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  1. #1
    bluearc is offline Aluminum
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    Default Milling attachment for SB 9

    How many different types of mill attachments are there of the SB 9. I just bought one and the base will not fit my machine.

  2. #2
    Bruce Nelson is online now Stainless
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    If your milling attachment is a authentic South Bend accessory, you have only to make a adapter to fit the base of the milling attachment to the cross slide of the lathe. My view is that all of the milling attachments made by South Bend were meant for the SB9. I bought one in excellent shape and made a adapter to fit my 10L.

    Lord Byron

  3. #3
    bluearc is offline Aluminum
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Nelson View Post
    If your milling attachment is a authentic South Bend accessory, you have only to make a adapter to fit the base of the milling attachment to the cross slide of the lathe. My view is that all of the milling attachments made by South Bend were meant for the SB9. I bought one in excellent shape and made a adapter to fit my 10L.

    Lord Byron
    Where can I purchase an adapter. Here are some pics of the lathe and the mill.






  4. #4
    Ken-Bergen is offline Cast Iron
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    Perhaps I'm missing something but it appears to be all there.
    It doesn't fit in the compound slide but rather replaces the compound slide.

  5. #5
    tommy1010 is offline Cast Iron
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    That should fit into the compound mounting hole. There also is a plate that would offset the attachment. It attaches in the same manner. Sometimes you can find them on flea bay.

  6. #6
    Bruce Nelson is online now Stainless
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    Are you sure that it doesn't fit? Your pictures show that it is all there. Remove the compound rest by loosening the two bolts that are at an angle in the front of the compound rest. They normally are allen set screws, yours appears to be replaced with a hex head cap screw. The compound rest should then be lifted off the cross-slide. The hole in the top of the cross-slide should accept the boss feature on the bottom of the milling attachment.

    Lord Byron

  7. #7
    promacjoe is offline Hot Rolled
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Nelson View Post
    They normally are allen set screws,
    They appear to be the factory "Square Head" bolts. South Bend did not use Allen set screws in this location. They use the same type bolt head as they did on the carriage locking bolt. One wrench to keep up with.

    Joe

  8. #8
    Bruce Nelson is online now Stainless
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    Quote Originally Posted by promacjoe View Post
    They appear to be the factory "Square Head" bolts. South Bend did not use Allen set screws in this location. They use the same type bolt head as they did on the carriage locking bolt. One wrench to keep up with.

    Joe
    They are Allen set screws on my 16 inch SB, and on my SB10L. They were also on three new 13 inch SB that we had delivered to our Tech College in 1969. Correction, they were Allen dog point set screws. Tightening or loosening anything but a Allen set screw to clamp or unclamp the compound would be impossible at some angular settings due to overhang of the compound rest.

    Lord Byron

  9. #9
    promacjoe is offline Hot Rolled
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    Not to be argumentative but, he doesn't have a 16" lathe or 13". He has a 9". My 9" came with squarehead bolts. Just like what he has. Compare apples to apples, not apples to elephants. That's what comparing a 16 "South Bend lathe, to a 9" is. A 16", is the elephant. And elephants eat apples.

    They are different machines, and the parts do not interchange.

    Joe

  10. #10
    Cole2534 is offline Titanium
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    My 9A and 10L both had hex socket screws.

  11. #11
    promacjoe is offline Hot Rolled
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    lathes.co.uk

    " Carriage Assembly - 1936. An art-worked picture ". " The compound slide, typical of South Bend "

    They appear to be the factory "Square Head" bolts.

    http://www.lathes.co.uk/southbend9-inch/img14.gif

    Joe

  12. #12
    Bruce Nelson is online now Stainless
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    Quote Originally Posted by promacjoe View Post
    Not to be argumentative but, he doesn't have a 16" lathe or 13". He has a 9". My 9" came with squarehead bolts. Just like what he has. Compare apples to apples, not apples to elephants. That's what comparing a 16 "South Bend lathe, to a 9" is. A 16", is the elephant. And elephants eat apples.

    They are different machines, and the parts do not interchange.

    Joe
    Sure sounds argumentative to me. There is plenty of time from 1936 to now. Probably South Bend thought dog point allen set screws were a improvement.

    Lord Byron

  13. #13
    bluearc is offline Aluminum
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Nelson View Post
    Are you sure that it doesn't fit? Your pictures show that it is all there. Remove the compound rest by loosening the two bolts that are at an angle in the front of the compound rest. They normally are allen set screws, yours appears to be replaced with a hex head cap screw. The compound rest should then be lifted off the cross-slide. The hole in the top of the cross-slide should accept the boss feature on the bottom of the milling attachment.

    Lord Byron

    You were correct it does fit however, does the curved slot at the bottom indicate the mill may also be used other lathes.


  14. #14
    iwananew10K is online now Titanium
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    that curved slot is for a bolt(s) to thread into a tapped hole(s) in the cross slide - at some point SB started drilling and tapping the cross slides just for this purpose - if you plan on using the milling attachment i would recommend tapping the holes - it will make the attachment much sturdier.
    here`s a pic of how SB did it at the factory - the holes are tapped 5/16" x 18 tpi


  15. #15
    Hendy 4CX42 is offline Aluminum
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    your cut-off tool holder is sticking out way too far. The curved slot also allows you to set the attachment for milling angles, thats why the divisions are on it.

  16. #16
    promacjoe is offline Hot Rolled
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    Go to: The SBL Workshop - How To...

    And open these 2 documents.

    1938 Print - Tapped Holes for Milling Attachment, SBL ATT-21

    1937 How to Fit a Milling Attachment to a South Bend Lathe, SBL-ATT-7

    There might also be other documents on this site, that would help you. Feel free to look around..

    Have fun, and stay safe.

    Joe.

  17. #17
    Rex TX is offline Stainless
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    As to the compound set screws, it's my understanding that the pre-WW2 lathes had square heads, postware were allen set screws. My post-war 9A has the allen screws

  18. #18
    promacjoe is offline Hot Rolled
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    My 9C lathe was made in 1942, so they were still using them at that time. The same wrench fit the carriage locking bolt, reversing gear bolts and the compound rest clamping bolts. Only the tailstock wrench was different.
    I do not know when they change the type of screws they used. My statement just referred to the fact that they did use squarehead bolts on the 9 ", and it was not fair to say that they had been replaced because the newer larger lathe did not come with them. I don't know if they have been replaced or not, I cannot say. But they appear to be the factory type bolts.

    Some people like to keep their machines as original as possible. Changing this type of bolt, because someone says that is not original, because their newer, Larger machine did not come with that type of bolt is wrong. South Bend made many changes to their machines over the years. For instance on my 1942 9C, the headstock bearing clamps are tightened with a hex head bolt. On the 10K this was changed to a socket head cap screw. I have no doubt that they made this change to the 9" in later years.

    If the guy had a 1945 Chevrolet car and someone else says it was not a Chevrolet because he was comparing it to a 1965 Chevrolet truck you would definitely look at them funny. Even though they are made by the same company they are very different vehicles.

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