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  1. #21
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    "I don't see why atlas is banned and sb is not."

    Perhaps because Southbend was at one time a commercial duty lathe and to my knowledge Atlas never was.

    Vlad

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vladymere gr View Post
    "I don't see why atlas is banned and sb is not."

    Perhaps because Southbend was at one time a commercial duty lathe and to my knowledge Atlas never was.

    Vlad
    It is not up to me. If it were, SB would be welcome for reasons that have nought to do with the machine itself.

    They were so ubiquitous as 'good enough' light lathes - fossils, practically, of War One era lathes - that successive legions and generations of legions of some truly capable and dedicated lathe-hands have patiently accomplished some rather astonishingly good - and clever - feats on them. More 'in spite of' the SB itself than because of it.

    But there yah go. They ran what they had, adapted, compensated - created and still yet-today maintain, a very respectable reservoir of talent and ingenuity.

    I am not Milacron. I cannot read his mind. I do not even play him on TV.

    But if it was me? I'd welcome the South Bend community for a higher than average contribution of brains and skill, patience, inventiveness - and their long-running willingness to share it with others - SB users or not.

    I'd not give two shits in a windstorm about the sub-optimal iron they execute it on.

    Another thing helps, and helps a great deal.

    MANY users of SB have at one time been professionals and adept at tooling and running serious lathes. They UNDERSTAND that they are dealing with a light lathe with many challenges. They appreciate the heavier lathes they do not have money, space, or power 'budget' to keep where they are now.

    It isn't common for a seasoned SB hand to 'challenge' more costly and capable lathes. Rather, he might want one himself, and takes pride in doing the best he can with what he has until... or remembers back to when.. etc.

    This attitude makes more friends than enemies, of course.

    Now - by comparison - for reasons that a psychologist might better understand than a machinist - there seems to be no shortage of outright FOOLS that feel compelled to acquire some of the trashiest-ever of "Lathe Shaped Objects" - then try to pick a fight with owner/operators of every 'better' lathe on planet Earth that their personal POS is just as good - nay BETTER THAN - a 'real' lathe, be it the poor but honest value-for-money SB Nine... or a 400 HP roll turning monster capable of spewing serious chips, each one more massive than their entire toy.

    Thank you, South-Benders for being pleasant folks to share with. Long may you prosper.

    The arrogant "LSO" lot? Up the dark place with your LSO, please. And "crosswise".

    Exception granted on the "pictures, or it didn't happen" rule.

    We don't really want to know how it "worked IN", let alone how it "worked OUT"!

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  4. #23
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    Thanks everybody that actually contributed useful information to this thread. To those who didn't, I didn't ask if you thought it was a good idea to do so or if this lathe was worth doing it to or why I would want to do it to that lathe, your opinion doesn't mean anything to me and my reasoning to do so shouldn't matter to you. Thanks for all of the good ideas. I do have access to large machines in a machine shop that does abb robot integration so making it isn't really that difficult. Just wanted to see if anybody had any experience making one before.

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    I think that a fine machine. Well worth fixing..Agree not a tough job at all.

    Making new not that difficult.

    But would think about a 1/4" tube wall thickness.

    Still I did barrel work with not going through the tube but between the head end and a steady.

    Buck
    Last edited by michiganbuck; 04-21-2017 at 05:09 PM.

  6. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by moonlight machine View Post
    I don't see why atlas is banned and sb is not.
    Nothing wrong with South Bends. Plenty used in commercial environments, don't you actually have one also ?

    The design of the A**** vs. the SB are glaring...the first is the ways. SBs have V ways and the A**** has flat.

    What it really gets down to is the type of people that each attract, and SBs tend to attract a quite different crowd, where the A***** is typically home shop people. The A**** is limited on this site because of who they attract, plus the fact that you rarely find one in a production environment. It's really that simple.

    If you don't like the SBs, no need to poo-poo them, because a lot of people do like them and they are certainly one of the most popular, if not THE most popular brand of lathe in the world, despite not being manufactured anymore...of course that is true for MOST lathes used in production environments, not a lot of good ones being manufactured these days, more focus on CNC...

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    QR: [I don't see why a...s is banned and sb is not.]

    I think it just Rules are Rules. Nothing wrong with the larger At...s Except soft flat ways would not last long in manufacturing... but even the very small SBs have been uses in many war time news reels and are a true manufacturing machine.

    Likely the site owner does not want the site bogged down with the same question a thousand times from people not even taking the time to read How to Run a Lathe.

    Sites like that don't last long.

    Still you can bet some very nice work comes from soft flat way machines

  8. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Monarchist View Post
    That surely sounds more as if you are looking at a spindle that is ALREADY some Pilgrim's DIY shop-fab or at least flawed modification.

    1927 was 'fat times' for most manufacturers. War One was nearly ten years behind them, surplused machine tools left-over from it finally being used up, economy was in high-gear with the crash of '29 still in the unexpected future?

