.com/data/htral/htral_index.html. No thread protector needed. Recheck the catalog number on your lathe, might be something like 415-YA or 415-ZA.

    Paul

  3. #3
    promacjoe is online now Hot Rolled
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Tn USA
    Posts
    888

    Default

    A couple of key points when using a faceplate,

    1: never clap a piece of cast-iron directly to the faceplate, "cast side directly to the faceplate". Always place a piece of poster board/cardboard between it. Not corrugated cardboard. This will even out the clamping pressure across the faceplate. the rough surface can damage the faceplate and warp the workpiece.

    2: always use a low speed when doing faceplate work. The centripetal force can throw out support blocks which could cause the entire park to be thrown off.

    3: never stand in line with the workpiece, always stand off to one side when you turn the machine on. Even when the machine is running stand off to one side never in line with the workpiece.

    Stay safe and have fun
    bridgedog likes this.

  4. #4
    bluearc is offline Aluminum
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    pennsylvania
    Posts
    89

    Default

    paulsomlo

    In another post someone had indicated that my lathe my have had made some changes on it or that it may be a rare model 415 because of the v pulley's instead of the flat and side oilers instead of top oilers. I also read where this model pre-dates the 9'a-b-c- models however, I cannot locate any parts catalogs specific to this machine.
    SERIAL # IS 85574

    LENGHT OF BED 4

    CATALOG# 415-AV

    I am trying to make sure that parts I order for it will work, so far I have been unable to order parts using the numbers listed above, I am hoping that someone on the forum may be familiar with this lathe or can offer advise on how to order the correct parts for it.
    I appreciate any assistance with this.

  5. #5
    bluearc is offline Aluminum
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    pennsylvania
    Posts
    89

    Default

    promacjoe,

    Thanks for this info,it is obviously important to know, I will make a copy of this and keep it with the faceplate.

  6. #6
    paulsomlo's Avatar
    paulsomlo is online now Hot Rolled
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    853

    Default

    The V pulleys make it unusual, I don't know about rare, and the oilers don't really figure in.

    I have SN 85689, a 415-YA, so our lathes were built months apart. As far as parts catalogs, if you could find one, it would be of limited utility - Grizzly most likely wouldn't have parts for any of these lathes and if you are buying parts from the used or aftermarket, part numbers aren't always used to specify. What parts are you looking for, I may be able to help.

    BTW, I checked on that catalog number - you're right, the "AV" indicates 4' bed, v pulleys.

  7. #7
    Putch's Avatar
    Putch is offline Hot Rolled
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Butler, PA
    Posts
    885

    Default

    hey blue arc - v-pulleys have nothing to do with how you bolt things on to your face plate! For starters, you can get some good all thread whatever size those holes are with some nuts and build you some kind of strap clamps. Or you could get one of those milling hold down sets with toe clamps and all that. Those are pretty useful with a face plate. Believe it or not, lengths of 2x4 are great for under the heel of a toe clamp and you can cut em to whatever length you need rather than stacking up step blocks. I don't know about you but I'd rather get hit in the face with a short piece of 2x4 than one or 2 of those steel step blocks!

  8. #8
    Putch's Avatar
    Putch is offline Hot Rolled
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Butler, PA
    Posts
    885

    Default

    ...and you can use t-nuts in those slots

  9. #9
    promacjoe is online now Hot Rolled
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Tn USA
    Posts
    888

    Default

    there are differences between your lathe and the newer 9 " workshop lathe, but most of the important parts that you might need are the same. The real differences are as follows:

    1: your head stock probably does not have segmented bearings which means it should not be run at the higher speeds. This is something you need to check.

    2: some of the bed dimensions are different. For instance the gap between the ways is wider. This means the headstock and tailstock clamps are different. Also the distance between the apron and bed is different. Don't expect to convert it to a model A or B, without doing major milling on the bed. Approximately 9/16 of an inch off the bottom lip. Not something I recommend.

    3: the saddle is also slightly different. Although the newer saddles are interchangeable to some extent, there may not be an opening for the cross feed gear assembly to mate with the cross feed screw.

    Most of the other items are interchangeable, with a little if any modification. The only part that might need modification is the tailstock. You might need to add spacers or machine it for proper alignment up and down. But this might need to be done for any machine, even machines of the same year model.

    Hope this helps.

    Have fun and stay safe.

  10. #10
    Bruce Nelson is offline Stainless
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Wisconsin (from May to November); Florida (from November to May)
    Posts
    1,279

    Default

    Like Putch says, you can use appropriate sized t-nuts in those slots, like you would on a milling machine table with t-slots. However, I would opt for using the small threaded holes in your faceplate for mounting workpieces. You should limit the unbalanced weight mounted on the faceplate. Out-of-balance work on faceplates are very dangerous. At any time, revolutions-per-minute should be kept very low, and caution to see that everything clears the workpiece before running under power. Threaded studs to fit your faceplate, nuts and bolts can be gotten from your local hardware store.

    Lord Byron

  11. #11
    bluearc is offline Aluminum
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    pennsylvania
    Posts
    89

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by promacjoe View Post
    there are differences between your lathe and the newer 9 " workshop lathe, but most of the important parts that you might need are the same. The real differences are as follows:

    1: your head stock probably does not have segmented bearings which means it should not be run at the higher speeds. This is something you need to check.

    2: some of the bed dimensions are different. For instance the gap between the ways is wider. This means the headstock and tailstock clamps are different. Also the distance between the apron and bed is different. Don't expect to convert it to a model A or B, without doing major milling on the bed. Approximately 9/16 of an inch off the bottom lip. Not something I recommend.

    3: the saddle is also slightly different. Although the newer saddles are interchangeable to some extent, there may not be an opening for the cross feed gear assembly to mate with the cross feed screw.

    Most of the other items are interchangeable, with a little if any modification. The only part that might need modification is the tailstock. You might need to add spacers or machine it for proper alignment up and down. But this might need to be done for any machine, even machines of the same year model.

    Hope this helps.

    Have fun and stay safe.
    I have included a picture of a ruler across the ways, maybe you can compare it to yours so we can help determine if parts will fit.
    .

  12. #12
    bluearc is offline Aluminum
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    pennsylvania
    Posts
    89

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Putch View Post
    hey blue arc - v-pulleys have nothing to do with how you bolt things on to your face plate! For starters, you can get some good all thread whatever size those holes are with some nuts and build you some kind of strap clamps. Or you could get one of those milling hold down sets with toe clamps and all that. Those are pretty useful with a face plate. Believe it or not, lengths of 2x4 are great for under the heel of a toe clamp and you can cut em to whatever length you need rather than stacking up step blocks. I don't know about you but I'd rather get hit in the face with a short piece of 2x4 than one or 2 of those steel step blocks!
    Someone had posted elsewhere that the side oilers and the v pulleys are not consistent with the 415 model and I am wondering if this was added by someone in the past, I am trying to identify these parts to help me acquire parts in the future.

  13. #13
    arc
    arc is offline Plastic
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    43

    Default

    bluearc,
    sometimes those smaller holes were used for chucking wood for turning...a lot of tools used wood parts in the days before plastic. Just shows how versatile a machinist/mechanic was in the old days.
    the bad part is cleaning the oil soaked wood dust from the machine

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •