Removing Dark Patina from Cast Iron?
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  1. #1
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    Default Removing Dark Patina from Cast Iron?

    For no real reason, decided to try to make my backplate, dog plate and dogs a little prettier

    Degreaser doesn't do it (Purple Power), is there a way to remove it? Considered spinning the plates on the lathe and carefully using Scotch Brite; perhaps bead blasting (for the dogs)?

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    If you take a fresh cut across the surfaces you'll expose fresh material that will be shinier. Depending on the quality of the CI it may end up a bit "hairy" too. I just did this on a face plate and it ended up shiny and hairy, but flat enough for my purposes. Wax may help prolong the look. Bead/sand blasting will turn it dull gray in my experience. In the end it isn't worth the effort. If you want it shiny and silver for a long time buy a new plate to look at or paint it.

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    I think of them more like a cast iron fry pan. They get "seasoned" over the years and I just tune them up with a bit of oiled Scotchbrite every few years.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tobnpr View Post
    For no real reason, decided to try to make my backplate, dog plate and dogs a little prettier

    Degreaser doesn't do it (Purple Power), is there a way to remove it? Considered spinning the plates on the lathe and carefully using Scotch Brite; perhaps bead blasting (for the dogs)?
    .
    .
    i work with fixtures and parts weighing tons. nylon abrasive and a coarse bench stone removes rust after you wiped any oil or grease off. then i wipe with alcohol rag and stone with a fine stone. rust and oil coolant the stone will not go over smooth. you will feel something is there. keep working at cleaning, stoning and eventually it stones smoothly
    .
    nylon abrasive pad in a 2 or 3" right angle air grinder speeds things up on really rusty stuff.

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    ScotchBrite or other non-woven abrasive pads. Generally four choices for how aggressive you want the grit to be. Rub with oil, makes a big difference.

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    You might try Evapo-Rust or similar product. There are a few products out there including one made by WD-40. These work pretty well with rust or like kind discoloration and are pretty much non-toxic watery solutions that you just soak your parts in for a few hours or overnight and parts come out looking pretty clean.
    CWC(4)


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