    No Fine Way QC would have been likely to let that pass AT ALL when the most common collet-closer of the era - and common they were - was an arse-end handwheel that NEEDED decent concentricity and would have led to a serious stink being raised were that to be impaired.

    If that spindle was ever OEM, it has been f**ked with, post-production and delivery.

    Doesn't happen to be oversize vs factory spec does it?



    Oh.. and DO please confirm you speak of the rotating item - the spindle itself - AND NOT the difference between the spindle axis and that of a clearance hole in a cast-iron cover?
    Quote Originally Posted by kitno455 View Post
    Don't drill, bore. Setup an outboard support, clamp a long, counterweighted bar in the toolpost, and drag it. You'd have to drill in place, which might shift the work some.

    Also, the spindles on these lathes were dead soft from the factory. Show some pictures of the spindle nose too, they were generally very nicely machined, with a ground OD. That should help identify if it is the original spindle.

    allan
    Here are some pictures of my spindle and bushing and the offset through hole.






  9. #28
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    Sure looks like the factory spindle to me. The small end of the spindle does not look that bad, but the picture makes it look like there are some protrusions into the bore, like someone already tried to drill it oversize from the small end, and screwed it up.

    allan

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    Quote Originally Posted by kitno455 View Post
    Sure looks like the factory spindle to me. The small end of the spindle does not look that bad, but the picture makes it look like there are some protrusions into the bore, like someone already tried to drill it oversize from the small end, and screwed it up.

    allan
    In the first picture you can see the small end and it has a 1" bore drilled straight about 4 inches deep and then after that is the 7/8" bore that goes the rest of the way through the spindle and it is even with one edge of the one inch bore and 1/8" from the other side. I don't know if that makes any since or not but the offset bore starts 4" deep into the small end of the spindle. It's center point is off about 1/16" from the center of the spindle.

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    Quote Originally Posted by moonlight machine View Post
    OK, if you were marooned on an island somewhere and it was all you had you could figure out a way to do it. But your not so why bother with it, especially on an old sb. I don't see why atlas is banned and sb is not. Just get a real lathe and be done with it.
    For a split second I thought John Welden wrote this!!

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    Could have should have made a step counter bore to follow the original id through the tube…

    Before screw up a 1 1/8 reamer ground to end cutting with a 7/8 pilot....but that heavy cut may be too much for the lathe..
    Perhaps 1" " with a 7/8 pilot for a rougher... and 1" TO 1 1/8" follow up.. yes a slow rpm and fine in-feed with oil and perhaps re sharp at 110 to 12 primary.

    I have made reamers with alternating angles so every other tooth cuts a portion.

    Even a piloted boring bar off the tail stock...



    But done is done and it is a mess to straighten out...a boring bar with a bushing at one end for a line bore the best choice,IMHO

    Boring bar could come off tail stock.

    Still say post 14 the best way to make good

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    Quote Originally Posted by michiganbuck View Post
    Could have should have made a step counter bore to follow the original id through the tube…

    Before screw up a 1 1/8 reamer ground to end cutting with a 7/8 pilot....but that heavy cut may be too much for the lathe..
    Perhaps 1" " with a 7/8 pilot for a rougher... and 1" TO 1 1/8" follow up.. yes a slow rpm and fine in-feed with oil and perhaps re sharp at 110 to 12 primary.

    I have made reamers with alternating angles so every other tooth cuts a portion.

    Even a piloted boring bar off the tail stock...



    But done is done and it is a mess to straighten out...a boring bar with a bushing at one end for a line bore the best choice,IMHO

    Boring bar could come off tail stock.

    Still say post 14 the best way to make good
    If I'm going to go to the trouble of putting work into it to make it right I wont mess with trying to fix the original spindle. I would rather just make a new one and harden it. Those are some good ideas though. Thanks

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    If you bored it as far as you could from the front nose.. What do you think 6" or so? bore it to 1 1/8.. perhaps more depth just straight in from the front..
    You can use the heaviest boring bar.. even put your steady on the boring bar for more support.. and come off the tail. and 10 12 " clearance for axial cutting

    Then use that bore as a bushing.to go in in with a 1 1/8 reamer ground for end cutting..Or even better a 1 5/32 reamer OD ground to have a greater circle grind would cut like an end mill.. Yes reamer center on the tail.

    Yes it will one-side way down the hole so go slow feed there.

    Perhaps a 1 1/8 end mill.. turn down the shank for a drive extension that comes off tail center..might run in the steady for support.

  15. #34
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    It's been said that a lathe is the only machine capable of rebuilding itself. If you can figure out how to make a lathe re-bore it's own spindle, I'd say that other guy was right.

    Mehbee a cat-head mounted bearing on the left side of the spindle supporting a boring bar. Boring bar has adjustable pads to ride the newly cut ID, obviously a radially adjustable tool point goes in there somewhere. Fix it to the toolpost or cross-slide somehow then set your feeds from the QCGB. Fire up the lathe, engage clutch to feed carriage to the right and hope for the best.

    Just not sure how you'd manage chip evacuation...


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